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By ELINOR KLIVANS and ELINOR KLIVANS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 1, 2006
Potpies have long been stars of the comfort-food season. With new toppings as an alternative to the traditional flaky crust, you can lighten their toll on both your waistline and your cooking time. Heaped with moist fillings that bubble under a crisp corn-bread topping or maybe a soft biscuit crust, potpies have a universal appeal. They use readily available ingredients, often make a one-dish meal and can serve a single person or a crowd. Most can be put together at your leisure and baked later in the day, and many can even be frozen, defrosted and popped in the oven to bake.
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EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | March 7, 2012
Although winter in these parts hasn't been a terrible hardship this year, it's still pleasant to anticipate more moderate temperatures when you can put away the winter Crocs and start looking for your sandals. And who can blame you if you jump the proverbial gun and invite friends in for a petite soiree with a springtime theme. To celebrate the onset of a purportedly milder season, we present this simple - emphasis on simple - seasonal dinner for eight. Begin with goat cheese triangles used as a "garnish" on a salad of spring greens.
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FEATURES
By EATING WELL MAGAZINE | February 12, 1997
Napoleon Bonaparte, well-known emperor and one-time valentine of Josephine, once proclaimed: "An army marches on its stomach." This novel napoleon is surely the dessert he had in mind: juicy sauteed pears and figs layered between crisp triangles of phyllo in a sweet pool of ruby-hued raspberry coulis. As for that other dessert called napoleon? It was named for some bakers in Naples. Our dessert is born of love.Pear and fig napoleonsMakes 6 napoleonsPHYLLO LAYERS:1/4 cup granulated sugar1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamonpinch of ground cloves2 teaspoons butter, melted2 teaspoons vegetable oil, preferably canola4 sheets phyllo dough (14-by-18 inches)
NEWS
By MARGE PERRY and MARGE PERRY,NEWSDAY | April 30, 2006
Classic Greek ingredients, such as yogurt, honey and phyllo dough, meld with simple cooking methods and seasonal spring flavors for dishes you'll want to make. Place the cups on dessert plates and fill them just before serving. You can also make this with vanilla yogurt. HONEY-DRIZZLED YOGURT IN PHYLLO CUPS MAKES 12 SERVINGS 16 ounces plain nonfat yogurt 12 sheets phyllo dough, thawed 6 tablespoons melted butter 6 teaspoons granulated sugar 1 / 4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 12 tablespoons honey 12 sprigs fresh mint Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
FEATURES
By Charles Perry, and Charles Perry,,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 4, 1999
In the '60s, foodies discovered phyllo. In the '70s, they started to get a little tired of it.Understandably. They'd made pan after pan of baklava and spanakopita. They invented all sorts of flaky brie balls and cunning hors d'oeuvre cups in their quest to take phyllo to the limit.So when California cuisine exploded onto the scene in the '80s, phyllo was ungraciously ignored, like the guest who shows up at the party a couple of hours before the crowd. But foodies actually had gotten nowhere near the end of its possibilities.
FEATURES
By Kathy Casey and Kathy Casey,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 15, 1998
It's spring! Things are starting to pop up -- from tender asparagus to lacy pea vines to rich morels. Tart rhubarb stalks are poking their heads out of the ground, waiting for the sun to shine upon them and brush-stroke them to a brilliant pink.When I was a kid there was a neighbor's garden right up against the playground's cyclone fence, with openings just big enough for small hands. We dared each other to reach through the fence and pull up a super-tart, underripe rhubarb stalk and take a big bite.
FEATURES
By EATING WELL MAGAZINE | July 31, 1996
As more and more Americans return to the pleasures of the table -- and a bit of dessert is no longer taboo -- pastry chefs are increasingly finding themselves in the celebrity spotlight previously reserved for executive chefs.There is a new surge of creativity in the profession. The rococo dessert spectacles of the '80s are giving way to sleeker, more sculptural, self-assured presentations.And as patrons have increasingly requested lower-fat desserts, American pastry chefs have added innovations in the art of low-fat cooking to their long list of talents.
FEATURES
September 19, 1990
These strudels are packed with chili for a delicious, make-ahead meal. Phyllo dough is easy to work with as long as you keep the unused sheets covered with a damp paper towel. This recipe makes eight strudels.Chili Strudels2 tablespoons vegetable oil1 cup chopped onions3/4 pound sausage, chopped1 1/2 pounds ground beef1 28-ounce can crushed Italian tomatoes3 tablespoons chili powder2 tablespoons ground cumin2 to 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce1 12-ounce package frozen chopped vegetables, such as red and green bell peppersSalt and freshly ground black pepper to taste12 phyllo leaves, defrosted according to package directions6 tablespoons unsalted butter or margarine1 cup coarsely shredded Cheddar or Monterey Jack cheeseTomatoes, black olives, sliced green onions, for garnishIn large, heavy casserole, heat the oil until hot over medium high heat.
FEATURES
By Marlene Sorosky and Marlene Sorosky,Special to The Sun | April 17, 1994
More and more, the line between our personal and business lives is narrowing. Today a dinner party in your home might well be a business-based affair where you're entertaining associates from the company you work for. Business or personal, you want the occasion to be a knockout. The trick is to pull it off without knocking yourself out.One of my favorite company dinners is poisson en croute -- or fillets in phyllo -- consisting of two kinds of fish in a golden pastry case.Phyllo has taken a bad rap in times past.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | March 7, 2012
Although winter in these parts hasn't been a terrible hardship this year, it's still pleasant to anticipate more moderate temperatures when you can put away the winter Crocs and start looking for your sandals. And who can blame you if you jump the proverbial gun and invite friends in for a petite soiree with a springtime theme. To celebrate the onset of a purportedly milder season, we present this simple - emphasis on simple - seasonal dinner for eight. Begin with goat cheese triangles used as a "garnish" on a salad of spring greens.
NEWS
By ELINOR KLIVANS and ELINOR KLIVANS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 1, 2006
Potpies have long been stars of the comfort-food season. With new toppings as an alternative to the traditional flaky crust, you can lighten their toll on both your waistline and your cooking time. Heaped with moist fillings that bubble under a crisp corn-bread topping or maybe a soft biscuit crust, potpies have a universal appeal. They use readily available ingredients, often make a one-dish meal and can serve a single person or a crowd. Most can be put together at your leisure and baked later in the day, and many can even be frozen, defrosted and popped in the oven to bake.
FEATURES
By Tracy Sahler and Tracy Sahler,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 14, 2001
Inspired by the baklava she makes for her church, Sally A. Brassfield of California, Md., wrapped rockfish fillets inside crunchy phyllo dough to triumph over nine other finalists to win the fourth annual Maryland Rockfish Cooking Contest. Shallots and garlic helped flavor her hearty - although labor-intensive - dish, while pine nuts gave her Savory Phyllo-Encrusted Rockfish an exotic crunch. She won $500 and a silver bowl at the contest held Feb. 3 at the Roland E. Powell Convention Center in Ocean City.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | January 30, 2000
The celebrated 19th-century French gourmand Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin is the author of the often-quoted lines, "The discovery of a new dish does more for the happiness of mankind than the discovery of a star." I couldn't agree more with his statement, but I might rephrase it for contemporary purposes by saying that "The discovery of a new food product (especially one with convenience features) is more important to those of us who entertain than landing an Explorer on Mars." That's how I felt this past week as I prepared appetizers for a small potluck dinner.
FEATURES
By Charles Perry, and Charles Perry,,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 4, 1999
In the '60s, foodies discovered phyllo. In the '70s, they started to get a little tired of it.Understandably. They'd made pan after pan of baklava and spanakopita. They invented all sorts of flaky brie balls and cunning hors d'oeuvre cups in their quest to take phyllo to the limit.So when California cuisine exploded onto the scene in the '80s, phyllo was ungraciously ignored, like the guest who shows up at the party a couple of hours before the crowd. But foodies actually had gotten nowhere near the end of its possibilities.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 28, 1999
When planning dinner parties during the winter, I find that choosing a dessert is often more of a challenge because fresh fruit is not as abundant.Recently, however, I created a confection using dried fruit that made a perfect finale for a small dinner served to good friends on a chilly evening.I made phyllo baskets by cutting phyllo sheets into squares, molding them into muffin tins, and then baking them to a rich, golden brown.The baskets and the filling can be made two days ahead. At serving time, quickly reheat the baskets in the oven and the filling on top of the stove before assembling the dessert.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 27, 1998
For more than a decade, my husband and I have invited a small group of friends to dinner on New Year's Eve. It's my favorite night of the year to entertain, and, typically, I spend the days before cooking and preparing for this celebration.This year, however, we will be out of town up until the day of the fete, so I need to prepare as much as possible in advance.As a main course, I've decided on a vegetable couscous served with cumin and pepper lamb chops. The vegetables for the couscous can be made ahead, frozen and reheated at serving time.
FEATURES
By Susan Herr | June 16, 1993
These low-fat phyllo appetizers work beautifully fo entertaining because they can be prepared in advance and refrigerated or frozen.Poppy and sesame seed strawsMakes about 5 dozen straws2 tablespoons poppy seeds2 tablespoons sesame seeds1 large egg white2 tablespoons olive oil1/4 teaspoon salt6 sheets phyllo dough (14-by-18 inches)Heat oven to 400 degrees. Lightly coat two baking sheets with non-stick cooking spray or line with parchment paper. Heat a small heavy skillet over medium heat.
FEATURES
By Tracy Sahler and Tracy Sahler,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 4, 1998
OCEAN CITY -- Dee T. Van Nest of Annapolis perched stuffed rockfish fillets on phyllo sailboats Saturday to win the first Maryland Rockfish Celebration cooking contest, held during the annual East Coast Commercial Fishermen's and Aquaculture Trade Expo here.Van Nest's Stuffed Striper Under Sail was the most complex of the 10 finalists' recipes and received the highest marks from the panel of five judges because of the dish's originality and taste. Van Nest also won the 1997 crab-cooking contest at the National Hard Crab Derby & Fair in Crisfield, and placed third last year in a crab cook-off at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels.
FEATURES
By Kathy Casey and Kathy Casey,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 15, 1998
It's spring! Things are starting to pop up -- from tender asparagus to lacy pea vines to rich morels. Tart rhubarb stalks are poking their heads out of the ground, waiting for the sun to shine upon them and brush-stroke them to a brilliant pink.When I was a kid there was a neighbor's garden right up against the playground's cyclone fence, with openings just big enough for small hands. We dared each other to reach through the fence and pull up a super-tart, underripe rhubarb stalk and take a big bite.
FEATURES
By Tracy Sahler and Tracy Sahler,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 4, 1998
OCEAN CITY -- Dee T. Van Nest of Annapolis perched stuffed rockfish fillets on phyllo sailboats Saturday to win the first Maryland Rockfish Celebration cooking contest, held during the annual East Coast Commercial Fishermen's and Aquaculture Trade Expo here.Van Nest's Stuffed Striper Under Sail was the most complex of the 10 finalists' recipes and received the highest marks from the panel of five judges because of the dish's originality and taste. Van Nest also won the 1997 crab-cooking contest at the National Hard Crab Derby & Fair in Crisfield, and placed third last year in a crab cook-off at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels.
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