Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPhone Calls
IN THE NEWS

Phone Calls

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Janet Brown | July 6, 1993
WE DON'T get them much any more. The phone calls for a dead husband and father are fewer and farther between now. The kids thought it was a real blast, though.Usually, the calls were anonymous, strangers selling something or wanting a donation. By the time we got through with them, they never wanted to tell their names.Sometimes I wished they didn't know ours."Is your father home?"My youngest got a real charge out of answering: "Nope. He's dead."The silence, my children all assured me, was especially long and impressive.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
John G. Schisler, the longtime spokesman and director of public relations for the old Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co., died Sept. 12 at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder. He was 85. "Through and through, it was C&P and what was best for the community," said Betsy Nelson, who retired in 2012 as president of the Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers. "He was diligent and a pragmatist, but had a heart of gold. " The son of J. Harry Schisler, executive vice president of the Fidelity & Deposit Co. of Maryland, and Mildred Hawkins Schisler, a homemaker, John Gardner Schisler was born in Baltimore and raised in Cedarcroft.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
When Kiheem Taylor was charged with kidnapping two teenagers at a Timonium light-rail station and raping one of them, prosecutors struggled with an all-too common problem — they didn't have enough solid evidence. But Taylor gave prosecutors a break when he made phone calls from the Baltimore County Detention Center. Just months earlier, authorities had begun recording inmates' phone calls, and Taylor implicated himself while talking to an ex-girlfriend. Judge Robert N. Dugan said at the time that the call was "overwhelming, damning evidence of [Taylor's]
NEWS
June 2, 2014
Let history decide whether Edward Snowden is a hero or traitor ( "Snowden speaks," May 30). After reading "No Place to Hide" by Glenn Greenwald, that question is moot. I was shocked by what the book revealed. Whether the information Mr. Snowden provided is true or not, we need to know. Believing our government is creating a data base of my phone calls, my emails, my postings on Facebook, my comments on Twitter (if I made any) and my communication through Skype is horrific. It is vital to find out if what Mr. Snowden leaked is, indeed, fact.
NEWS
By Newsday | October 10, 1991
Clarence Thomas and Anita F. Hill -- whose recollections of their on-the-job relationship 10 years ago differ sharply -- do not even agree on a few telephone messages she allegedly left him over the past six years.On Tuesday, supporters of the Supreme Court nominee released logs of 10 phone messages Ms. Hill allegedly left with Judge Thomas' office at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Ms. Hill's messages included such greetings as "just called to say hello" and "wanted to congratulate you on marriage."
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | December 24, 1992
FREDERICK -- Without hesitation, Peggy Phelps, a retired factory worker, marched into Montevue Home, sat down at a makeshift phone booth and "let happiness ring" yesterday.The 71-year-old Frederick woman has visited the county-owned home for assisted living "at least five times" during the past two weeks to call friends and relatives in Louisiana, Nebraska, California, Tennessee, West Virginia and North Carolina -- all free.She is among the hundreds of Frederick County residents who have taken advantage of some holiday charity -- free phone calls to any town in the continental United States -- from Lincoln National Corp.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | July 23, 1996
SANTA CLARA, Calif. -- Intel Corp. yesterday launched a new technology that lets personal computer users make phone calls on the Internet regardless of what type of telephone software is installed on their PCs.Intel will initially make its software -- which was developed by Microsoft Inc. -- available free over the World Wide Web, the graphics-rich portion of the Internet.The move could be a blow to companies such as VocalTec Ltd. and Camelot LTC, among the early pioneers of Internet telephony.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Columnist | September 14, 2006
Now that the primaries are over and the political riff-raff has been sent packing -- oh, not you, William Donald Schaefer, you're a legend, even if it was time for you to go -- I have a small request to make of the remaining candidates for office as we head into the general elections in November. And that request is: Don't call me at home, OK? Don't call if you're running for governor. Don't call if you're running for Congress. Don't call even if you're running for dog catcher. (I don't know, does anyone even run for dog catcher anymore?
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 3, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Senate Republicans asserted yesterday that a series of phone calls made after the 1993 death of White House deputy counsel Vincent W. Foster Jr. reveal that Hillary Rodham Clinton was "deeply involved" in controlling a search of Mr. Foster's office.New York Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato, Republican chairman of the Senate Whitewater committee, said the phone calls -- among Mrs. Clinton, her chief aide and a close friend -- "suggest a clear route of influence" between the first lady and Bernard W. Nussbaum, the White House counsel who kept Justice Department officials and police from reviewing files in Mr. Foster's office.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Sun Staff Writer | October 23, 1994
A nasty confrontation between two candidates running for a House of Delegates seat in Harford County -- complete with profanities and an alleged threat of a lawsuit -- has led to a request for a state investigation into a series of phone calls to voters.Republican Nancy Jacobs of Edgewood, an Annapolis lobbyist for a conservative women's group, this week asked Gene M. Raynor, state election board administrator, to determine if the calls violated election laws. She said the calls misrepresented her views on abortion and that they may violate Maryland's ban against anonymous campaign advertising or literature.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, the top-ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, is proposing to end the bulk collection of telephone data by the National Security Agency - the program at the center of the controversy over the reach of government spying. Ruppersberger would discontinue the government's mass collection of phone data, which has been heavily criticized by privacy rights groups, and instead require intelligence agencies to get court orders on a case-by-case basis before they mine information held by telecommunication companies.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
State officials say they have blocked service at the Baltimore City Detention Center for the contraband cellphones that have long fueled gang activity there. Gov. Martin O'Malley is scheduled to announce Friday the recent activation of a "managed access" system, which officials say is already blocking unauthorized calls by inmates. State officials say the phones have been an essential tool for criminals inside the antiquated facility. Authorities say Black Guerrilla Family leader Tavon White used them to direct a contraband smuggling scheme, transfer payments and alert associates of planned searches.
NEWS
January 1, 2014
It was sad to read that a court has approved the National Security Agency's spying on American citizens ("Judge upholds NSA phone scrutiny," Dec. 28). The agency is gathering "intelligence" on me when I make phone calls and collects the dates and phone numbers called. This is an illegal search and seizure, yet a federal judge in New York ruled that it is constitutional. The only reason would seem to be that he was protecting the NSA. What have I done that permits the NSA to seize my private data?
NEWS
September 3, 2013
How is it that the federal government can track and listen to millions and millions of our phone calls and take action when they feel it's necessary but can't or won't do anything about all of the telemarketing calls I get? Why don't they file a complaint with the National Do-Not-Call Registry? Just asking. Think maybe we should put the NSA in charge of the registry? David Gosey Towson
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tionah Lee and For The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2013
In four seasons of chasing Ali and characters dying (or not dying), nothing could prepare viewers for the best reveal in "Pretty Little Liars" history. OMG! The girls are at Spencer's house when a news brief flashes that an unnamed witness is coming forward with details on Detective Wilden's death. Hanna knows the fate of her mother is in the hands of Travis. Remaining optimistic, the girls believe that he is telling the truth and not part of the A team.  Did someone say A?
NEWS
June 8, 2013
For years, I've been super cautious about my phone calls. I avoid e-mail as much as possible and eschew Facebook and social media. I've nothing to hide, but the thought of the National Security Agency (among others) spying on my day-to-day communications is just sickening ("NSA collects Verizon records of U.S. callers," June 6). This latest news is horrific. Privacy is dead. We have sacrificed our freedom for so-called "security. " Because of cloud computing and NSA's massive, nationwide facilities, data storage is infinite and long lasting.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | January 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- If one sound symbolized Washington in the first days of the Clinton administration, it may have been a busy signal.By the hundreds of thousands, Americans are flooding switchboards at the White House and Congress. A torrent of calls last week helped topple Zoe Baird, President Clinton's choice for attorney general. Now there's a switchboard referendum on Mr. Clinton's plan to allow gays and lesbians in the military.While there's nothing new about people trying to make their voices heard, the electorate today is markedly more alienated from its leaders and determined to play a direct role in the way the country is governed.
NEWS
By Amy P. Ingram and Amy P. Ingram,Contributing Writer | January 27, 1993
An article in yesterday's Anne Arundel County edition incorrectly stated fee structures for Home Alone Assistance. The fees are based on the services a senior citizen receives.5) The Baltimore Sun regrets the errors.Inez Mize, 75, wants to be sure she won't be found like her sister, lying on the floor of her house two days after she died.So she has signed up for Home Alone Assistance, a service that calls senior citizens each day to check up on them, to make sure they wake up, to remind them to take their medication or just to say "Hi."
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
When Kiheem Taylor was charged with kidnapping two teenagers at a Timonium light-rail station and raping one of them, prosecutors struggled with an all-too common problem — they didn't have enough solid evidence. But Taylor gave prosecutors a break when he made phone calls from the Baltimore County Detention Center. Just months earlier, authorities had begun recording inmates' phone calls, and Taylor implicated himself while talking to an ex-girlfriend. Judge Robert N. Dugan said at the time that the call was "overwhelming, damning evidence of [Taylor's]
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
It was Halloween in Baltimore Highlands when Sterlin Corday Matthews donned a "Hellraiser" mask and went out with his friends. Before he returned home, one teen trick-or-treater had been shot to death and two others wounded. Jurors in Baltimore County took less than an hour Thursday to find Matthews, 19, guilty in the 2010 killing of Dequan Burks. The second-degree murder verdict came despite the fact that prosecutors had no gun to present in a case marked by uncooperative witnesses, who reluctantly identified the costumed shooter by his long braids and voice.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.