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NEWS
May 1, 2013
Nobody blames cars for drunk driving, so why do some people blame firearms for gun violence? Might the term "gun violence" be more indicative of a deep, irrational fear of an inanimate object? W.J. Cooper, Salisbury
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NEWS
May 1, 2013
Nobody blames cars for drunk driving, so why do some people blame firearms for gun violence? Might the term "gun violence" be more indicative of a deep, irrational fear of an inanimate object? W.J. Cooper, Salisbury
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FEATURES
July 8, 1997
A national organization dedicated to helping people with "shy bladder syndrome" -- a phobia known clinically as paruresis -- will hold a three-day workshop in Baltimore next week. The event will be a chance for sufferers to discuss and, perhaps, to overcome their fear of using public facilities. It's a phobia that causes some people to stay away from concerts, ballgames or other public events and even to avoid jobs in office buildings and other places that afford little privacy. The meeting, July 18-20, will be based at the student union of the University of Maryland, Baltimore.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2012
The editors of the Associated Press Stylebook discourage the use of the word homophobia , and this is their explanation: "Phobia means irrational, uncontrollable fear, often a form of mental illness. In terms like homophobia, it's often speculation. The reasons for anti-gay feelings or actions may not be apparent. Specifics are better than vague characterizations of a person's general feelings about something. " Their ruling on this point in reasoned, principled, and wrong-headed.  An article at Slate   quotes George Weinberg, the psychologist who popularized the word in 1972, as why he used the term phobia : He identified people displaying an strongly vehement dislike of gay people.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2012
The editors of the Associated Press Stylebook discourage the use of the word homophobia , and this is their explanation: "Phobia means irrational, uncontrollable fear, often a form of mental illness. In terms like homophobia, it's often speculation. The reasons for anti-gay feelings or actions may not be apparent. Specifics are better than vague characterizations of a person's general feelings about something. " Their ruling on this point in reasoned, principled, and wrong-headed.  An article at Slate   quotes George Weinberg, the psychologist who popularized the word in 1972, as why he used the term phobia : He identified people displaying an strongly vehement dislike of gay people.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon & Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon & Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | April 28, 2002
Q. I am a pediatrician concerned about parents' use of two over-the-counter medications. I often feel like a one-woman army trying to combat simultaneous use of acetaminophen (Tylenol) and ibuprofen (Motrin, etc.) for children with fever. Parents sometimes alternate doses as often as every two hours. Some parents are giving these medications together to bring down a fever. Clearly, fever is a physiologic function that helps the body fight infections. I try to educate parents about this, but there seems to be an almost irrational fear of fever in our culture.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON | July 29, 2006
When state police responded to a report that a patient had assaulted his Harford County dentist, they went straight to the frazzled man in the parking lot. Police arrested Aaron Abraham Newman, 34, of Havre de Grace on Tuesday afternoon after he told troopers that while he was being fitted for a mold for dentures he had a panic attack because he has a phobia of dentists. According to charging documents, Newman was having an impression of his mouth taken at Forest Hill Family & Cosmetic Dentistry in the first block of Colgate Drive when he became agitated.
NEWS
January 22, 1993
Escaped murderer Dontay Carter was captured hiding under a bedsheet.Ironically, that's the same reaction many of us had, figuratively at least, to the news that Carter had escaped. Even in a region that buries enough homicide victims yearly to populate a small town, few individuals summon the thunderhead of fear that this 19-year-old has. He gets full-name treatment in the headlines -- -- "Dontay Carter escapes" -- because he's become an almost mythical symbol for the ills of a city and a region.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | February 14, 2004
ABOUT TWO this afternoon, Kathleen Heagney expects to be walking down the aisle of a Virginia church on the arm of her beaming father. She'll be dressed like a princess in a long, white gown with flowing train, and crowned with a glittery band anchoring her veil. Over months of planning, she found herself yearning for traditional flourishes, including a full Catholic mass and a niece singing "Ave Maria," to celebrate this Valentine's Day wedding. After all, it's her first, and she's 50. "I'm probably going to cry," she predicted.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | March 31, 1994
Waves of selling struck Wall Street again yesterday, driving the Dow Jones industrial average down 72.27 points to finish at 3,626.75, its lowest close since November. Officials imposed "computerized program trading curbs" twice during the gloomy session.With just today to go before the first quarter ends, the Dow is down 127 points, or 3.4 percent, from the beginning of the year.So, with stock and bond markets tumbling, let's turn to lighter topics, including this little quiz:TEST YOUR MEMORY: Many local firms, past and present, have spent hundreds of thousands of dollars popularizing their slogans.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON | July 29, 2006
When state police responded to a report that a patient had assaulted his Harford County dentist, they went straight to the frazzled man in the parking lot. Police arrested Aaron Abraham Newman, 34, of Havre de Grace on Tuesday afternoon after he told troopers that while he was being fitted for a mold for dentures he had a panic attack because he has a phobia of dentists. According to charging documents, Newman was having an impression of his mouth taken at Forest Hill Family & Cosmetic Dentistry in the first block of Colgate Drive when he became agitated.
FEATURES
By Tom Jicha and Tom Jicha,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | July 8, 2005
Tony Shalhoub has spent so much time in Monk's head that the obsessive-compulsive detective has gotten into the actor's head. "I never had a problem shaking hands," Shalhoub said. "Now I do." As the USA series enters its fourth season, it hasn't quite gotten to the stage where Shalhoub whips out a tissue to wipe his hands after shaking someone else's, Shalhoub said. "But I do have the ugly thoughts." Monk's ugly thoughts, a product of every conceivable phobia, make for some of the most beautifully unconventional detective work this side of Columbo.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Celia Wren and Celia Wren,NEWSDAY | October 3, 2004
NEW YORK - It's 11:30 a.m. on a sunny Thursday, and Amy Fine Collins, special correspondent for Vanity Fair, is nestled in a Bentley Continental GT that's cruising along Park Avenue at a leisurely pace. This situation is an anomaly, and it's not just that the longtime New Yorker usually lives in the fast lane, lunching at Le Cirque, penning articles about Coco Chanel and Luchino Visconti and zipping off to California for the Vanity Fair Oscar party. No, what's remarkable is that Collins is ensconced in the Bentley's back seat - even though she has recently surmounted a lifelong driving phobia, as chronicled in her new book, The God of Driving (Simon & Schuster, $24)
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | February 14, 2004
ABOUT TWO this afternoon, Kathleen Heagney expects to be walking down the aisle of a Virginia church on the arm of her beaming father. She'll be dressed like a princess in a long, white gown with flowing train, and crowned with a glittery band anchoring her veil. Over months of planning, she found herself yearning for traditional flourishes, including a full Catholic mass and a niece singing "Ave Maria," to celebrate this Valentine's Day wedding. After all, it's her first, and she's 50. "I'm probably going to cry," she predicted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Dawn C. Chmielewski,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 29, 2004
Like many a movie buff, Dee Schwab hates the inconvenience of driving to the video rental store almost as much as paying the hefty late fees that inevitably spark arguments with her husband. She's precisely the consumer Walt Disney had in mind for its new video-on-demand service, called MovieBeam. It delivers 100 movies to a box on top of the television set. All consumers need to do to rent a movie is click the remote control. "I don't have to worry about getting it back on time," said Schwab, a mother of three who lives in Jacksonville, Fla. "And the fact that there are 100 movies in the library at any one time, if you're home and it's a rainy Friday night, there's going to be something that you want to see."
NEWS
July 10, 2003
New Windsor Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church will present a luncheon and program at noon Wednesday in the church. Church Elder Dan Holler, a trauma and phobia specialist at Liberty Christian Counseling Service in Sykesville, will discuss fears and phobias. Subjects will include the fear of heights, spiders, bridges, elevators, the dark and needles. A lunch of soup and bread will be served after the program. The public is welcome. Programs will be held monthly and include guest speakers and different topics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Celia Wren and Celia Wren,NEWSDAY | October 3, 2004
NEW YORK - It's 11:30 a.m. on a sunny Thursday, and Amy Fine Collins, special correspondent for Vanity Fair, is nestled in a Bentley Continental GT that's cruising along Park Avenue at a leisurely pace. This situation is an anomaly, and it's not just that the longtime New Yorker usually lives in the fast lane, lunching at Le Cirque, penning articles about Coco Chanel and Luchino Visconti and zipping off to California for the Vanity Fair Oscar party. No, what's remarkable is that Collins is ensconced in the Bentley's back seat - even though she has recently surmounted a lifelong driving phobia, as chronicled in her new book, The God of Driving (Simon & Schuster, $24)
NEWS
By TRB | March 12, 1993
Washington. -- When I was 25, I lived in San Francisco and enrolled in a large ''health-maintenance organization.'' I'm afraid the relationship ended badly.At the time, I was experiencing bouts of fatigue -- this was before anybody had heard of ''chronic fatigue syndrome.'' I was given a few standard tests at the central clinic, and then assigned to a rather unemotional doctor with a Germanic accent. After some questions, he pronounced his diagnosis: ''Mr. Kaus, zere is nussink physically wrong viz you.''I haven't enrolled in an HMO since.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon & Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon & Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | April 28, 2002
Q. I am a pediatrician concerned about parents' use of two over-the-counter medications. I often feel like a one-woman army trying to combat simultaneous use of acetaminophen (Tylenol) and ibuprofen (Motrin, etc.) for children with fever. Parents sometimes alternate doses as often as every two hours. Some parents are giving these medications together to bring down a fever. Clearly, fever is a physiologic function that helps the body fight infections. I try to educate parents about this, but there seems to be an almost irrational fear of fever in our culture.
FEATURES
July 8, 1997
A national organization dedicated to helping people with "shy bladder syndrome" -- a phobia known clinically as paruresis -- will hold a three-day workshop in Baltimore next week. The event will be a chance for sufferers to discuss and, perhaps, to overcome their fear of using public facilities. It's a phobia that causes some people to stay away from concerts, ballgames or other public events and even to avoid jobs in office buildings and other places that afford little privacy. The meeting, July 18-20, will be based at the student union of the University of Maryland, Baltimore.
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