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Phyllis Diller

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By Jack Lloyd and Jack Lloyd,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 24, 1993
Phyllis Diller has it -- the "spirit of 76," she says.Ms. Diller was talking about her age, but she's not ready to slow down. After all, the comedian had a slow start in show business and, as a late bloomer, Ms. Diller figures that she has some catching up to do.She's all over, performing in this country and abroad, making movies and appearing on television. Her rigorous schedule is now bringing Ms. Diller to Atlantic City, N.J., where she begins a six-day engagement at Harrah's Casino Hotel tomorrow.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
I hope those who know Joan Rivers only from her work the last couple of decades on shows like “Fashion Police” will take the time to read some of the appreciations that talk about who she used to be. Rivers, who died Thursday at age 81 after being on life support since Aug. 28, was a fearless, cutting-edge and transgressive comedian straight from Greenwich Village in the 1950s and '60s, who made it possible for the likes of Amy Schumer and...
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 22, 1990
The cartooning in ''The Nutcracker Prince'' is almost crude, but the animated feature, based on the story by E.T.A. Hoffman, goes by in a hurry, and the very small children who attended an advance screening sat very still for it. That may be the ultimate test.The film, the first full-length animated feature to be done by Lacewood Productions in Canada, also provides us with a very clear vision of the plot. Those who have sat through the ballet without knowing what was going on will know what is going on in the film.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 28, 1994
It's not exactly "Night of the Living Dead" or anything, but in addition to the usual Halloween-themed series episodes tonight, there's a prime-time guest appearance by Phyllis Diller.* "Family Matters" (8-8:30 p.m., Channel 13) -- The trick, in this Halloween episode, is that most of it takes place as a vampire story, with the Winslow parents as vampires and Urkel (Jaleel White) as a castle guest in danger of joining the undead. An eternal Urkel? Now THAT'S scary, boys and girls. ABC.* "Tales From the Crypt" (8-9 p.m., Channel 45)
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 28, 1994
It's not exactly "Night of the Living Dead" or anything, but in addition to the usual Halloween-themed series episodes tonight, there's a prime-time guest appearance by Phyllis Diller.* "Family Matters" (8-8:30 p.m., Channel 13) -- The trick, in this Halloween episode, is that most of it takes place as a vampire story, with the Winslow parents as vampires and Urkel (Jaleel White) as a castle guest in danger of joining the undead. An eternal Urkel? Now THAT'S scary, boys and girls. ABC.* "Tales From the Crypt" (8-9 p.m., Channel 45)
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By Clara G. Herrera and Clara G. Herrera,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | June 19, 1993
How many people can say they learned how to hold a proper garage sale from comedian Phyllis Diller?Frankly, anybody who's brave enough to admit it. She's done a videotape on how to run a garage sale. There are also several books by so-called experts at holding these homemade flea markets. They can tell you just how to get rid of your unwanted junk.If you're not the reading type, or would rather not sit in front of the television watching Phyllis Diller, one of the best ways to learn how to hold a garage sale is to go to some.
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By ELISE T. CHISOLM | September 20, 1994
I saw the ad in New Yorker magazine, it's usually there along with the clothes, gifts and fabulous vacation spots I can't afford unless I win the lottery. The ad makes me laugh every time.It read, "Sail with the Stars, the QE2 . . celebrities at sea . . . offers cruises from April to December . . . and appearing on the QE2 Shirley Jones . . . Bob Newhart . . . Neil Sedaka . . . Add this star power to all of the things to do on the QE2 and you're bound to have an unforgettable experience."I have to say I would not cross the street to hear or see Shirley Jones or Neil Sedaka.
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By Linda Lowe Morris | February 10, 1991
It goes way beyond understatement to say this place is somewhat different from most art galleries. Hugh Harrell's gallery on Auchentoroly Terrace is as far away in look and spirit from the fancy downtown galleries as a lively, working Paris atelier is from the IBM building.Here there are no stark and sterile white walls, no polished wood floors, no eyeball spotlights on slightly disembodied works of art. No manicured and suited sales associates whisper, "May I help you?"Instead Hugh Harrell himself gets up from whatever he's working on, opens the door and says, "Come on in."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
I hope those who know Joan Rivers only from her work the last couple of decades on shows like “Fashion Police” will take the time to read some of the appreciations that talk about who she used to be. Rivers, who died Thursday at age 81 after being on life support since Aug. 28, was a fearless, cutting-edge and transgressive comedian straight from Greenwich Village in the 1950s and '60s, who made it possible for the likes of Amy Schumer and...
NEWS
By From Sun news services | January 14, 2009
The funniest people don't take no for an answer - at least, they don't without a fight for their audience's yuks. Their policy has never been "invite 'em to laugh." It's "make 'em." This never-say-die zeal (and the laughter that results) is the unifying spirit of Make 'Em Laugh: The Funny Business of America, PBS' six-hour, century-spanning showcase of the nation's leading laugh-getters. Hosted by Billy Crystal, the series (two hours over three nights) blends history with performance and taps the expertise of more than 90 comedians, writers, producers and comic scholars.
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By ELISE T. CHISOLM | September 20, 1994
I saw the ad in New Yorker magazine, it's usually there along with the clothes, gifts and fabulous vacation spots I can't afford unless I win the lottery. The ad makes me laugh every time.It read, "Sail with the Stars, the QE2 . . celebrities at sea . . . offers cruises from April to December . . . and appearing on the QE2 Shirley Jones . . . Bob Newhart . . . Neil Sedaka . . . Add this star power to all of the things to do on the QE2 and you're bound to have an unforgettable experience."I have to say I would not cross the street to hear or see Shirley Jones or Neil Sedaka.
FEATURES
By Jack Lloyd and Jack Lloyd,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 24, 1993
Phyllis Diller has it -- the "spirit of 76," she says.Ms. Diller was talking about her age, but she's not ready to slow down. After all, the comedian had a slow start in show business and, as a late bloomer, Ms. Diller figures that she has some catching up to do.She's all over, performing in this country and abroad, making movies and appearing on television. Her rigorous schedule is now bringing Ms. Diller to Atlantic City, N.J., where she begins a six-day engagement at Harrah's Casino Hotel tomorrow.
FEATURES
By Clara G. Herrera and Clara G. Herrera,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | June 19, 1993
How many people can say they learned how to hold a proper garage sale from comedian Phyllis Diller?Frankly, anybody who's brave enough to admit it. She's done a videotape on how to run a garage sale. There are also several books by so-called experts at holding these homemade flea markets. They can tell you just how to get rid of your unwanted junk.If you're not the reading type, or would rather not sit in front of the television watching Phyllis Diller, one of the best ways to learn how to hold a garage sale is to go to some.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | February 10, 1991
It goes way beyond understatement to say this place is somewhat different from most art galleries. Hugh Harrell's gallery on Auchentoroly Terrace is as far away in look and spirit from the fancy downtown galleries as a lively, working Paris atelier is from the IBM building.Here there are no stark and sterile white walls, no polished wood floors, no eyeball spotlights on slightly disembodied works of art. No manicured and suited sales associates whisper, "May I help you?"Instead Hugh Harrell himself gets up from whatever he's working on, opens the door and says, "Come on in."
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 22, 1990
The cartooning in ''The Nutcracker Prince'' is almost crude, but the animated feature, based on the story by E.T.A. Hoffman, goes by in a hurry, and the very small children who attended an advance screening sat very still for it. That may be the ultimate test.The film, the first full-length animated feature to be done by Lacewood Productions in Canada, also provides us with a very clear vision of the plot. Those who have sat through the ballet without knowing what was going on will know what is going on in the film.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | May 14, 1994
"MacGyver" returns in a made-for-TV form, "Saturday Nigh Live" attempts to finish the season in fine form, and "Red Shoe Diaries" presents the fine form of Audie England.* "Bob Hope's Birthday Memories." (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- No sense waiting until the last minute -- or in 15 days, when Hope truly turns 91. As is the case with most recent Hope specials, there's a lot of reliance upon clips from previous years to help fill the hours. Guests this time, live and in blast-from-the-past footage, are scheduled to include Angie Dickinson, Phyllis Diller and Betty White.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2005
The golden era of comedy albums -- the late 1950s and 1960s -- began with comics such as Shelly Berman and Lenny Bruce. The classic "2000-Year-Old Man" routine from Carl Reiner and Mel Brooks made its debut on vinyl in 1960, as did recordings from the comedy team of Elaine May and Mike Nichols. Bob Newhart had back-to-back No. 1 comedy albums in the early 1960s, but it was a presidential impersonator who set a sales record. The First Family (1962) featured the late Vaughn Meader's indelible impersonation of President Kennedy.
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