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BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1998
To help it fund a satellite-linked wireless phone network for a former Soviet republic, Omni Communications Inc. said yesterday that it has formed a joint venture with Metromedia International Group, a public, New Jersey-based media and communications company.The Baltimore telecommunications company said the new company, Omni Metromedia Caspian Ltd., based in the Bahamas, had acquired Omni's interest in Caspian American Telecommunications LLC, a company started by Omni in 1997 to operate its exclusive 20-year license to build a wireless network from the Republic of Azerbaijan.
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NEWS
September 29, 2012
The purchase of Voice over Internet Protocol telephones and related equipment by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration may not have been illegal. That's the kindest conclusion one can draw from a report on the matter by the city's inspector general, David N. McClintock, which otherwise notes that the process was inefficient and rife with possible conflicts of interest and deception. But it is to that slender reed of vindication that Ms. Rawlings-Blake is clinging as she continues to avoid taking real responsibility for the mess and fails to provide a path forward to responsibly handle a needed upgrade of the city's communications technology.
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BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | August 13, 1992
Bell Atlantic Corp. has agreed to let Metropolitan Fiber Systems Inc., a prime competitor for business customers, expand its reach by using Bell Atlantic's network, a move destined to further loosen Bell Atlantic's grip on the local phone market.Under terms of the agreement, announced yesterday, Bell Atlantic will let Metropolitan Fiber place its equipment at a number of Bell Atlantic's telephone switching sites. Metropolitan Fiber will pay an undisclosed amount for that access.That means Metropolitan Fiber will be able to expand its jTC network, which generally had been limited to urban areas, and to reach virtually any business customer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jon Van and Jon Van,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 25, 2004
After passing out and winding up in an emergency room last year, William Robie agreed to wear a heart-monitoring device about the size of a pager. Each time it alerted him, the 84-year-old Lake Forest, Ill., resident dialed a phone number so the device could transmit data to technicians stationed at LifeWatch Inc. "I seemed to have more incidents at night, so it'd wake me up," Robie said. "I'd transmit the data, reset it and go back to sleep." After monitoring Robie for a month, his cardiologist prescribed a pacemaker.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1998
Derya O. Yavalar is about to take another big risk.In 1970, he immigrated to America from Turkey with $25 in his pocket. He was 16. On his flight across the Atlantic, he knew just enough English to ask the stewardesses for Coca-Cola after Coca-Cola -- but not enough to ask his seatmates to excuse him to go to the bathroom.He survived the trip and went on to see his American Dream pay off. He became a U.S. citizen and a successful businessman, working for prominent communications firms such as GTE Corp.
NEWS
By Staff Report | January 12, 1994
Vivian Nusbaum of Union Bridge was elected chairwoman of the Carroll County Commission on Aging yesterday during the panel's monthly meeting at the Westminster Senior Citizens Center.Mrs. Nusbaum, last year's vice chairwoman, will assume the post held during the past year by Richard Warehime of New Windsor.Kenneth Mays of Taneytown was elected vice chairman.The Commission on Aging serves as a volunteer advisory board for the Carroll County Bureau of Aging.Commission member Peg Sheeler briefed members yesterday on a new telephone network through which the Bureau of Aging will be able to notify seniors of urgent matters that may arise during the 1994 General Assembly session.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | March 11, 1992
It's called "lifestyle telephony," and it reads like this: Find technologies that can make the phone network do whatever you want, whenever you want.Need help with overflow faxes? Let the phone network handle it. Need to remotely adjust your home heating? No problem. Call your home phone and program it in. Want your children to spend more time on homework and less time gabbing? Get the network to remind teen-age callers that evening hours are homework hours."We call this lifestyle telephony," said Mark Emery, director of new products for Bell Atlantic Corp.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | March 11, 1992
It's called "lifestyle telephony," and it reads like this: Find technologies that can make the phone network do whatever you want, whenever you want. Need help with overflow faxes? Let the phone network handle it. Need to remotely adjust your home heating? No problem. Call your home phone and program it in. Want your children to spend more time on homework and less time gabbing? Get the network to remind teen-age callers that evening hours are homework hours. "We call this lifestyle telephony," said Mark Emery, director of new products for Bell Atlantic Corp.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | February 9, 1997
THE AMERICAN phone network is one of the greatest engineering feats in the history of mankind. Pick up the receiver, punch in a few numbers and a few seconds later, you're chatting with someone across town or halfway around the world.While the system that hurls your voice across continents and oceans is state-of-the-art, the technology that connects it to your home hasn't changed that much in 50 years. It works fine with people on the line, but it wasn't designed for the millions of humans who suddenly want their computers to do the talking.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 28, 1997
AT&T Corp. broke off its merger talks with SBC Communications yesterday after a hailstorm of criticism from regulators and mounting internal disagreement about how to structure a deal, according to several executives involved in the talks."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 9, 2004
Corvis Communications Corp., which sells network equipment and telecommunications services, agreed yesterday to buy closely held Focal Communications Corp. for $101 million in stock and $109 million in assumed debt. With the deal, Corvis is adding a local-telephone network with 4,000 customers, the Columbia company said in a statement. Its shares rose 6 percent. Chief Executive Officer David Huber is transforming Corvis into a phone carrier after sales of fiber-optic gear slumped. Last year, he bought the long-haul network of the former Broadwing Inc. The purchase of Focal, which emerged from bankruptcy last year, will help Corvis pare network-access costs by giving it a local service that sells to businesses and to other phone providers.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 3, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration has repeatedly promoted its efforts to develop Iraq's private-sector economy as an engine of job creation and hope for the country's beleaguered population and a model for an economically backward region. But if Iraq's experience with one of its earliest and most important private business ventures - a mobile telephone network - is any indication, progress in grafting a free-enterprise system onto what had been a state-controlled economy will be slow and rocky.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2000
The city could reap millions in revenue from telecommunications companies that want to install computer cable beneath city streets, under legislation introduced last night in the City Council. Hoping to cut into a $140 million budget shortfall projected over the next three years, Mayor Martin O'Malley requested the legislation, which removes a cap on the fee charged for access to city-owned conduits. The annual lease fee -- now 22 cents a linear foot -- was first initiated in an agreement over a century ago, when telephone companies first began establishing an underground network in the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | May 31, 1999
Five years ago, parents and kids battled over who got to use the family computer and when. Today, the kids are likely to have their own PC, but the battles are still going on -- this time it's over who gets to use the Internet and the fancy color printer.Enter home networking, one of the hottest technologies to emerge this year. Networks allow users to share their disk drives, printers and Internet connections, but until now, they've required wiring that most homes don't have, as well as a certified geek to keep them running.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1998
To help it fund a satellite-linked wireless phone network for a former Soviet republic, Omni Communications Inc. said yesterday that it has formed a joint venture with Metromedia International Group, a public, New Jersey-based media and communications company.The Baltimore telecommunications company said the new company, Omni Metromedia Caspian Ltd., based in the Bahamas, had acquired Omni's interest in Caspian American Telecommunications LLC, a company started by Omni in 1997 to operate its exclusive 20-year license to build a wireless network from the Republic of Azerbaijan.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1998
Derya O. Yavalar is about to take another big risk.In 1970, he immigrated to America from Turkey with $25 in his pocket. He was 16. On his flight across the Atlantic, he knew just enough English to ask the stewardesses for Coca-Cola after Coca-Cola -- but not enough to ask his seatmates to excuse him to go to the bathroom.He survived the trip and went on to see his American Dream pay off. He became a U.S. citizen and a successful businessman, working for prominent communications firms such as GTE Corp.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley | February 7, 1991
MCI Communications Corp. unveiled a new marketing program yesterday for federal agencies aimed at luring customers from the government's new FTS 2000 phone network -- and thus away from rivals American Telephone & Telegraph Co. and US Sprint.MCI said its new Government Telecommunications Services program will sell voice and data services to federal customers at prices that are up to 40 percent below those offered through existing federal contracts, including FTS 2000. The FTS 2000 network is a program of AT&T and Sprint.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley jHC PlB | May 9, 1991
The General Services Administration, under pressure from the House Government Operations Committee, agreed yesterday to suspend the assignment of the Navy to US Sprint's FTS 2000 government phone network pending further review.At the same time, GSA agreed to appoint an assistant administrator for FTS 2000 who will have responsibility for managing the FTS 2000 program. The new assistant administrator, who has not been named, will have authority to decide the fate of the Navy assignment to Sprint's network.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 28, 1997
AT&T Corp. broke off its merger talks with SBC Communications yesterday after a hailstorm of criticism from regulators and mounting internal disagreement about how to structure a deal, according to several executives involved in the talks."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- MCI Communications Corp.'s first-quarter profit was unchanged from a year earlier, the company said yesterday, as wider losses in new local phone and international operations offset an increase in long-distance earnings.The nation's No. 2 long-distance company behind AT&T Corp. said it earned $295 million, or 42 cents a share, the same as a year earlier. The earnings were a penny short of the average estimate of 43 cents a share, based on a survey of 15 analysts by IBES International Inc. MCI shares fell $1.375, to end at $37.375, in Nasdaq trading yesterday.
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