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By Dan Appenfeller, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2013
One thing kept Jocelyn Wheeler going June 30 as she sped to hop through laundry baskets, mummify her teammate in cloth and haul that teammate on her shoulders through a mile-long stretch. It was her daughter, and her teammate for the day, 10-year-old Alexandra. The two were in the thick of the Great Amazing Race, a mile course filled with zany obstacles and tasks, such as using wet sponges to fill buckets and a whole lot of piggyback riding. And today, it's making its inaugural stop in Maryland, hitting Susquehanna State Park in Havre de Grace.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 14, 2014
New research suggests that Americans aren't obese because we eat too much. It's because we exercise too little. And by too little I mean, not at all. And whatever exercise we get peaks before the age of 10 - and perhaps as early as 2 - and is in steady decline after that, according to another study. Researchers at Stanford University Medical Center examined 22 years of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a long-term project of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
At Germantown Elementary School in Annapolis, students receive physical education once a week. Officially, that is. Unofficially, students are engaging in the same level of activity as their "go-outside-and-play" parents of previous generations. At recess, before classes and after school — and in some cases even during classroom instruction — youngsters are getting workouts by playing traditional games, learning new ones and creating their own spinoff versions. Germantown Elementary is among the first schools in the area to implement a San Diego-based physical education program called SPARK, which stresses to children the importance of physical fitness, then provides grade-level equipment and instruction to back it up. SPARK officials said the program began in 1989 as a result of a study supported by the Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health and San Diego State University.
SPORTS
By Dan Appenfeller, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2013
One thing kept Jocelyn Wheeler going June 30 as she sped to hop through laundry baskets, mummify her teammate in cloth and haul that teammate on her shoulders through a mile-long stretch. It was her daughter, and her teammate for the day, 10-year-old Alexandra. The two were in the thick of the Great Amazing Race, a mile course filled with zany obstacles and tasks, such as using wet sponges to fill buckets and a whole lot of piggyback riding. And today, it's making its inaugural stop in Maryland, hitting Susquehanna State Park in Havre de Grace.
NEWS
March 14, 2012
I disagree with those who support building a school in Mays Chapel North, where a wonderful walking path and athletic fields are currently located. As a long-time resident of Mays Chapel and a senior citizen, I have enjoyed the benefit of having a tranquil and safe area to walk. Not only is the park convenient to the many senior citizens living in Mays Chapel, but it is used by others in the surrounding residential communities. As a physical therapist with over five decades of experience, I have seen the detrimental effects of a lack of exercise.
EXPLORE
January 7, 2013
Howard County is missing the mark on childhood obesity. If Howard County really wants to reduce childhood obesity, they need to work with our school system to protect the health of our students. They will need to protect time designated for recess and increase the time allotted for physical education in school across all grades. The current requirements are creating the obesity epidemic and failing our students. They need to allow opportunities for students with poor grades to participate in after-school physical activities. Howard County should look to New York state's requirements for physical education guidelines, which require 120 minutes per week.
NEWS
March 28, 2011
For too many Marylanders, basketball is a game to be watched on television, running is the circumstance of their computers and hiking is what the General Assembly does to taxes around this time of year. For the firmly rooted couch potato, exercise is low on the to-do list. It's a chronic and worsening problem. A recent report from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention documents, county-by-county, just how bad it has become. Nationally, about one-quarter of adults do not spend free time being physically active or participating in such things as walking for exercise, golfing, playing tennis or running.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,Special to The Sun | July 16, 1996
When was the last time you had some fun playing physical games with your kids, grandkids or even your neighbors' kids? Remember yard games like dodge ball, SPUD, red rover, croquet, horseshoes, badminton and just plain tag? How long has it been since you walked to the store for an ice cream cone, or rode your bike to get the morning paper?In the world of "everything old is new again," playing with kids will make a comeback if the surgeon general has anything to say about it.The just-released Surgeon General's Report on Physical Activity and Health has some encouraging things to say about the benefits of joyous movement, and some frightening facts about our resistance to taking advantage of it.The report is focused on disease prevention, and reports primarily on the benefits of endurance activity (walking, cycling, lawn mowing, leaf raking)
NEWS
December 1, 2002
The Carroll County Health Department sponsored its fourth annual Project ACES program in October for children in the county's elementary schools. ACES (Active Children Excel in School) is a physical activity challenge aimed at improving health and fitness by increasing daily physical activity. Pupils kept track of their physical activity for a two-week period. The goal was to exercise for 30 minutes or more each day. Activities that met the requirements included walking, playing, riding bicycles, dancing, participating in sports, or doing yardwork or housework.
NEWS
March 29, 2011
Thanks for your concern about the rising levels of obesity and the lack of infrastructure, programs, policy and funding to keep people, both children and adults, physically active ("Getting exercised over exercise," March 28). On January 3, I participated in the Governor's Moving Maryland Forum on Education — K-12 Breakout Session, led by Alvin Thornton. I am extremely disappointed that the governor's staff deleted the group's recommendation for a daily recess for all elementary school students from the original summary Mr. Thornton presented at the conclusion of the forum.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
At Germantown Elementary School in Annapolis, students receive physical education once a week. Officially, that is. Unofficially, students are engaging in the same level of activity as their "go-outside-and-play" parents of previous generations. At recess, before classes and after school — and in some cases even during classroom instruction — youngsters are getting workouts by playing traditional games, learning new ones and creating their own spinoff versions. Germantown Elementary is among the first schools in the area to implement a San Diego-based physical education program called SPARK, which stresses to children the importance of physical fitness, then provides grade-level equipment and instruction to back it up. SPARK officials said the program began in 1989 as a result of a study supported by the Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health and San Diego State University.
EXPLORE
January 7, 2013
Howard County is missing the mark on childhood obesity. If Howard County really wants to reduce childhood obesity, they need to work with our school system to protect the health of our students. They will need to protect time designated for recess and increase the time allotted for physical education in school across all grades. The current requirements are creating the obesity epidemic and failing our students. They need to allow opportunities for students with poor grades to participate in after-school physical activities. Howard County should look to New York state's requirements for physical education guidelines, which require 120 minutes per week.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
Michael Phelps can swim. Michael Phelps can golf. And finally here's a physical activity that Michael Phelps is, frankly, pretty bad at: crowd surfing. The Olympian tried to ride the waves of a crowd the other night at XS nightclub in Las Vegas. The crowd was into it, shouting, "Michael! Michael!" And Phelps was game. But after mere seconds, the ride was over and Phelps was on the floor. Don't worry, reports say he wasn't hurt. Perhaps just a bit embarrassed. Party foul? Or just a chance to find the Bob Bowman of crowd surfing, train and come back in four years.
NEWS
March 14, 2012
I disagree with those who support building a school in Mays Chapel North, where a wonderful walking path and athletic fields are currently located. As a long-time resident of Mays Chapel and a senior citizen, I have enjoyed the benefit of having a tranquil and safe area to walk. Not only is the park convenient to the many senior citizens living in Mays Chapel, but it is used by others in the surrounding residential communities. As a physical therapist with over five decades of experience, I have seen the detrimental effects of a lack of exercise.
NEWS
October 13, 2011
I read with great interest the article regarding the Roland Park Middle School parents' concerns in the article, "All work and no play for kids" (Sept. 24). It is so reassuring to hear about parents who are engaged in their children's schools and especially when they are taking an interest in their physical activity level. Often times, school leaders may think that academics and physical activity are mutually exclusive. The research on this issue is very clear and has shown time and time again that those students who have an opportunity to be active during the school day have better attendance, academic achievement, relationships and overall health.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2011
Second baseman Brian Roberts will not participate in baseball activities for the next two weeks and will be sidelined for a total of at least three weeks after seeing a concussion specialist in Pittsburgh on Tuesday. "They recommend he not do any physical activity for two weeks and then get re-evaluated," Orioles president of baseball operations Andy MacPhail said. "He could come quickly after that or not, they don't know. But right now, the prescription is two weeks of inactivity and then re-evaluate.
NEWS
May 10, 2009
The Columbia Association has launched its fifth annual "Get Active Howard County," a 10-week effort to encourage Howard County residents to be more active by incorporating 30 minutes of physical activity into their day, at least five days a week. The program is free and open to anyone living or working in Howard County. To register: GetActiveHowardCounty.org. Participants can pick up a paper log at any Howard County library branch or any of the 10 village centers. The program runs through June 7. Information: Carol Wasser, 410-715-5523 or Carol.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman | March 28, 2008
The Maryland Senate advanced a measure yesterday that would create a task force to study mandating a minimum amount of physical activity or education for students in public schools. The bill would have required schools to provide students in kindergarten through eighth grade with at least 2 1/2 hours of physical activity a week, but lawmakers changed the bill to study the issue, noting concerns that it would be too expensive and require the hiring of more teachers. The bill also would have required high school students to complete two years of physical education to graduate.
NEWS
March 29, 2011
Thanks for your concern about the rising levels of obesity and the lack of infrastructure, programs, policy and funding to keep people, both children and adults, physically active ("Getting exercised over exercise," March 28). On January 3, I participated in the Governor's Moving Maryland Forum on Education — K-12 Breakout Session, led by Alvin Thornton. I am extremely disappointed that the governor's staff deleted the group's recommendation for a daily recess for all elementary school students from the original summary Mr. Thornton presented at the conclusion of the forum.
NEWS
March 28, 2011
For too many Marylanders, basketball is a game to be watched on television, running is the circumstance of their computers and hiking is what the General Assembly does to taxes around this time of year. For the firmly rooted couch potato, exercise is low on the to-do list. It's a chronic and worsening problem. A recent report from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention documents, county-by-county, just how bad it has become. Nationally, about one-quarter of adults do not spend free time being physically active or participating in such things as walking for exercise, golfing, playing tennis or running.
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