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Physical Evidence

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February 7, 2008
Brian McNamee's lawyers said yesterday that they gave federal prosecutors physical evidence backing the personal trainer's allegation that Roger Clemens used performance-enhancing drugs. "I think this is a significant point in the case. We believe that this is significant corroboration," said McNamee's lead lawyer, Earl Ward. McNamee's side turned over syringes with Clemens' blood to Internal Revenue Service Special Agent Jeff Novitzky in early January, a person familiar with the evidence said, speaking to the Associated Press on condition of anonymity.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
Not long after his son was stabbed to death outside his apartment in Hampstead, Richard DeMario heard that police had arrested a suspect, and soon enough it seemed to him they had a strong case. The man had confessed in a video recording and left behind a trail of physical evidence, including a knife said to have been used in the killing and a shirt that prosecutors said was stained with the son's blood. No jury will see the evidence against Russell S. Laderer Jr., who was charged with first- and second-degree murder, and Cassandra L. Glover, charged as an accessory after the fact.
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NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN REPORTER | May 20, 2008
An investigating officer for the Navy has recommended dropping rape charges against a Naval Academy student accused of assaulting a female midshipman in her dormitory room, pointing to what he called "an almost complete lack of physical evidence" in the case. Midshipman Mark A. Calvanico, 21, of Secaucus, N.J., should not face a court-martial, Lt. John E. Clady wrote in a May 5 report, released yesterday by the defendant's lawyer. Clady instead recommended an administrative hearing for Calvanico that could result in his dismissal from the academy for failing to meet curfew, being drunk and disorderly, and other offenses.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun reporter | June 4, 2008
A Naval Academy midshipman has been cleared of charges that he raped a female student in her dorm room in October, the military college announced yesterday, pointing to a Navy investigative report that found an "almost complete lack of physical evidence." Midshipman Mark A. Calvanico, 21, of Secaucus, N.J., will not face a court-martial on charges of rape, indecent assault, indecent acts and conduct unbecoming an officer, the academy said in a news release. Calvanico could still face disciplinary action through the academy's administrative conduct system, a college spokeswoman said.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Roger Twigg and Richard Irwin and Roger Twigg,Staff Writers | September 3, 1992
City homicide detectives today were holding an 18-year-old man in connection with Monday's fatal stabbing and rape of a woman in her Wakefield-area apartment.The man was being interrogated in connection with the death of Kacynthia Maria Clark, 28, whose body was found Monday morning in her apartment at the Windsor Forest complex at Windsor Mill Road and Forest Park Avenue.The murder victim, the mother of a 6-year-old girl, was a secretary in the state attorney general's office. Her daughter was at home when the attack occurred.
NEWS
By Karen Freifeld and Karen Freifeld,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 2002
NEW YORK - A Manhattan judge yesterday gave prosecutors until Dec. 5 to declare whether they believe the convictions of five young men in a 1989 Central Park jogger attack should be overturned. State Supreme Court Justice Charles Tejada said he was granting the Manhattan district attorney's request for more time to reinvestigate the rape and beating of a 28-year-old investment banker. "What?" one woman shouted from the spectators' gallery in a courtroom overflowing with the men's relatives, protesters and the media.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | August 6, 1995
Maryland's Court of Special Appeals has overturned a Carroll County man's conviction for the sexual abuse of children. The XTC man's 145-year prison term was one of the longest abuse sentences in state history.The state's second-highest court ruled Thursday that the trial judge should not have allowed a doctor to testify that most children don't lie about such abuse.The man -- whose name is being withheld to protect the privacy of his victims -- was convicted in July 1994 of molesting nine children, two of them his own, over a five-year period.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2004
The Dundalk man accused of killing two prostitutes and dumping their naked bodies on city streets will testify today, the only defense witness expected in a case built largely on circumstantial evidence. John Patrick Garcia, 36, of the 7400 block of Alvah Ave. is on trial in Baltimore Circuit Court in the strangulation of Melody Brock, 33, in April 2002 and Danielle Fell, 18, a month later. Brock's body was found propped against a dirt hill in the 2200 block of Newkirk St. Fell's body was sprawled over a curb in the 1300 block of Baylis St. If convicted, Garcia could be sentenced to life without parole.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg and Roger Twigg,Staff Writer Staff writer Richard Irwin contributed to this article | September 4, 1992
An 18-year-old man was charged yesterday with the rape and murder of a West Baltimore woman whose 6-year-old daughter listened to the attack from another room.Police said the man occasionally resided in the same apartment building in the 4900 block of Challedon Road where the victim lived, but he apparently knew her only by sight.Clayton Haywood Boone was charged with first-degree murder, rape, robbery and a weapons violation after detectives questioned him Wednesday night about the death Monday of Kacynthia Maria Clark.
NEWS
By Julian E. Barnes and Julian E. Barnes,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 19, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon paved the way for trials of detainees being held at Guantanamo Bay yesterday, issuing new rules that activate the nation's controversial law on interrogating and prosecuting terrorism prisoners. With the rules in place, the military plans to charge between 60 and 80 of the about 395 detainees at Guantanamo Bay. Trials are likely to begin this spring, officials said, but it is unlikely the so-called "high value" detainees formerly held by the CIA will be among the first to be given a hearing.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN REPORTER | May 20, 2008
An investigating officer for the Navy has recommended dropping rape charges against a Naval Academy student accused of assaulting a female midshipman in her dormitory room, pointing to what he called "an almost complete lack of physical evidence" in the case. Midshipman Mark A. Calvanico, 21, of Secaucus, N.J., should not face a court-martial, Lt. John E. Clady wrote in a May 5 report, released yesterday by the defendant's lawyer. Clady instead recommended an administrative hearing for Calvanico that could result in his dismissal from the academy for failing to meet curfew, being drunk and disorderly, and other offenses.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | February 8, 2008
Of course, those contentions are that McNamee injected Clemens with steroids and human growth hormone 16 times in 1998, 2000 and 2001. The physical evidence that McNamee is said to have handed over to investigators are syringes and gauze pads with traces of Clemens' blood. Reportedly, McNamee produced the material about a month ago. It's all vaguely reminiscent of Monica Lewinsky preserving Bill Clinton's DNA evidence on the infamous blue dress that helped prove the two had inappropriate moments together.
SPORTS
February 7, 2008
Brian McNamee's lawyers said yesterday that they gave federal prosecutors physical evidence backing the personal trainer's allegation that Roger Clemens used performance-enhancing drugs. "I think this is a significant point in the case. We believe that this is significant corroboration," said McNamee's lead lawyer, Earl Ward. McNamee's side turned over syringes with Clemens' blood to Internal Revenue Service Special Agent Jeff Novitzky in early January, a person familiar with the evidence said, speaking to the Associated Press on condition of anonymity.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 22, 2007
You don't know what it's like, and neither do I. But we can imagine. I've always thought it must feel like being buried alive. Lungs starving, lying in blackness, pounding on the coffin lid with dirt showering down, no one hearing your cries. Or maybe it's like locked-in syndrome, a condition where you lose muscle control - can't move a finger, turn your head, speak. Your body entombs you. You scream within, but no one hears. Something like that, I think. Something where you're trapped, claustrophobic, unable to believe what is happening, unable to make anyone hear you. That's how it must feel to be an innocent person on death row as execution day draws close.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 15, 2007
ATLANTA -- It was a Friday night in a rough part of town when Officer Mark A. MacPhail of the Savannah Police Department showed up to work his second job, moonlighting as a security officer for the Greyhound bus station. A few hours later, early on a Saturday morning in August 1989, MacPhail was shot and killed as he tried to break up a fight over a can of beer. He never drew his weapon. The man convicted of shooting the officer that night in 1989, Troy A. Davis, is likely to be the focus of an unusual clemency hearing before the Georgia Board of Pardons and Paroles.
NEWS
By Julian E. Barnes and Julian E. Barnes,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 19, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon paved the way for trials of detainees being held at Guantanamo Bay yesterday, issuing new rules that activate the nation's controversial law on interrogating and prosecuting terrorism prisoners. With the rules in place, the military plans to charge between 60 and 80 of the about 395 detainees at Guantanamo Bay. Trials are likely to begin this spring, officials said, but it is unlikely the so-called "high value" detainees formerly held by the CIA will be among the first to be given a hearing.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1996
A Howard County jury deadlocked over whether to convict a Prince George's man of rape Friday, after the alleged victim testified in Circuit Court that she fabricated the accusation.After deliberating four hours, the jury decided to convict Alvin Crook, who now lives in Landover, of battery and lesser sex offense charges. He could receive up to 31 years in prison when he is sentenced Aug. 2.His girlfriend initially told police that Crook had raped and beaten her -- at one point, behind Abiding Savior Lutheran Church in Owen Brown in August.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer | October 30, 1993
A convicted sex offender accused this week of kidnapping and sexually abusing a 13-year-old boy was charged last night with the murder of an 11-year-old boy last December. Earlier homicide charges in last year's case had been dropped for lack of evidence.Detective D. Martin Disney said last night that, after a lengthy interview, Warren C. Berry, 30, was charged with the murder of Michael Shawn Gasque.Police acknowledged for the first time that the 11-year-old had been sexually assaulted before he was killed.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,sun reporter | September 21, 2006
A correctional officer testified in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday that he saw one of his former co-workers stomping a detainee during a melee at the downtown booking center last year that ended with the prisoner beaten to death. The officer, Okechkwu Okeke, said he yelled at Dameon C. Woods to back off from Raymond K. Smoot in the May 25 fracas at the Central Booking and Intake Center. Woods, along with Nathan D. Colbert and James L. Hatcher, have been charged with second-degree murder.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 3, 2004
In 2002, at a crucial juncture on the path to war, senior members of the Bush administration gave a series of speeches and interviews in which they asserted that Saddam Hussein was rebuilding his nuclear weapons program. In a speech to veterans that August, Vice President Dick Cheney said Hussein could have an atomic bomb "fairly soon." President Bush, addressing the United Nations the next month, said there was "little doubt" about Hussein's appetite for nuclear arms. The U.S. intelligence community had not yet concluded that Iraq was rebuilding its nuclear weapons program.
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