Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPhonics
IN THE NEWS

Phonics

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
September 27, 1998
Susan Rapp of the Village Reading Center responds to a question she often hears.For the past six years I've taught reading to second-graders using a whole language approach. Now our school is emphasizing more phonics along with whole language in the primary grades. Isn't teaching phonics primarily teaching rules that the students must memorize?In learning phonics, students learn both the connections between letters and sounds and the generalizations behind these connections. For example: For the short vowels, an important generalization is that when a word has one vowel followed by one consonant, the sound will be short, as in am, cat, him, sun. It is the sound you hear in the first part of ap-ple.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By JEFF BARKER | January 26, 2009
* Greg Paulus, the Duke guard who comes off the bench, had as many rebounds (five) Saturday as any Terp? * The Cameron Crazies' chants included "Hooked on phonics" and "Sweat, Gary, sweat"? ( For more, go to baltimoresun.com/terpsblog)
Advertisement
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | July 7, 1996
No SKILL IS MORE basic to education than the ability to read. So a reasonable person would expect to find consensus among educators on the best methods for turning young children into competent readers.Not so. Even a tiny sample of the stormy controversies that swirl around this topic quickly dispels that naive notion.The teaching of reading is big business, from textbook publishers to educators who build their careers researching various methods or advocating one approach over another. Their decisions have a huge impact on the success of our schools.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | September 26, 2007
Hooked on Phonics found success in late-night infomercials in the 1990s, selling up to $100 million a year of packaged materials that were used to help teach children how to read. Then the once-successful marketing formula was scrapped when Baltimore's Educate Inc. bought the struggling brand in 2005 and turned it into a retail product sold at the likes of Target, Wal-Mart and Costco. Now, Hooked on Phonics is returning to its TV roots by promoting its products on airwaves around the world.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | December 17, 1995
"THE FOUNDATION of a child's education -- the ability to read -- has been compromised in Baltimore County public schools.''With that uncompromising statement, Catherine C. Froggatt opened one of the livelier and lengthier exchanges of letters-to-the-editor these pages have seen. Ms. Froggatt's letter, which appeared November 19, 1994, presented a persuasive case that the abandonment of a systematic approach to the teaching of phonics in county schools was causing much damage and helped explain falling reading scores in the lower grades.
FEATURES
By Susan Rapp | February 22, 1998
The Sun has assembled a panel of professionals to address your concerns about how your child is learning to read. Your questions and their responses will appear regularly on these pages. We also will ask other parents what has worked for them. If you have a question, or a suggestion, please write to: Ask the Experts, Reading by 9, Features Department, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 21278Question: I have two young children (21 months and 3 years) and am interested in teaching them to read using phonics.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writer | July 30, 1995
In a back-to-basics shift, some Howard County public schools for the first time in years will return this fall to a stress on teaching students to read via direct drills in phonics.More than a quarter of the county's elementary schools plan this school year to offer to some of their beginning readers more intensive instruction in phonics, a traditional method thatteaches children to decode words by sounding out letters and certain letter combinations.The move is in line with a national trend as school districts across the country are tempering their reliance on the more recently developed "whole-language" approach to reading instruction, which stresses reading for content and deciphering the meaning of unfamiliar words from their context.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1997
Catholic schools are hooked on phonics.Over the decades -- as fads in reading instruction have come and gone -- Baltimore-area Catholic schools, like many other parochial schools across the nation, have held to teaching children to read by first focusing on the sounds that make up words and sound-letter relationships.In stark contrast to most public schools, which in the 1980s tended to forsake teaching sounds for an early focus on reading stories, virtually all of the 70 elementary schools in the Archdiocese of Baltimore teach phonics as a separate subject in the early grades.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1998
Critics of Maryland's public school systems urged legislators yesterday to "get back to basics" and pass a bill making phonics the state's primary method of reading instruction.In sometimes emotional testimony before the House Ways and Means Committee, phonics advocates argued that public schools have done irreparable harm to children by clinging to failed methods of reading instruction."When you can't read, you feel ashamed. You think you're stupid," said Conrae Fortlage, who said she has been afflicted by spelling and reading problems as a result of a nonphonics "whole language" curriculum.
NEWS
February 9, 1998
LEARNING TO read is one of life's defining experiences. For many children, the skill comes as naturally as learning to ride a bicycle. For others, the process is fraught with frustration and failure. No responsible adult can turn a deaf ear to con- cerns about how reading is taught, especiallyconcerns that some teaching methods increase the chances that children will fail to become competent readers in the early elementary years.But the proper place for these discussions is at meetings of boards of education, in school administrative offices, in classrooms with principals or teachers, and especially in the colleges and universities where future teachers are being trained.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO and HANAH CHO,SUN REPORTER | June 25, 2006
On Wal-Mart's aisle of educational toys and children's learning materials, dozens of brightly packaged products and cartoon-infused titles vie for parents' attention and a slice of their pocketbooks. There's the LeapFrog electronic writing pad, Dora the Explorer learning kits, SpongeBob SquarePants education games - and an old brand fighting to be new again. More than a decade past the peak of the backlash against "whole language" reading instruction that propelled Hooked on Phonics into infomercial ubiquity, Baltimore-based Educate Inc. is aggressively reintroducing the brand as an educational products line at mass retailers and discount clubs.
BUSINESS
By Rhasheema A. Sweeting and Rhasheema A. Sweeting,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2005
Hooked on Phonics, famous for its late-night TV infomercials, hopes to capture sales with a more traditional format under a new Baltimore-based owner: Its products will soon be available at major retailers nationwide. The brand, acquired by Educate Inc. from Gateway Learning Corp. for $13 million in January, aims to reach more customers at retail outlets such as Wal-Mart, Target and Amazon.com. "We're moving to retail distribution to give parents and educators easier access to our award-winning products," said Chip Paucek, general manager for Hooked on Phonics.
BUSINESS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
In the 1990s, Hooked on Phonics rode a backlash against so-called whole language reading instruction in schools to become an infomercial phenomenon. But education experts and, at times, federal regulators have been skeptical of the company's claims that it could rapidly improve the skills of struggling young readers. Education experts caution that it works only as an after-school adjunct to comprehensive reading instruction that teaches children more than sounding out letters and words.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
The company that owns the frequently advertised Sylvan tutoring centers is buying another as-seen-on-TV name: Hooked on Phonics. Educate Inc., Sylvan Learning Center's parent, said yesterday that it has agreed to pay $13 million for Gateway Learning Corp., which owns the well-known - and sometimes controversial - company whose "Hooked on Phonics worked for me!" slogan became a staple of the airwaves. It might seem an odd marriage, pairing a tutoring giant with a product company. But Baltimore-based Educate is buying Hooked on Phonics primarily for the brand, and for a new and relatively small part of the company that has nothing to do with infomercials.
NEWS
September 22, 2003
REMEDIAL READING lessons for teachers: That's what the federal government now is spending millions to provide, because so few teachers of young children have a thorough grounding in the science of language development. Maryland just received a $65 million federal grant that highlights this disconnect: The state's new primary-grades curriculum focuses on phonics, the teaching of the relationship between letters and sounds, and its new annual tests measure pupils' mastery of phonics -- these efforts are required now by the federal No Child Left Behind Act. But education officials lament that teachers steeped in the latest instructional methods and brain research on how language is learned are in short supply.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2003
Maryland school officials yesterday received the first installment of a $66 million federal grant aimed at improving reading instruction with an infusion of phonics. Eugene Hickok, U.S. undersecretary of education, delivered a $20 million check, much of which will go to training teachers in "scientifically proven" strategies. The six-year program, known as Reading First, "will change the way reading is taught in Maryland," said state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick. It was Maryland's second effort to win the grant.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1998
Republicans in the state House of Delegates are rallying around a bill sponsored by Del. Nancy Jacobs that would designate phonics as the primary method for teaching reading in Maryland's public schools.The legislation, which the Harford County Republican intends to introduce today, sets up a potential confrontation with state education leaders and perhaps with Gov. Parris N. Glendening. GOP front-runner Ellen R. Sauerbrey has identified phonics as a "hot-button" issue in this year's gubernatorial election.
BUSINESS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
In the 1990s, Hooked on Phonics rode a backlash against so-called whole language reading instruction in schools to become an infomercial phenomenon. But education experts and, at times, federal regulators have been skeptical of the company's claims that it could rapidly improve the skills of struggling young readers. Education experts caution that it works only as an after-school adjunct to comprehensive reading instruction that teaches children more than sounding out letters and words.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 12, 2003
NEW YORK - "Reading Is Fundamental," says the bumper sticker. "If you can read this, thank a teacher," says another. Whom do you thank, or blame, if you can't read or read well? New Yorkers can thank (or blame) the new "phonics" program embraced by Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and School Chancellor Joel L. Klein. It is not a true phonics program, but a witch's brew of small amounts of phonics and heaping doses of the failed "whole language" approach that is increasingly being abandoned in school districts across the country.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2003
Anne Arundel County teachers and principals are bracing for Superintendent Eric J. Smith's plan to spend more than $8 million on a phonics-heavy reading curriculum for elementary schools next year. Buying the Open Court reading series would be Smith's most costly initiative since taking over as superintendent. If approved by the school board and County Council, it would come during a year of fiscal belt-tightening by school officials, who have proposed nearly $13 million in cuts, including building maintenance and teacher support programs.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.