Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPhotography
IN THE NEWS

Photography

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown and For The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
Some consider Baltimore Ravens star linebacker Ray Lewis, 37, an artist on the football field. But that's only one area where he expresses himself. You'll find creativity in how he presents himself -- he designs most of his suits -- and the world he sees around him in his photography -- both of which were on display at Maryland Art Place's "LUX" Gala. "The Sun Diaries" is a group of five photos Lewis took of his favorite subject, the sun. "My art really symbolizes something that man doesn't control.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Matt Corasanti was taking his gear off after a quick, after-work kayak outing in Fells Point when a frantic man ran up to him, saying his dog had fallen into the water and asking whether Corasanti could help him. Corasanti hopped back into his kayak, docked at the Canton Kayak Club's pier in the 1600 block of Thames St., and paddled toward the puppy, which was trying to scramble back over a concrete barrier and onto the dock. But he couldn't reach the puppy. So the 28-year-old Canton man slipped out of his kayak and into the harbor.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
At 2 a.m. one morning in March 2010, photographer David Hobby was wandering, awestruck, around a gilded palace in Southwest Asia as the royal guest of a monarch. "I thought to myself, 'Holy crap! I'm in the sultan's palace in Oman, and no one's even around,'" recalled the Ellicott City resident, who had been invited to the small Arab state to speak about Strobist.com, his photography website and blog. "I've been pinching myself for the last six years," said the 48-year-old married father of two teens.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
The Baltimore Museum of Art has received its most significant gift of contemporary photography in more than 25 years. Baltimore collectors Tom and Nancy O'Neil have given the institution two dozen color and black-and-white works by 19 important artists of our time, including Dawoud Bey, celebrated for his portrait photography, and Edward Burtynsky, whose photos document humanity's impact on the environment. Among others represented in the collection are Rodney Graham, Naoya Hatakeyama, Richard Misrach and James Welling.
NEWS
August 17, 2008
Nature photographer Michael Oberman, a resident of Harper's Choice, will teach beginning nature photography from 7:15 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. Sept. 8 and 15 at Slayton House in Wilde Lake Village Center. An outdoor photo shoot is planned for Sept. 13. Oberman's nature photos have appeared in national magazines and newspapers. www.howardcountymd.gov/oa/50+expo.htm.
NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 1, 2002
OAKLAND MILLS resident Bonnie Johnson has turned her passion for photography into a career. She had been taking pictures for 12 years, but found her niche after her children were born. Her daughter, Nara, is 10, and her son, Kade, is 7. "I took lots of pictures of my kids when they were small," Johnson said. "When they got into preschool, people started asking me to take pictures of their kids." That was the beginning of her photography business, simply called Bonnie Johnson Photography.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 14, 2000
Photography since 1970 has been dominated by two contradictory trends: one toward the "straight" tradition of modernist realism, the other toward the subversive, debunking pastiches of postmodernism. James Welling, whose meditative photographs of commonplace objects and everyday scenes are the subject of a major retrospective exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art, straddles the divide between these conflicting impulses with a serenity that seems completely natural and unforced. The exhibit covers Welling's work between 1974 and 1999, the equivalent of several photographic lifetimes for many fine art photographers, who usually can be expected to produce only about a decade's worth of truly original work during their careers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 17, 2006
GIRL'S NIGHT OUT / / Through Nov. 26 at Baltimore's Contemporary Museum, 100 W. Centre St. -- 410-783-5720 or www.contemporary.org.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 18, 2000
SEATTLE - Getty Images Inc., the largest provider of stock photographs and images to media companies, has signed an exclusive agreement to make photography from National Geographic magazine accessible through its Internet site. Financial terms weren't disclosed. The Seattle company will begin offering the National Geographic Image Collection, best known for photographs of travel, wildlife, adventure and scientific imagery, on its www.gettyone.com in the third quarter. Getty, whose biggest rival is Corbis Corp.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | November 4, 1997
Dorothea Lange's photos of migrant workers in the 1930s go right to the heart of the matter.Her "Children of Migrant Agricultural Workers in California (Children in Automobile)" (1937) shows three boys crowded together at the back window of a run-down-looking car (actually, it looks more like a truck). Their worried expressions show that poverty has aged them far beyond their years. Their confinement in the car symbolizes their confinement in the prison of poverty. They recall, ironically, the words on the Statue of Liberty, "Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2014
Jay Gould first got his hands on a camera when he was 6 years old, and he describes those first shots as "terrible. " [I] mostly captured roll after roll containing pictures of flashes on aquarium glass," said Gould, 31, who lives in Hampden. "I'm a geek and suspect that my early love of cameras was purely because it had a button and a lens that moved in and out. Things have changed, of course. Gould took his first photography class at age 16 and "finally committed to the medium" when he was almost done with college.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
At 2 a.m. one morning in March 2010, photographer David Hobby was wandering, awestruck, around a gilded palace in Southwest Asia as the royal guest of a monarch. "I thought to myself, 'Holy crap! I'm in the sultan's palace in Oman, and no one's even around,'" recalled the Ellicott City resident, who had been invited to the small Arab state to speak about Strobist.com, his photography website and blog. "I've been pinching myself for the last six years," said the 48-year-old married father of two teens.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2013
The first voice in Tennessee Williams' "The Glass Menagerie" belongs to Tom Wingfield, a budding poet trapped in a boring day job. Serving as guide through the playwright's exquisitely crafted layers of memory and anxiety, Tom dispenses "truth in the pleasant disguise of illusion. " For its season-opening production of this certified classic of the American stage, Everyman Theatre has cast one of its most versatile and gifted resident artists, Clinton Brandhagen, as Tom. "I had to read the play in high school," the Calgary-born Brandhagen, 36, said, "but I never looked at it again.
FEATURES
By Julianne Peeling | May 31, 2013
Kids are moving targets. Moms (and would-be photographers) know this all too well: Children and their special moments can be fleeting, making it tough to capture memories on camera, especially if that new DSLR camera itself remains a mystery. But steady aim can be taught. Nicole Renee, professional newborn photographer and owner of Nicole Renee Newborns, offers a solution to moms still fidgeting with fancy cameras. In her Shoot My Kids! workshops, Renee, who is one of just a handful of 100 percent digital newborn photographers in Baltimore, can teach even the novice photographer how to create beautiful family portraits.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | May 1, 2013
Cars are a defining aspect of the American landscape in John Petro's exhibit "Parked Outside the Door" at the Bernice Kish Gallery at Slayton House. Although people are rarely seen in these color photographs, cars appear in almost every shot. A typical photo features a single car parked near a single house, as if to emphasize that ours is a mobile culture. Indeed, there's even a shot depicting a red truck parked next to a mobile home in Cloverlick, W.Va. Ironically, though, Petro often takes photos of junked old cars that aren't going anywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley Monday announced something that had been widely known in Baltimore at least for the last two weeks: That the Netflix series "House of Cards" was back in town to film its second season. The White House Correspondents Dinner in Washington Saturday night opened with a spoof featuring Kevin Spacey that was filmed on the "House of Cards" set. And crew members have been working for the last two weeks inside the Baltimore Sun building on Calvert Street rebuilding the "House of Cards" newsroom set. But principal photography on the the second season officially started today, according to the Maryland Film Office.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 30, 2000
A recent working vacation reaffirmed my appreciation for the difficulties that emerging artists face in getting their work shown and reviewed. My experience stemmed from a basic photography course I took at the Maryland Institute, College of Art earlier this year. My project involved reprinting a portfolio of photographs I had taken some 25 years ago during a documentary project on urban poverty in the South American city of Medellin, Colombia. My pictures were taken in the city's shantytowns, which at that time were home to more than 100,000 poor rural migrants from the countryside.
NEWS
March 19, 2013
Ryan Twentey, an advance placement photography teacher at Parkville High School and a resident of Bel Air, won $10,000 this week as one of two national honorees of the ASCD 2013 Outstanding Young Educator Award. The award was announced Sunday at the association's 68th annual Conference in Chicago. Twentey said he was "humbled to be recognized for what I enjoy most about teaching: empowering my students with skills to succeed," Twentey said. School officials said that during his 12 years at Parkville High, Twentey has worked on systemwide curriculum projects and served as chairman of Parkville's Career and Technology Education program School officials said Twentey is known for working to help students define, and develop, skills they need for their chosen fields.
NEWS
March 19, 2013
Ryan Twentey, an advance placement photography teacher at Parkville High School and a resident of Bel Air, won $10,000 this week as one of two national honorees of the ASCD 2013 Outstanding Young Educator Award. The award was announced Sunday at the association's 68th annual Conference in Chicago. Twentey said he was "humbled to be recognized for what I enjoy most about teaching: empowering my students with skills to succeed," Twentey said. School officials said that during his 12 years at Parkville High, Twentey has worked on systemwide curriculum projects and served as chairman of Parkville's Career and Technology Education program School officials said Twentey is known for working to help students define, and develop, skills they need for their chosen fields.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2013
Paul Edward Kennedy Mullan, a photographer who made headlines as a foundling discovered in a Towson apartment vestibule, died of a brain tumor Feb. 27 at his parents' North Baltimore home. He was 34. The story of his first days filled news columns in January 1979. The Sun reported he was discovered near the vestibule mailboxes of a Towson garden apartment near Towson University. Days old, he was wrapped in a plaid blanket and dressed in a J.C. Penney shirt and a diaper held together with Scotch tape.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.