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NEWS
August 23, 2012
A Neanderthal who spits out stupid comments about how women rarely become pregnant during a "legitimate rape" sits on the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology? Heaven help us! Rep. Todd Akin should quickly resign and go spout his reactionary philosophy inside the walls of some storefront. Judy Chernak, Pikesville
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
According to coach Ed Hottle, Stevenson's best start in school history has been a long time coming. It's also a product of inspired play by the defense. Through four games, no opponent has scored more than 19 points in a single game against the Mustangs, who are tied for 12th in Division III in points allowed (9.8), rank 18th in yards surrendered (247.8), are tied for fourth in interceptions (nine) and eighth in takeaways (12). So how does a defense that in 2013 allowed 24.2 points and 370.2 yards per game and collected 11 interceptions among their 17 takeaways improve so dramatically?
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NEWS
December 28, 2011
It is good to see a Democrat - Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot - who does not pay homage to the tax and spend (as much as they can get away with) economic philosophy of the left ("Franchot drifts right," Dec. 26). Hopefully, he is keeping our alabaster nanny, Gov. Martin O'Malley, awake at nights. Common sense (and not political vote buying) has to prevail at some point. Lyle Rescott, Marriottsville
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
Orioles manager Buck Showalter has been shuffling his pitching staff all season. If he can find a way to get a starter some rest or bring an extra pitcher into the bullpen for a day or two, he'll do it. The obvious result is that his relievers, for the most part, have maintained their health while pitching effectively. Heading into Saturday's game against the New York Yankees, Orioles relievers had the fourth-best ERA in the American League and sixth-most innings pitched. Only closer Zach Britton was among the league's top 10 in appearances, with 66. Darren O'Day was tied for 25th, with 62, and neither pitched in Saturday's 3-2 loss.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
Walt Fuchs, who taught philosophy at Towson University for more than four decades, died of cancer Feb. 11 in a hospital in Gottingen, Germany. The Towson resident was 71. Born Wolfgang Walter Fuchs in Berlin and raised in Pittsburgh, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in philosophy from Duquesne University and a doctorate at Pennsylvania State University. He was a specialist in phenomenology and existential philosophy. He joined the faculty at Towson University in 1969 and taught until 2013.
SPORTS
July 15, 2013
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 20, 2004
EACH OF us lives with a sword over his head. Martin O'Malley is Robert Ehrlich's. The mayor of Baltimore stepped into the swarming crowd on the main floor of the State House the other day, and drew an endless line of reporters and television cameras. The governor of Maryland, meanwhile, descended a wide staircase with a sizable entourage bundled around him, and barely a head turned. This is a snapshot, not an exact popular measurement. Both men have star quality. But the moment tells us, as the General Assembly begins to get serious this week, that there is more than one person with a voice waiting to be heard - and more than one point of view.
NEWS
April 22, 2002
Arthur G. Madden, 90, philosophy professor Arthur G. Madden, a retired philosophy professor at Towson University and in Loyola College's evening division, died of renal failure Friday at his home in Sea Girt, N.J. He was 90. Born in New York City, Dr. Madden earned his master's degree from Columbia University and his doctorate from Fordham University and began his teaching career at St. Peter's Preparatory School in New Jersey. He moved to the Baltimore area after joining the faculty of Mount St. Agnes College as a philosophy professor in 1943.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | February 23, 2007
About a month ago, the Ravens revealed a new philosophy at the end-of-the-season news conference in which they stated they wouldn't mortgage the future for the present. Yesterday, they stayed with that approach, basically allowing Pro Bowl outside linebacker Adalius Thomas to become an unrestricted free agent. The Ravens had until 4 p.m. yesterday to put the franchise tag on Thomas or allow him to begin negotiating with other teams next Friday, and they chose to let Thomas test his value.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 14, 1998
"FOR THE Love of Wisdom," a philosophy telecourse taught by Howard Community College philosophy Professor Helen B. Mitchell, will be available nationally this spring.Cable Eight, the Howard Community College station that produced the course, is completing details on a distribution agreement with the Public Broadcasting System Adult Learning Satellite Service.The telecourse, introduced locally last fall, is based on Mitchell's textbook, "Roots of Wisdom," and an accompanying reader, "Roots of World Wisdom."
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | August 24, 2014
Now that it has become clear the Orioles will be without third baseman Manny Machado for the remainder of the season, the club's front office is going to have to decide just how confident it is in the ability of the current roster to hold on to the top spot in the American League East and make a strong postseason run. And that's not the only troublesome question Orioles executive vice president Dan Duquette and manager Buck Showalter will have...
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
Chef-prepared dishes to sample and freshly picked local produce to buy - what could be more appetizing in July when local harvests are peaking? Mix in socializing with like-minded folks who care where their food comes from and a menu of short documentary films, and you've got the recipe for the fifth annual Howard County Film Feastival on Tuesday, an event that is free and open to the public. The Feastival, at Clark's Elioak Farm off Route 108 near Centennial Lane, also helps launch the 2014 Farm-2-Table weeks - with a theme of "Love Local" - at 23 restaurants around the county starting Monday.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
Walt Fuchs, who taught philosophy at Towson University for more than four decades, died of cancer Feb. 11 in a hospital in Gottingen, Germany. The Towson resident was 71. Born Wolfgang Walter Fuchs in Berlin and raised in Pittsburgh, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in philosophy from Duquesne University and a doctorate at Pennsylvania State University. He was a specialist in phenomenology and existential philosophy. He joined the faculty at Towson University in 1969 and taught until 2013.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 14, 2013
In a December 4 speech, President Obama declared income "inequality" to be "the defining challenge of our time. " It is time for me to come clean; to own up to a dark secret I have been hiding most of my life. It is embarrassing to admit it, but I suffer from income inequality. Yes, there are hundreds of thousands, perhaps millions of people who make more money than I do and it has affected my life in ways too numerous to recount. Starting with my first summer job as a bellhop and kitchen worker at a hotel in  Maine when I was 14, I kept records of the amount of money I earned.
BUSINESS
By Marianne Amoss, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
The first indication that KEYW Corp. takes a different approach to business is its name, an adaptation of the airport code for Key West. Then there are the patio furniture in meeting rooms, the parrot mascot and the Jimmy Buffett tune that plays when callers are put on hold. But it's not to be construed as goofing off. “We're not walking around in sandals and shorts,” CEO Len Moodispaw said. “If you were to look at Silicon Valley, which traditionally has been blue jeans and laid-back, we're more like that because of the high-tech workforce we have.” An engineering services firm, KEYW works with software, hardware and systems engineers to develop capabilities and technologies related to cybersecurity, counterterrorism and geospatial intelligence.
SPORTS
July 15, 2013
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | January 30, 1994
Every Monday, in the bowels of the maximum-security Maryland Penitentiary, Drew Leder talks with inmates about power and drug tests, rehabilitation and stiff prison penalties, violence and forgiveness.For the prisoners, the class helps them learn how to be free, even within the prison's grim stone walls.For the Loyola College philosophy professor, these dialogues are a way to test what he has learned from great philosophers.Personal growth, intellectual pursuit and social reform are one and the same for Dr. Leder.
NEWS
By Wiley A. Hall 3rd | September 8, 1992
There was good news and bad news last week following the report that on any given day well over half of the city's young black men are either in jail, in court, on parole or being sought by police.The heartening aspect of this dismal finding was that the city's fathers proved themselves to be intelligent and sensitive men.They didn't deny the findings, they didn't quibble over numbers, they didn't rage about some conspiracy to make them look bad. Instead, the mayor, the chief of police and the city state's attorney joined in our lamentations.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | May 9, 2013
At an investment conference last week, Harvard historian Niall Ferguson created a huge mess for himself. He glibly speculated that maybe because economist John Maynard Keynes was a childless, "effete" homosexual, he embraced a doctrine that favored immediate economic gratification. Keynes' bon mot "in the long run, we are all dead" takes on new meaning when you realize he didn't have kids to worry about. Following the usual script, but at a much faster clip, an uproar ensued on Twitter and in various blogs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2013
Dr. Kenneth B. Kochmann, a former social worker who became a physician later in life, died March 8 of multiple myeloma at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 63. The son of German immigrant parents — his father was a traveling salesman and his mother a homemaker — Kenneth B. Kochmann was born in New York City and raised in Port Washington, N.Y., where he graduated in 1967 from Paul D. Schreiber High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1971 in philosophy from Union College in Schenectady, N.Y., and a master's degree in philosophy from the State University of New York at Albany.
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