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By Kathy Van Mullekom and Kathy Van Mullekom,Knight Ridder / Tribune | June 30, 2002
If you like a long-blooming, disease-resistant perennial, you'll want to turn some garden space over to a phlox called David. Best of all, he'll attract lots of butterflies to your gardens. In addition, you'll have an award-winning plant among your perennials because Phlox 'David' has been named the 2002 Perennial Plant of the Year by the nonprofit, educational Perennial Plant Association. The perennial -- Phlox paniculata, a member of the Polemoniaceae family -- is native from New York to Georgia, and it's cold-hardy in Zones 4-9. 'David' grows upright, reaching 36 to 40 inches tall, but it produces strong stems that stand sturdy in wind and weather.
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By Kathy Hudson | August 3, 2011
Over the last scorching weekend, my husband and I were just wondering what had happened to those cloudy, drizzly summer days of yesteryear. We could not think of one this summer, or even a few last summer.   Et voila! Wednesday comes. We awoke to clouds and cooler temperatures. Not cool, mind you, but cool-ER. It even drizzled some at mid-morning. At 1 p.m. our thermometer said only 84 degrees. I thought I was dreaming. I went to my computer: 84, the online weather said, too.   I went outside to celebrate the temperature drop and cloud cover by weeding.
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EXPLORE
By Kathy Hudson | August 3, 2011
Over the last scorching weekend, my husband and I were just wondering what had happened to those cloudy, drizzly summer days of yesteryear. We could not think of one this summer, or even a few last summer.   Et voila! Wednesday comes. We awoke to clouds and cooler temperatures. Not cool, mind you, but cool-ER. It even drizzled some at mid-morning. At 1 p.m. our thermometer said only 84 degrees. I thought I was dreaming. I went to my computer: 84, the online weather said, too.   I went outside to celebrate the temperature drop and cloud cover by weeding.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN COLUMNIST | June 11, 2006
There is a picket fence around my cozy two-story house, and just inside its borders is my version of an English cottage garden. My crispy, wilting, gasping version of an English cottage garden. It is only June, but summer has hit Maryland like a brick in the nose after a very dry spring, and my plans for a lush and riotous perennial border are fading in the heat. "When are you going to realize that we don't live in England?" asked Bob, my neighbor and gardening mentor, as he looked over my foxgloves.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN REPORTER | May 28, 2006
GARDENING FIND MUMZ THE WORD Common fungi are all too common during hot, humid Maryland summers. You know them as mildew on phlox and bee balm, black spot on roses and rust on hollyhocks. Fungal diseases ruin our tomato crops and disfigure our black-eyed Susans. Broad spectrum fungicides are one answer. But if you are concerned about the long-term and environmental impact of these products, Fine Gardening magazine offers these holistic tips. Choose plants wisely. Many zinnias, garden phloxes, roses, crabapples and bee balms now have disease-resistant cultivars.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1995
How well a police officer can identify a driver who he says nearly collided with him on a misty November night is what jurors have to decide in a possession of marijuana case against a 25-year-old Baltimore County man, attorneys said yesterday.During opening statements yesterday, Carroll County public defender Daniel Shemer maintained that police misidentified his client, Brian Lamont Magruder, as the man whose car nearly collided with Westminster Pfc. Mark A. Shobert's vehicle at a 7-11 store about 11:30 p.m. Nov. 15.Police have said the man drove east on Route 140 from the convenience store parking lot and turned into Koons Toyota, about one-tenth of a mile away.
NEWS
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,Special to the Sun | August 27, 2000
Late August in the garden can be very fine. Traditionally, it is a tranquil and languorous time because it is too hot to do anything. It is a good time to sit on the back porch with a glass of iced tea and be lazy. This can get a gardener in a lot of trouble, however, this sitting around stuff. The doldrums are apt to sneak right up on us. The problem is that gardens are often boring in late summer. To be sure, many of us have daffodils and tulips in April, azaleas and dogwoods in May, and iris and roses in June.
FEATURES
By Mike Klingaman | August 22, 1993
The William Paca House maintains a perfectly restored 18th-century formal garden with stylish boxwood topiaries and genteel antique roses.Two miles away, there's a yard filled with plants from the other side of the tracks, plants that led scraggly, pathetic lives until their adoption.They are two very different gardens, but both are maintained by the same person.Lucy Coggin is director of the pristine Paca Garden in Annapolis. She is also nursemaid to dozens of stray plants, both abused and abandoned, which she found -- literally -- on the side of the road.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN COLUMNIST | June 11, 2006
There is a picket fence around my cozy two-story house, and just inside its borders is my version of an English cottage garden. My crispy, wilting, gasping version of an English cottage garden. It is only June, but summer has hit Maryland like a brick in the nose after a very dry spring, and my plans for a lush and riotous perennial border are fading in the heat. "When are you going to realize that we don't live in England?" asked Bob, my neighbor and gardening mentor, as he looked over my foxgloves.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
My friend and I both saw a bright red fuzzy insect on the ground. Never saw anything like it before! She thinks it's an ant, but I think it's a wasp. What say you? Red velvet ants are wasps, but the females are wingless and that's why they look like ants darting about on the ground. The adult males have wings but no red hair like the females. Males also can't sting, but the females pack quite a wallop, earning them the nicknames of "cow-killer" and "mule-killer. " Most of the body is black, but in the insect world red coloring means danger, and they aren't kidding.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN REPORTER | May 28, 2006
GARDENING FIND MUMZ THE WORD Common fungi are all too common during hot, humid Maryland summers. You know them as mildew on phlox and bee balm, black spot on roses and rust on hollyhocks. Fungal diseases ruin our tomato crops and disfigure our black-eyed Susans. Broad spectrum fungicides are one answer. But if you are concerned about the long-term and environmental impact of these products, Fine Gardening magazine offers these holistic tips. Choose plants wisely. Many zinnias, garden phloxes, roses, crabapples and bee balms now have disease-resistant cultivars.
NEWS
By Kathy Van Mullekom and Kathy Van Mullekom,Knight Ridder / Tribune | June 30, 2002
If you like a long-blooming, disease-resistant perennial, you'll want to turn some garden space over to a phlox called David. Best of all, he'll attract lots of butterflies to your gardens. In addition, you'll have an award-winning plant among your perennials because Phlox 'David' has been named the 2002 Perennial Plant of the Year by the nonprofit, educational Perennial Plant Association. The perennial -- Phlox paniculata, a member of the Polemoniaceae family -- is native from New York to Georgia, and it's cold-hardy in Zones 4-9. 'David' grows upright, reaching 36 to 40 inches tall, but it produces strong stems that stand sturdy in wind and weather.
NEWS
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,Special to the Sun | August 27, 2000
Late August in the garden can be very fine. Traditionally, it is a tranquil and languorous time because it is too hot to do anything. It is a good time to sit on the back porch with a glass of iced tea and be lazy. This can get a gardener in a lot of trouble, however, this sitting around stuff. The doldrums are apt to sneak right up on us. The problem is that gardens are often boring in late summer. To be sure, many of us have daffodils and tulips in April, azaleas and dogwoods in May, and iris and roses in June.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1995
How well a police officer can identify a driver who he says nearly collided with him on a misty November night is what jurors have to decide in a possession of marijuana case against a 25-year-old Baltimore County man, attorneys said yesterday.During opening statements yesterday, Carroll County public defender Daniel Shemer maintained that police misidentified his client, Brian Lamont Magruder, as the man whose car nearly collided with Westminster Pfc. Mark A. Shobert's vehicle at a 7-11 store about 11:30 p.m. Nov. 15.Police have said the man drove east on Route 140 from the convenience store parking lot and turned into Koons Toyota, about one-tenth of a mile away.
FEATURES
By Mike Klingaman | August 22, 1993
The William Paca House maintains a perfectly restored 18th-century formal garden with stylish boxwood topiaries and genteel antique roses.Two miles away, there's a yard filled with plants from the other side of the tracks, plants that led scraggly, pathetic lives until their adoption.They are two very different gardens, but both are maintained by the same person.Lucy Coggin is director of the pristine Paca Garden in Annapolis. She is also nursemaid to dozens of stray plants, both abused and abandoned, which she found -- literally -- on the side of the road.
NEWS
By Caroline Seebohm | June 21, 1991
THE visitor to America's suburban gardens during this year's blooming season might notice a disturbing phenomenon.Many of these back yards seem colorful, but isn't there something oddly similar about their colors?Isn't it strange that in garden after garden the rows of peonies always include three identical colors -- white, pink and dark red?Isn't it odd that along the driveways and rockeries, clumps of similar pink, mauve and white creeping phlox are in flower?Do our eyes deceive us, or is that rather dull pink rose growing in hedge-like profusion exactly the same rather dull pink rose planted in an identical row along almost every fence in the neighborhood?
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld | May 10, 2008
Can I grow corn in a backyard vegetable garden? You sure can. Corn pollen is spread by wind, so you'll get the best kernel production by planting corn in blocks of rows. You'll need at least three or four short rows, 2 to 3 feet apart. Sow seeds every 9 to 12 inches in the row after danger of frost has passed and soil is warm. Corn is a "heavy feeder." Fertilize when plants are 12 to 18 inches high and again when tassels appear. Do not remove suckers; they improve yield. Expect 10 to 20 ears per 10-foot row. I want to add some natives to my flower garden.
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