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By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,Chicago Tribune | October 18, 2007
Your doctor probably knows it. Medical organizations certainly do. But most patients have no idea. The annual physical examination - that encounter when a physician looks in your throat, listens to your heart, pokes your abdomen, checks your reflexes and tests your blood - is no longer a generally recommended medical practice. That's because there is scant scientific evidence showing that yearly checkups help prevent disease, death or disability for adults with no symptoms. Many tests and procedures performed during the visits have questionable value, experts say. Instead of an annual physical, healthy adults should undergo a much-streamlined exam that's focused on prevention every one to five years depending on a person's age, sex and medical profile, the American College of Physicians and other professional groups suggest.
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FEATURES
By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,Chicago Tribune | October 18, 2007
Your doctor probably knows it. Medical organizations certainly do. But most patients have no idea. The annual physical examination - that encounter when a physician looks in your throat, listens to your heart, pokes your abdomen, checks your reflexes and tests your blood - is no longer a generally recommended medical practice. That's because there is scant scientific evidence showing that yearly checkups help prevent disease, death or disability for adults with no symptoms. Many tests and procedures performed during the visits have questionable value, experts say. Instead of an annual physical, healthy adults should undergo a much-streamlined exam that's focused on prevention every one to five years depending on a person's age, sex and medical profile, the American College of Physicians and other professional groups suggest.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 31, 2005
President Bush has purposely lost eight pounds since his last medical checkup, in December, and his doctors said after his annual physical examination yesterday that he was in "excellent health." Bush, 59, remains in the "superior" fitness category for a man his age, the doctors said. They also said Bush, who exercises six times a week, was "fit for duty" and expected to remain so for the rest of his term. No significant new health problem was detected, and findings from the physical examination and the standard laboratory tests were within the normal range, according to a statement from the team of nine specialists who examined Bush.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 31, 2005
President Bush has purposely lost eight pounds since his last medical checkup, in December, and his doctors said after his annual physical examination yesterday that he was in "excellent health." Bush, 59, remains in the "superior" fitness category for a man his age, the doctors said. They also said Bush, who exercises six times a week, was "fit for duty" and expected to remain so for the rest of his term. No significant new health problem was detected, and findings from the physical examination and the standard laboratory tests were within the normal range, according to a statement from the team of nine specialists who examined Bush.
NEWS
By Brian C. Mooney and Brian C. Mooney,Boston Globe | July 9, 1991
Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas received a medical or physical deferment from the military draft in 1971, less than three years after he passed a Selective Service physical examination.For most of the period from 1966 to 1971, during the Vietnam War, Judge Thomas received student draft deferments from his draft board in Chatham County, Ga., according to Selective Service System records on file in Washington.The exception covered the period from July 1968, after he left a Roman Catholic seminary and lost his deferment as a divinity student, to March 1969, after he entered Holy Cross College in Worcester, Mass.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Joe Nawrozki and Patrick Gilbert and Joe Nawrozki,Evening Sun Staff | September 18, 1991
The Maryland Court of Special Appeals has ordered the city to rehire a man who failed a fire department physical examination shortly after he entered the fire academy in May 1985.As a result of the decision, Charles E. Johnson, now 36, is eligible to re-enter the fire academy with back wages. "I had wanted to be a firefighter since I was a kid," Johnson said today. "When they fired me, I was heartbroken."That hurt was translated into determination, he said, when he chose to battle to "get back what was rightfully mine."
NEWS
August 29, 2001
Volunteers sought for Promise to Keep mentoring program Family and Children's Services is seeking volunteers for Promise to Keep, a program that coordinates mentoring relationships for children in Howard County. Promise to Keep also seeks to link mentors from the business community with schools to help improve student performance. Mentors usually meet weekly with the children and commit to maintain the relationship for a calendar or school year. Family and Children's Services, a nonprofit organization, is at the Family Life Center in Wilde Lake Village Center, Columbia.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | January 17, 1999
As Orioles general manager Frank Wren continues to retool the Orioles' bullpen, he remains uncertain whether Xavier Hernandez will be one of the components.Last month, Hernandez, a free agent, agreed to a two-year, $2.5 million deal with a club option for 2001. But Wren confirmed last night that a contract never was signed because Hernandez failed his physical.Still in need of a right-handed setup man, the Orioles agreed to terms Friday with free agent Heathcliff Slocumb on a one-year deal.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | September 27, 1994
Q: Our 10-year-old has not been herself since school started. She's usually full of energy and eager to talk. Now she doesn't want to go to her dancing lesson or to soccer practice, even though she loved to this summer. She wants to go to bed even before she finishes her homework. She says things are fine at school, she's just tired. I'm worried she's sick.A: We are inclined to think the answer lies with your daughter's mental, rather than her physical, health. The fact that your daughter's behavior changed when school started may be an important clue.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Evening Sun Staff | November 19, 1991
BOWIE -- A month ago, after finally reaching agreement on a contract buyout from the Sacramento Kings that guarantees him $5 million over the next eight years, Ralph Sampson went home, climbed into his king-sized bed and stayed there a whole day."My wife thought I was sick," said Sampson, now a 7-foot-4 free agent, who underwent a tryout yesterday for Washington Bullets coach Wes Unseld and general manager John Nash."I spent 17 years playing basketball," said the former All-American from Virginia.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | October 1, 2004
JOAN FINN had just returned to her Rosedale home after dropping off her daughter, Megan, at field hockey practice at Overlea High on Saturday morning. She probably hadn't had enough time to hang up the car keys and get a cup of coffee when the phone rang. On the other end of the line was one of Megan's teammates, telling Joan and her husband, Joe, to come back to the school. Now. Megan was in trouble. The first thought the Finns had was that Megan had passed out. Teenagers always overstate things, they figured.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2001
The agent for outfielder Juan Gonzalez confirmed last night that the Orioles have engaged in "very preliminary discussions" about signing the two-time Most Valuable Player, with no offer being made thus far. Jeff Moorad has informed all interested teams that talks involving Gonzalez, who became a free agent after his one-year deal expired with the Cleveland Indians, won't resume until after Tuesday. "The Orioles are one of the teams that I've communicated that to," Moorad said. Moorad wouldn't elaborate on negotiations with other clubs, but an industry source said the agent has received two firm offers for Gonzalez, with the New York Mets believed to be one of the teams.
NEWS
August 29, 2001
Volunteers sought for Promise to Keep mentoring program Family and Children's Services is seeking volunteers for Promise to Keep, a program that coordinates mentoring relationships for children in Howard County. Promise to Keep also seeks to link mentors from the business community with schools to help improve student performance. Mentors usually meet weekly with the children and commit to maintain the relationship for a calendar or school year. Family and Children's Services, a nonprofit organization, is at the Family Life Center in Wilde Lake Village Center, Columbia.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | January 17, 1999
As Orioles general manager Frank Wren continues to retool the Orioles' bullpen, he remains uncertain whether Xavier Hernandez will be one of the components.Last month, Hernandez, a free agent, agreed to a two-year, $2.5 million deal with a club option for 2001. But Wren confirmed last night that a contract never was signed because Hernandez failed his physical.Still in need of a right-handed setup man, the Orioles agreed to terms Friday with free agent Heathcliff Slocumb on a one-year deal.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 31, 1997
I turned 50, which is really not so old. A lot of very famous people accomplished great things after 50. For example, it was during the post-50 phase of his life that the brilliant physicist Albert Einstein produced the vast majority of his drool.But still, when you're 50, you're definitely "getting up there," so I decided I'd better go in for my annual physical examination, which is something I do approximately every seven to nine years. keep my physicals spaced out because my doctor, Curt, who is ordinarily a terrific guy, has a tendency to put on a scary rubber glove and make sudden lunges at my personal region.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | September 27, 1994
Q: Our 10-year-old has not been herself since school started. She's usually full of energy and eager to talk. Now she doesn't want to go to her dancing lesson or to soccer practice, even though she loved to this summer. She wants to go to bed even before she finishes her homework. She says things are fine at school, she's just tired. I'm worried she's sick.A: We are inclined to think the answer lies with your daughter's mental, rather than her physical, health. The fact that your daughter's behavior changed when school started may be an important clue.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 31, 1997
I turned 50, which is really not so old. A lot of very famous people accomplished great things after 50. For example, it was during the post-50 phase of his life that the brilliant physicist Albert Einstein produced the vast majority of his drool.But still, when you're 50, you're definitely "getting up there," so I decided I'd better go in for my annual physical examination, which is something I do approximately every seven to nine years. keep my physicals spaced out because my doctor, Curt, who is ordinarily a terrific guy, has a tendency to put on a scary rubber glove and make sudden lunges at my personal region.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2001
The agent for outfielder Juan Gonzalez confirmed last night that the Orioles have engaged in "very preliminary discussions" about signing the two-time Most Valuable Player, with no offer being made thus far. Jeff Moorad has informed all interested teams that talks involving Gonzalez, who became a free agent after his one-year deal expired with the Cleveland Indians, won't resume until after Tuesday. "The Orioles are one of the teams that I've communicated that to," Moorad said. Moorad wouldn't elaborate on negotiations with other clubs, but an industry source said the agent has received two firm offers for Gonzalez, with the New York Mets believed to be one of the teams.
NEWS
April 15, 1994
Legal Aid Goes OnThe writer is executive director of the Legal Aid Bureau.Holy WeekNo local TV stations scheduled any Christian programming during Holy Week '94. This is not right. Holy Week is the most solemn and sacred week in the church year.Baltimore probably has more Christian churches than any city of its size. In past years Christian movies and programs during Holy Week could be found on local stations.Why not this year? Is this just another media attempt to make Christianity appear as a non-entity?
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Evening Sun Staff | November 19, 1991
BOWIE -- A month ago, after finally reaching agreement on a contract buyout from the Sacramento Kings that guarantees him $5 million over the next eight years, Ralph Sampson went home, climbed into his king-sized bed and stayed there a whole day."My wife thought I was sick," said Sampson, now a 7-foot-4 free agent, who underwent a tryout yesterday for Washington Bullets coach Wes Unseld and general manager John Nash."I spent 17 years playing basketball," said the former All-American from Virginia.
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