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Photo Identification

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By Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | February 24, 2012
Two recent bulletins place progressive outrage about voting rights in interesting perspective. Item No. 1: The latest "Pew Center on the States Report" found 24 million invalid voter registrations and nearly 2 million dead people still on U.S. voter rolls. Item No. 2: South Carolina has sued theU.S. Department of Justiceas a result of the DOJ's decision to block the state from requiring voters to show government-issued identification in order to vote. For many of us, this juxtaposition is a head scratcher.
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NEWS
November 8, 2013
The argument that requiring voters to produce identification is racial discrimination is absolutely absurd. My niece recently went to Walmart to exchange an item of clothing that didn't fit properly. She wasn't asking for a refund, just to exchange it for an identical item at the same price in a different size which she found in the store. She was told that without a photo identification they would not exchange it. Should we assume from this that minorities don't patronize Walmart, or at least never have to exchange purchases from there?
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | September 9, 2012
Fact: Photo identification is a necessary element of life in America today. Opinion: Don't believe it? Try cashing an out-of-town check; visiting just about any office building in the country; getting on a commercial airplane; or, buying some types of non-prescription allergy medicines. Of course, Attorney General Eric Holder possesses a more selective view of photo identification. For him, having to produce such proof of identity at the polls is somehow discriminatory against minorities.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2013
Baltimore police will change the way detectives have witnesses identify crime suspects, changing to a method that studies have shown to cut down on erroneous identifications. The current practice is to show witnesses six pictures at the same time, one of whom is the target of an investigation. Under the new method, detectives will show pictures one at a time, and the person conducting the identification will not know which picture is of the suspect. Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts said he was considering the new method when he spoke on a law school panel in March.
NEWS
November 8, 2013
The argument that requiring voters to produce identification is racial discrimination is absolutely absurd. My niece recently went to Walmart to exchange an item of clothing that didn't fit properly. She wasn't asking for a refund, just to exchange it for an identical item at the same price in a different size which she found in the store. She was told that without a photo identification they would not exchange it. Should we assume from this that minorities don't patronize Walmart, or at least never have to exchange purchases from there?
NEWS
November 7, 2012
Early voting is new for me after living outside the country for a decade. Last Friday, I took advantage of it and voted in Westminster. Yet, I am not completely comfortable with this novelty. In particular, two things disturb me. First, I am uncomfortable with the concept in principle. Since 1845, Election Day has been the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November. We still have the same Constitution ratified in 1789 and, although amended, this stability has been one of our greatest assets and unique in the world.
NEWS
November 8, 2012
Regardless of Election Day's results, it's time to call the Electoral College what it truly is - immoral. Obtaining equal voting rights has been a struggle in the United States since our inception. We immorally excluded women and entire ethnicities. We now find it palatable to ignore the minority vote in our winner-takes-all system. A vote for Mitt Romney in Maryland was a vote for zero, nothing, zilch. The same can be said about a vote for Barack Obama in Texas. It's time to resurrect the 91st Congress' attempt to abolish this antiquated and immoral system that systematically ignores large portions of the voting populace.
NEWS
By ELLEN BARRY and ELLEN BARRY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 30, 2005
LA FAYETTE, Ga. -- On a cold, clear winter morning, a red-and-white school bus negotiated the winding road into this city of 6,700, tucked in the hills along the Tennessee border. Kenneth Sherman pulled into a parking lot across from the county courthouse and prepared for another long, slow day. Sherman's bus has been crisscrossing Georgia for four months as part of a state initiative to supply photo identification cards to people who do not have any. The journey has amazed him, he said, with the hints of an old-fashioned life that still exists outside the vortex of Atlanta.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | May 12, 2008
Congratulations to the Indiana legislature, whose harsh voter ID law has ferreted out a suspicious bunch who tried to cast ballots without proper identification in the Democratic primary last week. Who do those old ladies think they are, American citizens? Actually, that's exactly who they are. Several retired nuns who have been voting all their lives were prohibited from casting ballots in South Bend because they didn't have proper ID. The nuns, who live at a convent, went to their polling place on the ground floor.
NEWS
By Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | July 29, 2012
Next time the president asks you to be attorney general of the United States, it might be best to politely refuse the offer. My reasoning: Modern day attorneys general are regularly torched by the Congressional opposition, particularly when that opposition holds a majority in one or both chambers of Congress. Such is the context for the life and times of Attorney General Eric Holder, a movement progressive who dutifully followed the Obama administration's line when Democrats controlled Congress in 2009-10.
NEWS
November 8, 2012
Regardless of Election Day's results, it's time to call the Electoral College what it truly is - immoral. Obtaining equal voting rights has been a struggle in the United States since our inception. We immorally excluded women and entire ethnicities. We now find it palatable to ignore the minority vote in our winner-takes-all system. A vote for Mitt Romney in Maryland was a vote for zero, nothing, zilch. The same can be said about a vote for Barack Obama in Texas. It's time to resurrect the 91st Congress' attempt to abolish this antiquated and immoral system that systematically ignores large portions of the voting populace.
NEWS
November 7, 2012
Early voting is new for me after living outside the country for a decade. Last Friday, I took advantage of it and voted in Westminster. Yet, I am not completely comfortable with this novelty. In particular, two things disturb me. First, I am uncomfortable with the concept in principle. Since 1845, Election Day has been the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November. We still have the same Constitution ratified in 1789 and, although amended, this stability has been one of our greatest assets and unique in the world.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | September 9, 2012
Fact: Photo identification is a necessary element of life in America today. Opinion: Don't believe it? Try cashing an out-of-town check; visiting just about any office building in the country; getting on a commercial airplane; or, buying some types of non-prescription allergy medicines. Of course, Attorney General Eric Holder possesses a more selective view of photo identification. For him, having to produce such proof of identity at the polls is somehow discriminatory against minorities.
NEWS
By Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | July 29, 2012
Next time the president asks you to be attorney general of the United States, it might be best to politely refuse the offer. My reasoning: Modern day attorneys general are regularly torched by the Congressional opposition, particularly when that opposition holds a majority in one or both chambers of Congress. Such is the context for the life and times of Attorney General Eric Holder, a movement progressive who dutifully followed the Obama administration's line when Democrats controlled Congress in 2009-10.
NEWS
By Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | February 24, 2012
Two recent bulletins place progressive outrage about voting rights in interesting perspective. Item No. 1: The latest "Pew Center on the States Report" found 24 million invalid voter registrations and nearly 2 million dead people still on U.S. voter rolls. Item No. 2: South Carolina has sued theU.S. Department of Justiceas a result of the DOJ's decision to block the state from requiring voters to show government-issued identification in order to vote. For many of us, this juxtaposition is a head scratcher.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | May 12, 2008
Congratulations to the Indiana legislature, whose harsh voter ID law has ferreted out a suspicious bunch who tried to cast ballots without proper identification in the Democratic primary last week. Who do those old ladies think they are, American citizens? Actually, that's exactly who they are. Several retired nuns who have been voting all their lives were prohibited from casting ballots in South Bend because they didn't have proper ID. The nuns, who live at a convent, went to their polling place on the ground floor.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2013
Baltimore police will change the way detectives have witnesses identify crime suspects, changing to a method that studies have shown to cut down on erroneous identifications. The current practice is to show witnesses six pictures at the same time, one of whom is the target of an investigation. Under the new method, detectives will show pictures one at a time, and the person conducting the identification will not know which picture is of the suspect. Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts said he was considering the new method when he spoke on a law school panel in March.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2000
Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley and Baltimore County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger announced yesterday a package of state legislative initiatives to cope with shared concerns of crime and neighborhood blight. The package further cements the bonds between two of the area's best-known politicians. Typically, cities and counties press for their own priorities in Annapolis, but the two leaders say they want to launch a new era of cooperation. "We're coming together to make a difference," Ruppersberger said at a news conference at Drumcastle Center on the city-county line along York Road.
NEWS
By ELLEN BARRY and ELLEN BARRY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 30, 2005
LA FAYETTE, Ga. -- On a cold, clear winter morning, a red-and-white school bus negotiated the winding road into this city of 6,700, tucked in the hills along the Tennessee border. Kenneth Sherman pulled into a parking lot across from the county courthouse and prepared for another long, slow day. Sherman's bus has been crisscrossing Georgia for four months as part of a state initiative to supply photo identification cards to people who do not have any. The journey has amazed him, he said, with the hints of an old-fashioned life that still exists outside the vortex of Atlanta.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2000
Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley and Baltimore County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger announced yesterday a package of state legislative initiatives to cope with shared concerns of crime and neighborhood blight. The package further cements the bonds between two of the area's best-known politicians. Typically, cities and counties press for their own priorities in Annapolis, but the two leaders say they want to launch a new era of cooperation. "We're coming together to make a difference," Ruppersberger said at a news conference at Drumcastle Center on the city-county line along York Road.
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