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By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | June 14, 1992
Q: I have an old Edison phonograph that belonged to my grandfather. Where can I find parts, needles and cylinder records? Who can restore it?A: Phonographs and parts, records, musical instruments, sheet music, music boxes, jukeboxes, music-related advertisements, store displays and more are available at the Antique Village Museum and Wild West Town, U.S. Highway 20 and South Union Road in Union, Ill. Write to the museum's antique phonograph repairer, Larry...
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2000
William R. MacDonald, a retired engineer who once worked for Thomas Alva Edison, died May 19 of undetermined causes at his home in Lancaster, Pa. He was 104. The former longtime Hamilton resident, known as "Mac," had lived in Lancaster since 1991. He retired from Drummond Paving Co. in Baltimore in 1965. After earning his bachelor's degree in civil and mechanical engineering from the College of the City of New York in 1920, he worked as a Wall Street brokerage house runner. In 1920, he responded to a New York newspaper ad for a job at Edison Laboratories in West Orange, N.J. After arriving there, he took an essay test in American history, chemistry, geography and ancient history and was sent to another building for grading.
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NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT | August 8, 1992
After Thomas Edison perfected the phonograph, a little light bulb went off in the inventor's head. Hoping to promote his product, Edison invited a famous diva to record an aria on his machine. Then he persuaded the lady to declare the result ''indistinguishable from my own voice.''Of course it wasn't. Most early recordings sound so unrelievedly tinny and artificial that it is difficult today to comprehend how anyone could have confused them with the real thing. Serious musicians detested them.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1997
WEST ORANGE, N.J. -- If Thomas Edison could have foreseen the future, he might have invented a way to preserve his legacy.As it is, historians and archivists are trying to protect the works of America's greatest inventor from time and the elements.The Edison National Historic Site in West Orange holds the largest collection of the inventor's materials: 5.4 million artifacts, from the first phonograph to the patent for the incandescent light bulb. Edison consolidated his operations here in 1887 after he outgrew his laboratory in Menlo Park, N.J., and tired of commuting to his New York City headquarters.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | November 22, 1992
Today's scary topic for parents is: what your children do when you're not home.fTC I have here a letter from Buffalo, N.Y., working mom Judy Price, concerning her 14-year-old son, David, "who should certainly know better."Judy states that one day when she came home from work, David met her outside and said: "Hi, Mom. Are you going in?"Judy says she considered replying, "No, I thought I'd just stay in the car all night and pull away for work in the morning."That actually would have been a wise idea.
NEWS
By MICHELLE HOFFMAN | July 15, 1993
In 1941, Walter Myers came across a great bargain at a public sale. For only 50 cents, he purchased a dismantled phonograph, an Edison cylinder machine."
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1997
WEST ORANGE, N.J. -- If Thomas Edison could have foreseen the future, he might have invented a way to preserve his legacy.As it is, historians and archivists are trying to protect the works of America's greatest inventor from time and the elements.The Edison National Historic Site in West Orange holds the largest collection of the inventor's materials: 5.4 million artifacts, from the first phonograph to the patent for the incandescent light bulb. Edison consolidated his operations here in 1887 after he outgrew his laboratory in Menlo Park, N.J., and tired of commuting to his New York City headquarters.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2000
William R. MacDonald, a retired engineer who once worked for Thomas Alva Edison, died May 19 of undetermined causes at his home in Lancaster, Pa. He was 104. The former longtime Hamilton resident, known as "Mac," had lived in Lancaster since 1991. He retired from Drummond Paving Co. in Baltimore in 1965. After earning his bachelor's degree in civil and mechanical engineering from the College of the City of New York in 1920, he worked as a Wall Street brokerage house runner. In 1920, he responded to a New York newspaper ad for a job at Edison Laboratories in West Orange, N.J. After arriving there, he took an essay test in American history, chemistry, geography and ancient history and was sent to another building for grading.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | August 25, 1991
Q: Is there a price guide for picture discs as well as one for Royal Doulton figurines?A: A picture disc is a phonograph record that has a picture or a graphic paper (or cardboard) sheet underneath the grooves of clear vinyl, plastic or shellac. The "Picture Discs of the World Price Guide and International Reference Book for Picture Records: 1923-1989," by Joe Lindsay with Peter Bukoski and Marc Grobman, is available for $25.95 postpaid from BIOdisc, Box 8221, Scottsdale, Ariz. 85251; phone (602)
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | September 28, 1997
THIS FALL'S HOME project is finding a new cabinet to hold all the phonograph records I've been hoarding for the past 40 years. I refuse to surrender the battered 78s my mother bought for me.Early on, it was established that I had no voice, not even a squeak. I got a zero in manual dexterity, too, so forget about playing the piano. But don't allow me near a record store.The wicker baby carriage my mother pushed as her combined station wagon and back-alley tank occasionally found its way home with a 10-inch disc selected from the inventory of a Waverly music house.
NEWS
By MICHELLE HOFFMAN | July 15, 1993
In 1941, Walter Myers came across a great bargain at a public sale. For only 50 cents, he purchased a dismantled phonograph, an Edison cylinder machine."
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | November 22, 1992
Today's scary topic for parents is: what your children do when you're not home.fTC I have here a letter from Buffalo, N.Y., working mom Judy Price, concerning her 14-year-old son, David, "who should certainly know better."Judy states that one day when she came home from work, David met her outside and said: "Hi, Mom. Are you going in?"Judy says she considered replying, "No, I thought I'd just stay in the car all night and pull away for work in the morning."That actually would have been a wise idea.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT | August 8, 1992
After Thomas Edison perfected the phonograph, a little light bulb went off in the inventor's head. Hoping to promote his product, Edison invited a famous diva to record an aria on his machine. Then he persuaded the lady to declare the result ''indistinguishable from my own voice.''Of course it wasn't. Most early recordings sound so unrelievedly tinny and artificial that it is difficult today to comprehend how anyone could have confused them with the real thing. Serious musicians detested them.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | June 14, 1992
Q: I have an old Edison phonograph that belonged to my grandfather. Where can I find parts, needles and cylinder records? Who can restore it?A: Phonographs and parts, records, musical instruments, sheet music, music boxes, jukeboxes, music-related advertisements, store displays and more are available at the Antique Village Museum and Wild West Town, U.S. Highway 20 and South Union Road in Union, Ill. Write to the museum's antique phonograph repairer, Larry...
NEWS
By Tara Finnegan and Tara Finnegan,Contributing Writer | August 27, 1993
Somehow, back in 1947, the mascot Colts outran Foxes, Crabs, Bivalves and White Elephants to become the name of Baltimore's new professional football franchise.Out of 1,887 entries and 660 different names, Colts had a certain ring to it that Free Staters, Calverts, Rebels, Blades and Blackjacks simply didn't have.Colts was announced as the franchise's name on Friday, Feb. 7, 1947. A committee formed of local sportscasters, reporters and businessmen held a contest that enabled the fans to select the team's name.
NEWS
August 8, 2002
Myra D. Jans, a homemaker, traveler and amateur pianist, died of respiratory illness Saturday at her home in North Baltimore's Tuscany-Canterbury neighborhood. She was 82. Born Myra Dunn in Mount Airy and raised in Forest Park, she was a 1937 graduate of Forest Park High School. She attended the Peabody Conservatory. She was manager of the phonograph record department at the May Co. on Howard Street in the 1940s. She later sold classified advertising for the Yellow Pages. In the early 1950s, she worked in public relations for the Television Co. of Maryland.
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