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Phosphorus

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NEWS
November 22, 2013
Alas, the regulation of farming is one of those activities that invites the kind of polarized views that one associates with Washington politics and playground fights. The recent decision by the O'Malley administration to delay new rules limiting the spread of phosphorus-laden poultry manure brought predictable results. Some environmental groups cried "foul" (or "fowl" depending on one's point of view) while the folks at the Maryland Farm Bureau said they wouldn't be satisfied until the regulations were buried much deeper and more permanently than that.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
A soil test recommended adding a lot of phosphorus to my new shrub bed this spring. The soil was very low in phosphorus, and I worked it in well before planting. Should I add more this fall? It's good that you thoroughly worked the phosphorus into the soil, because phosphorus is one of the big polluters of the Chesapeake Bay. It's important to prevent it from being washed into storm drains or waterways that lead to the bay. Phosphorus binds with soil and is not volatile like nitrogen, so the full application you already made should suffice for years to come.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
A soil test recommended adding a lot of phosphorus to my new shrub bed this spring. The soil was very low in phosphorus, and I worked it in well before planting. Should I add more this fall? It's good that you thoroughly worked the phosphorus into the soil, because phosphorus is one of the big polluters of the Chesapeake Bay. It's important to prevent it from being washed into storm drains or waterways that lead to the bay. Phosphorus binds with soil and is not volatile like nitrogen, so the full application you already made should suffice for years to come.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 9, 2014
Legislators from Maryland and Pennsylvania sparred at a hearing in Annapolis Monday over whether their states are doing too much or too little to reduce Chesapeake Bay pollution. In a U.S. Senate subcommittee hearing called to review the new bay restoration agreement, Maryland state Sen. Steve Hershey complained about the "astronomical cost" of cleaning up the ailing estuary, calling it an "unfunded mandate" from the federal government. Maryland's share has been estimated at nearly $15 billion through 2025, he noted.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
Despite early progress reducing Chesapeake Bay pollution, levels of a key pollutant, phosphorus, have not come down in many rivers in the past decade - and are actually rising in several, officials say. Phosphorus is one of two pollutants blamed for causing algae blooms and "dead zones" in the bay, where fish and shellfish can't get enough oxygen in the water. Plants and animals need phosphorus and nitrogen to live, but the bay is choking on an overdose. The lack of progress in reducing phosphorus is a particular problem on the Delmarva Peninsula, officials say, where there's evidence it is washing off the many farm fields fertilized with chicken manure.
NEWS
By Howard Schneider and Howard Schneider,The Washington Post | March 26, 2009
JERUSALEM -Israel's use of white phosphorus artillery shells led to the deaths of at least 12 Palestinian civilians and destroyed millions of dollars in property during the recent three-week war in the Gaza Strip, Human Rights Watch says in a report released Wednesday. Israeli military officials called the claim "baseless" and said the shells, designed to produce a smoke screen, were used in accordance with accepted rules. A frequent critic of Israeli military practices, New York-based Human Rights Watch says its review of the Gaza fighting found instances in which white phosphorus rounds were used in urban areas under circumstances that had no clear military rationale.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1997
Chicken manure just might be one of Mother Nature's best fertilizers.It is also one of the cheapest.As Coulbourne Swift figures it, he can save up to $50 an acre by spreading chicken manure over his farm rather than using chemical fertilizer."
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 17, 2002
Q. A recent test of my garden soil indicated that the phosphorus levels were excessive. Is this a problem and is there anything I can do to lower the levels? A. As part of my job, I review all of the University of Maryland soil tests that originate in Baltimore City. Most of them indicate that the soil phosphorus level is excessive. However, in all but extreme cases this should not cause a problem. The phosphorus is largely bound in the soil, and there is little you can do to lower the levels.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1999
Scientists say they have taken a major step toward improving water quality in the Chesapeake Bay and throughout the country by feeding chickens a hybrid corn that sharply reduces the amount of phosphorus in their waste.Researchers at the University of Delaware fed chickens the corn, along with an enzyme that helps the birds digest phosphorus more efficiently, and found the birds produced manure with 41 percent less phosphorus and 82 percent less water-soluble phosphorus. The mineral has been related to water pollution and outbreaks of Pfiesteria piscicida.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Key senators have put language in the state budget bill that would stall Maryland's efforts to limit one of the Chesapeake Bay's main pollutants, phosphorus. The amendment by the Budget & Taxation Committee would prohibit the state from issuing new regulations on phosphorus, pending the results of an economic impact study. And when that is done, the committee would have 45 days for review and to recommend further action. Sen. James N. Mathias Jr., an Eastern Shore Democrat who sought the budget restriction, says he wants to shield the state's farmers and the poultry industry from potentially very costly and disruptive regulations.
NEWS
July 28, 2014
If all went as planned, Gov. Martin O'Malley spent this past weekend in Iowa, his second trip to the state in a month, which puts him about two visits ahead of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton this year. His purpose is hardly a secret as he's considered a likely Democratic candidate, albeit a relatively unknown one, for a 2016 presidential run. Conventional wisdom is that candidates in Iowa say nice things about agriculture. One of the big controversies involving this year's race for a U.S. Senate seat from the Hawkeye state, for instance, was whether the Democratic candidate, Rep. Bruce Braley, threatened a lawsuit when some of his neighbor's organically-raised chickens wandered into his yard.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | July 14, 2014
Federal environmental officials may be overestimating farm pollution reductions in the Chesapeake Bay, contends a Washington environmental group, which also finds that phosphorus and algae concentrations in rivers on Maryland's Eastern Shore have shown no real improvement over the last decade Those are the conclusions of a pair of reports released Monday by the Environmental Integrity Project. State monitoring data showed no reduction in phosphorus levels in eight waterways on the Shore from 2003 to 2013, while concentrations actually worsened in three rivers: the Nanticoke, the Sassafras, and the Transquaking.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Government officials involved in the multistate Chesapeake Bay cleanup pledged Monday to broaden and accelerate the long-running effort, including a vow to address the impacts of climate change on the ailing estuary. Governors of Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Delaware signed a new bay restoration agreement in Annapolis, which for the first time formally encompasses "upstream" states with smaller slices of the 64,000-square-mile watershed, including New York and West Virginia.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
Despite early progress reducing Chesapeake Bay pollution, levels of a key pollutant, phosphorus, have not come down in many rivers in the past decade - and are actually rising in several, officials say. Phosphorus is one of two pollutants blamed for causing algae blooms and "dead zones" in the bay, where fish and shellfish can't get enough oxygen in the water. Plants and animals need phosphorus and nitrogen to live, but the bay is choking on an overdose. The lack of progress in reducing phosphorus is a particular problem on the Delmarva Peninsula, officials say, where there's evidence it is washing off the many farm fields fertilized with chicken manure.
NEWS
By Bill Satterfield | March 14, 2014
In a commentary published March 6 in The Baltimore Sun, Why is O'Malley giving poultry polluters a free ride?, the authors, both of the Food & Water Watch organization, claim that the chicken companies operating on Maryland's Eastern Shore are the "bay's biggest polluters" and that they are getting a free ride on the backs of the taxpayers. Also, they claim that chicken manure, a heavily regulated and locally produced organic fertilizer, is the cause of "massive pollution" of the Chesapeake Bay. The facts speak otherwise.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Key senators have put language in the state budget bill that would stall Maryland's efforts to limit one of the Chesapeake Bay's main pollutants, phosphorus. The amendment by the Budget & Taxation Committee would prohibit the state from issuing new regulations on phosphorus, pending the results of an economic impact study. And when that is done, the committee would have 45 days for review and to recommend further action. Sen. James N. Mathias Jr., an Eastern Shore Democrat who sought the budget restriction, says he wants to shield the state's farmers and the poultry industry from potentially very costly and disruptive regulations.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1999
The state Department of Agriculture announced a pilot project yesterday that will allow Maryland farmers to manage the phosphorus-based nutrients in their crop soil.The four-year project will receive $1.5 million in annual funding from the state and the five poultry companies on the Eastern Shore, and permit farmers with excess poultry litter to transport it to farmers needing more.Poultry litter is chicken manure mixed with wood shavings. It contains more phosphorus than other fertilizers, and overloading cropland with phosphorus could cause long-term land or water-quality problems, said Norm Astle, the project coordinator.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | July 14, 2014
Federal environmental officials may be overestimating farm pollution reductions in the Chesapeake Bay, contends a Washington environmental group, which also finds that phosphorus and algae concentrations in rivers on Maryland's Eastern Shore have shown no real improvement over the last decade Those are the conclusions of a pair of reports released Monday by the Environmental Integrity Project. State monitoring data showed no reduction in phosphorus levels in eight waterways on the Shore from 2003 to 2013, while concentrations actually worsened in three rivers: the Nanticoke, the Sassafras, and the Transquaking.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
Alas, the regulation of farming is one of those activities that invites the kind of polarized views that one associates with Washington politics and playground fights. The recent decision by the O'Malley administration to delay new rules limiting the spread of phosphorus-laden poultry manure brought predictable results. Some environmental groups cried "foul" (or "fowl" depending on one's point of view) while the folks at the Maryland Farm Bureau said they wouldn't be satisfied until the regulations were buried much deeper and more permanently than that.
NEWS
November 20, 2013
Phosphorus is a huge problem in the Chesapeake Bay, and its source is known ( "Farm pollution rule withdrawn," Nov. 15). It is an outrage that Perdue, for whom the farmers are essentially sub-contractors, can veto the effort to employ best available technology to reduce phosphorus runoff into the bay's waters. Dan Watson - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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