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NEWS
November 21, 1991
What strange bedfellows the peace process in Cambodia makes. Norodom Sihanouk, the once and future king or president, returned to a palace restored for him, and announced that he should be a figurehead and that three top leaders of the Khmer Rouge, who murdered his children and grandchildren in the 1970s, should be tried for mass murder.He omitted specificity on whether this should apply to the two Khmer Rouge members of the Supreme National Council, which he heads, the transitional regime that is making the peace.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Vaddey Ratner didn't expect much when she first took on the project of writing a novel about a young Cambodian girl and her family who are forced into the countryside by the Khmer Rouge as part of the communist group's program of genocide that began in 1975. It was just something that she needed to do. "I sat down to write as an act of mourning the ghosts and spirits, honoring those lost lives," she explains. "In the Shadow of the Banyan," Ratner's first novel, is based on her experiences as a child.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 22, 1991
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- Cambodia's fragile peace process came to a halt yesterday when the government told leaders of the Khmer Rouge to stay out of the country as major protest demonstrations -- the first since before the Khmer Rouge reign of terror here in the 1970s that took a million lives -- swept through Phnom Penh's streets.While the demonstrations were occasioned by the expected return of two of the Khmer Rouge's most hated leaders, they seemed more directed yesterday at the Vietnam-backed government.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 1, 1998
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- Much of the world may have signed a treaty pledging to eliminate land mines, but in war-ravaged Cambodia -- with more mines per capita than any other country -- the problem isn't ready to go away.Communist Khmer Rouge guerrillas and royalist rebels battling Cambodian regulars in the jungles of northwest Cambodia are still laying mines, Western diplomatic sources say. For all practical purposes, they add, the treaty signed in Ottawa in early December is irrelevant, for now at least, in this troubled nation.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 17, 1991
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- In his first speech inside Cambodia in two decades, Prince Norodom Sihanouk told a throng in front of the royal palace yesterday that his former enemies in the Phnom Penh government had done a good job and that his former allies in the hard-line Khmer Rouge should be tried as war criminals.At his first news conference since returning to the country Thursday, a jovial Prince Sihanouk, 69, announced the formation of a political coalition consisting of the ruling Cambodian People's Party in Phnom Penh and the Sihanouk political party, which is headed by his son, Prince Norodom Ranariddh.
NEWS
By The New York Times contributed to this article | November 18, 1991
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP) -- Sophan Nary broke down in tears of rage yesterday when told that the Khmer Rouge leaders who killed her entire family had returned and were staying next door to her noodle shop."
NEWS
September 19, 1996
KING NORODOM SIHANOUK offended many people's sense of humanity and many Cambodians' thirst for justice or vengeance when he granted amnesty to Ieng Sary from his sentence of death handed out in absentia in 1979 when the Khmer Rouge regime disintegrated.Ieng Sary was the No. 2 boss of that fanatical Communist movement that caused the death of 1 million to 2 million of its 7 million compatriots while in power from 1975 to 1979. He has remained second in command to the hated Pol Pot in camps on the Thai border, controlling illicit gem and other trades.
NEWS
By Sydney H. Schanberg | April 6, 1995
EVERY ONCE in a while, amid the brain-numbing, forest-destroying spew of paper that crosses a reporter's desk, there's a report worth reading. One of these landed on my desk last week.In a mere 23 pages, Oxfam America, the private, third-world development organization, has reminded us that Cambodia is still the sad, little, broken country that all the "great" powers turned it into in the 1970s.The Oxfam report is worth reading because it pulls at us to look squarely at something we all know but would rather not confront: our share of the responsibility for having made this demoralized country a monument to how powerful nations can swallow small ones and then spit them out when their usefulness is over.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 24, 1993
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- With a threat by Khmer Rouge guerrillas to disrupt the election largely unrealized, Cambodians thronged to the polls yesterday amid initial signs of an unexpectedly heavy and enthusiastic turnout."
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | March 21, 1991
O Koko, Cambodia. There are, they say, 7,000 people living in thatched shelters or with no shelter here in the middle of what we would call nowhere, dry and dusty fields 40 miles southwest of Phnom Penh.They are women and children, widows and orphans. Most Cambodians are, because the men are at war or were killed in the murderous years of Khmer Rouge rule.They are, officially, ''displaced persons,'' Cambodians moved by government troops from mountain villages in areas now controlled, more or less, by the Khmer Rouge.
NEWS
September 19, 1996
KING NORODOM SIHANOUK offended many people's sense of humanity and many Cambodians' thirst for justice or vengeance when he granted amnesty to Ieng Sary from his sentence of death handed out in absentia in 1979 when the Khmer Rouge regime disintegrated.Ieng Sary was the No. 2 boss of that fanatical Communist movement that caused the death of 1 million to 2 million of its 7 million compatriots while in power from 1975 to 1979. He has remained second in command to the hated Pol Pot in camps on the Thai border, controlling illicit gem and other trades.
NEWS
By Sydney H. Schanberg | April 6, 1995
EVERY ONCE in a while, amid the brain-numbing, forest-destroying spew of paper that crosses a reporter's desk, there's a report worth reading. One of these landed on my desk last week.In a mere 23 pages, Oxfam America, the private, third-world development organization, has reminded us that Cambodia is still the sad, little, broken country that all the "great" powers turned it into in the 1970s.The Oxfam report is worth reading because it pulls at us to look squarely at something we all know but would rather not confront: our share of the responsibility for having made this demoralized country a monument to how powerful nations can swallow small ones and then spit them out when their usefulness is over.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 24, 1993
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- With a threat by Khmer Rouge guerrillas to disrupt the election largely unrealized, Cambodians thronged to the polls yesterday amid initial signs of an unexpectedly heavy and enthusiastic turnout."
NEWS
By Peter S. Goodman and Peter S. Goodman,Contributing Writer | June 22, 1992
PHNOM PENH -- Optimism flows easily here these days.The long-running civil war has ended, at least on paper. The exiled god-king, Prince Norodom Sihanouk, whose ouster in 1970 marked the start of all the trouble, is back in the fairy-tale Royal Palace on the banks of the Mekong river. And the largest, most expensive peacekeeping operation in the history of the United Nations has taken over the town, transforming it from a dazed and desolate shell of a city into a kind of madhouse.White U.N. vehicles dominate the now-bustling traffic, and an international assortment of blue-bereted soldiers pack the once-deserted hotels and restaurants.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 22, 1991
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- Cambodia's fragile peace process came to a halt yesterday when the government told leaders of the Khmer Rouge to stay out of the country as major protest demonstrations -- the first since before the Khmer Rouge reign of terror here in the 1970s that took a million lives -- swept through Phnom Penh's streets.While the demonstrations were occasioned by the expected return of two of the Khmer Rouge's most hated leaders, they seemed more directed yesterday at the Vietnam-backed government.
NEWS
December 5, 1991
If the United Nations does not want the murderous Khmer Rouge to re-ignite the Cambodia civil war, U.N. troops in large numbers will guard the hated Khmer Rouge representatives in Phnom Penh from the understandable wrath of the surviving Khmer people.Hun Sen, the one-time Khmer Rouge defector who was installed as prime minister of Cambodia by Vietnamese invaders, is dedicated to keeping the fanatic faction that governed and murdered from 1975 through 1978 out of power. To that end he is sworn to protect their persons and insure their role in the transition.
NEWS
By Peter S. Goodman and Peter S. Goodman,Contributing Writer | June 22, 1992
PHNOM PENH -- Optimism flows easily here these days.The long-running civil war has ended, at least on paper. The exiled god-king, Prince Norodom Sihanouk, whose ouster in 1970 marked the start of all the trouble, is back in the fairy-tale Royal Palace on the banks of the Mekong river. And the largest, most expensive peacekeeping operation in the history of the United Nations has taken over the town, transforming it from a dazed and desolate shell of a city into a kind of madhouse.White U.N. vehicles dominate the now-bustling traffic, and an international assortment of blue-bereted soldiers pack the once-deserted hotels and restaurants.
NEWS
November 21, 1991
What strange bedfellows the peace process in Cambodia makes. Norodom Sihanouk, the once and future king or president, returned to a palace restored for him, and announced that he should be a figurehead and that three top leaders of the Khmer Rouge, who murdered his children and grandchildren in the 1970s, should be tried for mass murder.He omitted specificity on whether this should apply to the two Khmer Rouge members of the Supreme National Council, which he heads, the transitional regime that is making the peace.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | November 20, 1991
OF ALL the extraordinary emotional events of the past few years, few have exceeded the return this week of the legendary Prince Sihanouk to Cambodia.The 69-year-old monarch, a white-haired figure now in place of the black-haired young prince, returned to his old capital of Phnom Penh, in olden days the most beautiful and storied city in Southeast Asia. He returned to the joy of saffron-robed Buddhist monks, classic Khmer dancers and jewel-encrusted silk costumes, and hundreds of thousands of Cambodians who remember all too well the years of the Khmer Rouge slaughter.
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