Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPhone Cards
IN THE NEWS

Phone Cards

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn and Jane Bryant Quinn,Washington Post Writers Group | August 24, 1998
PREPAID PHONE cards are hot and getting hotter. Their prices are falling, according to Frost & Sullivan, a consulting firm in Mountain View, Calif. For many consumers, they're the lowest-cost way of making long-distance telephone calls.There are two kinds of phone cards, traditional and prepaid. Traditional cards (often called "calling cards") are issued by your long-distance telephone company. You're billed every month for the calls you've made.Prepaid cards are sold by some 500 national and local firms, reports the Chicago trade paper, Debit Card News.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2010
While many teenagers were eagerly anticipating what gifts they will receive this holiday season, students at Mount Hebron High School in Ellicott City were making sure that soldiers at Walter Reed Army Medical Center don't go empty-handed. Mount Hebron High staged its fourth annual Operation Remembering Our Troops for soldiers recuperating at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Bethesda. During the drive, which was launched by office secretary Maura Dribben, the school collected such items as gift cards of $5 or $10 that soldiers can use at department stores and grocery stores, as well as phone cards.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | December 23, 2007
You might not get exactly what you're paying for when it comes to using prepaid calling cards to reach out to family and friends, according to a new study by the Washington-based Hispanic Institute. It tested 45 international prepaid calling cards for efficacy and value, and found that the average card delivered only 60 percent of the minutes promised. A third of the 45 cards delivered the full call-time promised; seven, or 15.6 percent, didn't work at all; and eight had call completion rates of 50 percent or less.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | February 3, 2008
For soldiers stationed overseas, phone calls are a crucial link to loved ones and the lives they left behind to serve their country. So when Colin Sawyer's mom in Mount Wolf, Pa., sent him an AT&T prepaid phone card, the 24-year-old Army gunner in Iraq was excited to have the precious 550 minutes to call home. "I went to use it one night after patrol and an automated voice came on and said, `You have 55 minutes left for this call,'" said Sawyer, who was on leave recently to visit family.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | October 16, 1994
Audiotapes have been a museum staple for years. Look at the picture, push the button and hear all about it.Talking Frames Corp. is bringing the concept to collectors' living rooms.Remarkable Moments are 16-by-19 lithographs of memorable events.Each includes a text, and when the viewer reaches the Talking Frames logo, it's time to push the button and get a 20-second sound bite. Sometimes the principal is talking (Lou Gehrig's farewell), and sometimes it's an announcer (Russ Hodges calling Bobby Thomson's 1951 playoff home run)
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1996
It's back, a year early, bigger and smaller than before.Sports Collectors Digest has added 68 pages to its "1996 Standard Catalog of Baseball Cards," but lighter paper makes its 1,214 pages less hefty than the 1995 edition.The catalog is usually published every two years, but Krause Publications says it brought out its fifth edition a year early to reflect current market trends and to add more than 200 previously unlisted sets. The newly listed sets include regional issues.Phone cards are listed for the first time.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | June 19, 1994
Remember Pro Set, the champion overproducer of sports cards?It filed for bankruptcy Aug. 20, 1992, and had been operating under Chapter 11 protection. Two weeks ago, its creditors approved a plan that will allow Pro Set to emerge from Chapter 11.That clears the way for Pro Set to be sold to Power Entertainment, a new company formed by Chadwick, Chambers & Associates of Houston, later this month."The challenge is to re-establish credibility with collectors," said Pro Set's vice president of sales Ken Parlini, who was in Baltimore last weekend for Diamond Comic Distributors' annual retail seminar.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1996
The baseball card that made headlines five years ago when it was sold at auction for $451,000 is on the block again.That's the 1910 Honus Wagner T-206 card that hockey star Wayne Gretzky and former Los Angeles Kings owner Bruce McNall bought for the record price at a Sotheby's auction. In 1994, Gretzky bought out McNall's half and subsequently sold the card to Treat Entertainment, a distributor of cards, collectibles and accessories.Treat made the card the centerpiece of a classic card give-away, and Patricia Gibbs, a postal clerk from Hollywood, Fla., won the card in a February drawing.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Columnist | December 12, 2006
This is the time of year when soup kitchens are overflowing with both soup and volunteers. When pantries for the hungry are fully stocked. It is the time of year when shoppers stuff lots of money into bright red kettles. When toys and books overflow the boxes set up to brighten a poor child's Christmas. The same is true for our newest devotion: the lonely soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan and the wounded in our military hospitals. Charities that support our troops are hip deep in DVDs and phone cards and care packages this month.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1995
The Orioles moved quickly this winter to sign Roberto Alomar -- and the star second baseman didn't come cheaply.It's a different story for Baltimore-area collectors. They are not stampeding to hobby stores to buy Alomar cards, which are relatively inexpensive.Alomar's first card is a 1988 Donruss "Rated Rookie." According to Mike Tanner at Baseball Card Outlet in Eastwood, it never has been pricey because "they printed a ton." The January 1996 issue of Beckett Baseball lists it at $2.Alomar appears in 1988 Fleer ($5 in Beckett)
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | December 23, 2007
You might not get exactly what you're paying for when it comes to using prepaid calling cards to reach out to family and friends, according to a new study by the Washington-based Hispanic Institute. It tested 45 international prepaid calling cards for efficacy and value, and found that the average card delivered only 60 percent of the minutes promised. A third of the 45 cards delivered the full call-time promised; seven, or 15.6 percent, didn't work at all; and eight had call completion rates of 50 percent or less.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Columnist | December 12, 2006
This is the time of year when soup kitchens are overflowing with both soup and volunteers. When pantries for the hungry are fully stocked. It is the time of year when shoppers stuff lots of money into bright red kettles. When toys and books overflow the boxes set up to brighten a poor child's Christmas. The same is true for our newest devotion: the lonely soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan and the wounded in our military hospitals. Charities that support our troops are hip deep in DVDs and phone cards and care packages this month.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2003
The illicit use of a telephone credit card led city police to a 31-year-old man charged last week in four Guilford-area robberies during the past two months, detectives said yesterday. Roy Henderson Harrison III, who police believe is responsible for several other North Baltimore robberies during the past few months, was being held yesterday without bail at the city jail, authorities said. Detectives Thomas Wolf and Myrna Sexton of the Northern District said they began focusing on Harrison soon after a 51-year-old man was robbed at gunpoint Dec. 14 in the 500 block of E. 34th St. The robber took the man's wallet, which contained a phone card, and punched the victim twice in the face before fleeing, police said.
NEWS
By Gabriel Baird and Gabriel Baird,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2002
Chris Raveling was waiting to be deployed overseas to support Operation Enduring Freedom when he got an unexpected gift bag, courtesy of the United Service Organizations, or USO. The care package contained a bar of soap, a disposable camera, a tube of lip balm and a copy of Margaret Truman's Murder at the Pentagon. But what Raveling and many other troops at Baltimore-Washington International Airport yesterday really prized were the 100-minute global phone cards. "As soon as I get there, if I can, I'll phone [his wife and children]
BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn and Jane Bryant Quinn,Washington Post Writers Group | August 24, 1998
PREPAID PHONE cards are hot and getting hotter. Their prices are falling, according to Frost & Sullivan, a consulting firm in Mountain View, Calif. For many consumers, they're the lowest-cost way of making long-distance telephone calls.There are two kinds of phone cards, traditional and prepaid. Traditional cards (often called "calling cards") are issued by your long-distance telephone company. You're billed every month for the calls you've made.Prepaid cards are sold by some 500 national and local firms, reports the Chicago trade paper, Debit Card News.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1998
Edge Communications Inc., a Gaithersburg company that sells prepaid telephone cards, has agreed to be bought.DCI Telecommunications Inc., a Stratford, Conn.-based supplier of long-distance and Internet services, said yesterday that it intends to purchase privately owned Edge for $8 million in cash and stock.Edge, which was founded in 1994 and has eight employees, has capitalized on the growth of the phone-card business, racking up $5.4 million in revenue in 1997.Donnie Gross, Edge's president and chief executive officer, said the DCI transaction is a good deal for his company.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | January 15, 1995
Collectors find out about card shows in lots of places -- magazines, newspapers, fliers at shows and word of mouth.When Merrye Atkinson got hooked on autograph collecting, she knew there had to be a better way to find out where the players she wanted would be."It was hard keeping track," says the veteran magazine worker. "I thought, 'Maybe this should be a magazine.' "Three years ago, she started Pocket Pages, a monthly magazine devoted to show listings. At first it covered only California shows; now it is national.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | July 17, 1994
Baseball fans of the late 20th century can find souvenirs of xTC their favorite team in variety and abundance, almost anywhere in the country.A hundred years ago, it was very different.According to Joe Bosley, an expert on old baseball memorabilia, "Much of the [19th century] stuff you see is from tobacco products." The first baseball cards were produced by Old Judge in the late 1880s as "a gimmick to get you to buy tobacco."There are team and individual photographs -- taken in studios. Items such as pins were usually only produced in championship years.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1996
The baseball card that made headlines five years ago when it was sold at auction for $451,000 is on the block again.That's the 1910 Honus Wagner T-206 card that hockey star Wayne Gretzky and former Los Angeles Kings owner Bruce McNall bought for the record price at a Sotheby's auction. In 1994, Gretzky bought out McNall's half and subsequently sold the card to Treat Entertainment, a distributor of cards, collectibles and accessories.Treat made the card the centerpiece of a classic card give-away, and Patricia Gibbs, a postal clerk from Hollywood, Fla., won the card in a February drawing.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1996
It's back, a year early, bigger and smaller than before.Sports Collectors Digest has added 68 pages to its "1996 Standard Catalog of Baseball Cards," but lighter paper makes its 1,214 pages less hefty than the 1995 edition.The catalog is usually published every two years, but Krause Publications says it brought out its fifth edition a year early to reflect current market trends and to add more than 200 previously unlisted sets. The newly listed sets include regional issues.Phone cards are listed for the first time.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.