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NEWS
By NICOLE FULLER and NICOLE FULLER,SUN REPORTER | February 1, 2006
Florence Peterson Kendall, a pioneer in the field of physical therapy as an advocate, author and academic, died Saturday at the Sunrise assisted-living facility in Severna Park after battling cancer. She was 95. In 1947, Mrs. Kendall helped draft legislation that legally established the practice of physical therapy in Maryland. She received numerous accolades during her more than 70 years in the field, including being named Physical Therapist of the Century by the Maryland Chapter of the American Physical Therapy Association in 2002.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
A chain of more than 50 mid-Atlantic physical therapy clinics that rebranded itself Pivot Physical Therapy earlier this month has added five clinics in West Virginia, officials said Wednesday. The chain has 37 facilities in Maryland, some of which were known as Maryland SportsCare & Rehab. Operations won't change at the facilities, but officials believe operating as one organization enables the company to leverage the reputation of more than 500 physical therapists, certified athletic trainers and support staff.
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NEWS
March 16, 2007
Cheryl Lynn Rimerman, a physical therapist, died of lung cancer March 6 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Eldersburg resident was 42. Born Cheryl Lynn Brager in Baltimore and raised in Pikesville, she was a 1982 graduate of Park School. She attended the University of Maryland, College Park and received a degree in physical therapy from what is now Baltimore City Community College. A physical therapy assistant, she worked at Greenspring Physical Therapy and Carroll Sports Rehabilitation until 2005.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2013
Three days before Christmas, Paul Blair felt the pain. It was as if he'd hit the fence, chest first, while chasing a fly ball. Rushed to Howard County General Hospital, Blair, the former Orioles' outfielder, learned he had suffered a heart attack. “Doctors said that my main (coronary) artery was 98 percent blocked,” said Blair, 66, of Woodstock. “If it had closed up, they said I could have cancelled Christmas.” Instead, surgeons inserted a stent in the artery and prescribed four months of physical therapy for Blair, who expects to complete it this week.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | December 2, 1991
While many office workers are finding themselves streamlined out of their jobs, there's one white-collar occupation that has seen a steady increase in demand for its hands-on skills: physical therapy. With an ever-increasing population in need of rehabilitation services, projections are for demand to continue to grow.In a recent national survey of health-care executive recruiters by Dunhill Personnel System Inc., 43 percent of the respondents said occupational and physical therapy jobs would increase in coming years.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | March 18, 1992
The Rev. Mark Schlichter may have left the pulpit, but he didn't leave the Christian ministry altogether.Schlichter, who had preachedto congregations from three churches since 1983, left last October to pursue his original career -- physical therapy.His decision came after members of his three-church parish decided they needed individual pastors.Schlichter, who served as pastorfor St. Mark's United Church of Christ in Snydersburg, Lazarus UCC in Lineboro and Trinity UCC in Manchester said, "I had served as an ordained minister of the parish for eight years and I oversaw the parish while the dissolution took place."
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1998
A Southwest Baltimore woman has won a $733,329 jury award from St. Agnes Hospital because of an injury she suffered while undergoing physical therapy after an operation to repair ligament damage to her right knee.A Baltimore Circuit Court jury returned the verdict last week in favor of Marsha Shelburne, 32, after a three-week trial before Judge John Carroll Byrnes.The jury awarded Shelburne $80,000 for medical expenses, $139,261 for past and future lost wages, $200,000 for pain and suffering, and $314,068 to pay for housework she no longer can do, court records show.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | May 5, 1992
Spring is a heavy season for physical therapists. Walk into any physical therapy facility at any time of day, and you'll see evidence of it.In the morning there's the retiree getting friction massage on his tennis arm for the tendinitis that flared up after a recent match. In the afternoon, you'll see the high school lacrosse player soaking his sprained ankle in an ice bath. Late in the day, the sedentary office worker will arrive for heat treatments after wrenching her back turning over the garden on the first sunny weekend of the season.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | May 5, 1992
Spring is a heavy season for physical therapists. Walk into any physical therapy facility at any time of day, and you'll see evidence of it.In the morning there's the retiree getting friction massage on his tennis arm for the tendinitis that flared up after a recent match. In the afternoon, you'll see the high school lacrosse player soaking his sprained ankle in an ice bath. Late in the day, the sedentary office worker will arrive for heat treatments after wrenching her back turning over the garden on the first sunny weekend of the season.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | August 20, 1991
Faced with a choice, Pat Butz decided 21 months ago not to take life sitting down.was extraordinarily difficult for me to walk," says the 47-year-old Monkton resident, whose multiple sclerosis had progressed to the point that she was almost ready for a wheelchair.Instead, she opted for therapy and exercise in a heated pool, where she is freed of gravity's drag by the buoyancy of the water and loosened up by its warmth. These days, thanks to her three-times-a-week water workout, she is able to do strength training at the gym as well.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2013
Sister Jeanne Marie Armstrong, who nursed and did physical therapy treatment for her fellow School Sisters of Notre Dame, died of a stroke Aug. 18 at her order's health care center in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County. She was 86. Born Jeanne Marie Armstrong in Baltimore, she was the daughter of John Ernest Armstrong and Lucille Marie Holliday. Raised in the Forest Park area, she attended All Saints School and was a 1945 graduate of the Institute of Notre Dame. She was a graduate of the Mercy Hospital School of Nursing.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
The Orioles raised some eyebrows when reliever Pedro Strop was seen taking grounders at shortstop and making throwing to first before Wednesday's game. Strop, who is on the 15-day disabled list with a lower back strain, was signed out of the Dominican Republic as a shortstop and was converted into a pitcher as a minor leaguer in the Colorado Rockies system. But the Orioles have no plans to return Strop to his original position. The drill, which Strop said was the idea of pitching coach Rick Adair, was performed in order for Strop to repeat his natural throwing motion.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
Kaci DeWitt-Rickards remembers being a chunky kid with a steady diet of Burger King chicken tenders, vanilla milkshakes and Papa John's pizza. By her sophomore year in college at the University of Miami, her adolescent pudge had ballooned into a weight problem. The 5-foot-4 exercise physiology major hit her heaviest weight ever that fall in 2010, weighing in at 167 pounds. She felt bad about herself and didn't have a lot of energy. But most of all, she felt like a hypocrite as she studied for a career to help people stay fit. "If you're going to go out and teach a healthy lifestyle, you have to live it," DeWitt-Rickards remembers a professor saying that fall semester.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun Media Group | March 20, 2013
Mobility, stability and agility are the targets inside the new Kinetics System room at Colosseum Gym in Columbia. Everyone from power-lifters to post-rehab patients can work with trainers to reach their goals, according to trainer Vic Selvaggi. Added in summer 2012 as part of a reconfiguration and expansion of the gym, the Kinetics System room houses specialized pneumatic equipment that trainers use to assess clients' abilities and form before developing a fitness regimen. The goal is to imporve form and functional movement before moving on to weight training, or as Selvaggi puts it, "movement before muscles.
EXPLORE
February 20, 2013
Aberdeen High School senior Jimmia McCluskey signed her letter of intent last week to attend and run track at Temple University in Philadelphia. McCluskey will major in physical therapy. Pictured in the front row from left are Tonia McCluskey (mother), Jimmia McCluskey, Jimmie McCluskey (father) and in the back row from left are Coach John Mobley, Athletic Director Tim Lindecamp and Coach Kyree Edwards.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
Towson Rehabilitation Center LLC, a Towson physical, occupational and speech therapy provider, must restore more than $29,000 in interest to the company's 401(k) retirement plan, according to a consent judgment obtained in federal court by the U.S. Labor Department. In a lawsuit filed last January, the labor department alleged that since January 2006, Towson Rehabilitation and CEO Howard Neels failed to pay employee contributions to the plan, paid some employee contributions late without interest and failed to segregate the plan's assets from the company's assets.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1997
A Baltimore woman pleaded guilty yesterday to running an elaborate fraud scheme at a physical therapy clinic that federal prosecutors say raked in more than $1.5 million and enabled her to buy luxury cars and a pricey South Florida condominium.Deborah S. Kolodner, 42, stole money by submitting fraudulent insurance claims for physical therapy never provided to patients at Industrial Medical and Physical Therapy, her St. Paul Place clinic, according to her plea agreement filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1998
Bally Total Fitness Holding Corp. and Kessler Rehabilitation Corp. announced a joint venture yesterday in which Kessler will operate physical therapy centers within Bally fitness clubs.Bally -- which has a 400-employee regional service center in Towson and 12 fitness centers in the state -- and Kessler of West Orange, N.J., will have equal control over the newly created KR/BTF LLC.Dave Southern, a Bally spokesman, said the companies have yet to decide which clubs will be renovated to include the rehabilitation centers, although at least one Maryland location will have one.The companies plan to open up to 100 rehabilitation centers nationwide.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
ACL tears have taken out so many University of Maryland football players, you'd think the injury is contagious. Four Terps football players have suffered from the knee injuries this season. Dr. Michael E Trice, assistant professor of orthopedic surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of the Johns Hopkins Cartilage Restoration Center at Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, says ACL tears aren't that uncommon in athletes. What is an ACL injury? An ACL injury is a tear of the anterior cruciate ligament, the primary stabilizer of the knee.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
Fans were missing linebacker Ray Lewis at the end of the Ravens' last game. Lewis is out for the season after suffering a triceps tear, a rare injury with a long recovery time. Dr. Umasuthan Srikumaran, assistant professor of orthopedic surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said triceps tears are significant injuries for athletes. What is a triceps tear and how common is this injury? The triceps is the muscle on the back part of your arm. It originates from the shoulder blade and the upper portion of the arm, crosses the elbow joint, and inserts into the ulna, a bone in your forearm.
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