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By Eric Adams | June 21, 1991
An article in the Today section yesterday listed an incorrect time for "The Peacemakers" on Channel 13. The show airs at 7 p.m. Sunday.An alternative look at the Middle East situation will be presented Sunday night at 8 on Channel 13 with "The Peacemakers," a documentary by former "Evening Magazine" host Donna Hamilton and her husband, David Paulson, who have created the Mockingbird Company, an independent TV production firm.In the wake of U.S. efforts to orchestrate a post-Gulf War peace conference in the Middle East, the show focuses on the subdued voices within Israel that speak out for peace and understanding between the conflicting cultures.
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By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Frostburg State had sprinted to a 4-0 start - a first in the program's four-year history - but hadn't taken a true litmus test until Saturday when the team clashed with No. 7 Washington College. The Shoremen emerged with a 12-7 victory, but it wasn't easy. The Bobcats trailed 8-7 after senior attackman Ryan Serio's fourth goal of the contest with 12 minutes, 41 seconds left in the fourth quarter before Washington College closed out the game with four unanswered tallies. “I think we hung with them for about three and a half quarters and then they got the last few goals and ended a little stronger than we did,” Frostburg State coach Tommy Pearce said Monday afternoon.
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NEWS
June 7, 2004
Steve Lacy, 69, an American soprano saxophonist who spent more than half of his 50-year career living in Europe and helped legitimize his instrument in postwar jazz, died Friday in Boston. The cause was cancer, according to an announcement from the New England Conservatory of Music, where he had been teaching since 2002. After performing in New York, his hometown, Mr. Lacy, who was born Steven Lackritz, moved to Italy and France, and became the most Europeanized of all expatriate American jazz musicians.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
No. 7 UMBC suffered its first loss of the season when Delaware pulled off a 1-0 upset in double overtime Tuesday night at Retriever Soccer Park. The loss was the team's first since a 2-1 defeat to Albany on Oct. 10 of last year, snapping an unbeaten streak of 18 games. Retrievers coach Pete Caringi would not have been faulted for being upset about the loss, but he sounded philosophical about the outcome, which dropped the team to 9-1-0 this fall. “You hate to lose, and obviously, we hadn't lost in a long time,” he said Wednesday morning.
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By Ron Grossman and Ron Grossman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 16, 2003
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - The arguing began the instant professor May Sim finished charting "man's journey from being uneducated to being educated," as she summed up the philosophical position she had staked out. Someone asked if she really thought the human soul could come to know Truth? Wouldn't it blink at the last moment, like an eye blinded by the sun's radiance? Someone else sputtered that Plato, Sim's intellectual hero, was just plain wrong about the erotic dimension of learning. One participant half playfully accused another of being a "neo-atomist" - that is, of regarding reality as being composed of tiny bits of soul-less matter.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
Donte' Stallworth rides with the philosophers of life in his quiet moments, but he runs with the cornerbacks for a living in the raucous world of the NFL. The Ravens veteran wide receiver is as conversant on Carl Jung or William Shakespeare as he is on Vontae Davis, Jason Allen or Sean Smith, the trio of Miami Dolphins' cornerbacks that he'll likely run up against Sunday in M&T Bank Stadium. The former psychology major at Tennessee has taken to tweeting inspirational messages from philosophers and famous authors, including Jung ("Your visions will become clear only when you can look into your own heart.
NEWS
By Michael Corbin | December 5, 2002
BALTIMORE NATIVE SON John Rawls died last week. His obituary writers included encomia like "most important political thinker of the 20th century," "best theorist of his generation," "America's leading political philosopher." But the average American probably has never heard of the James Bryant Conant university professor emeritus at Harvard, much less cracked the cover of his 1971 magnum opus and now classic, A Theory of Justice. Americans don't put much faith in philosophers and have never had much use for tweedy professors when it comes to the rough and tumble of politics.
NEWS
By Robert Lee Hotz and Robert Lee Hotz,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 6, 1998
With a brain scanner, a University of Pennsylvania scientist eavesdrops on the mind of a meditating Buddhist monk, sifting through neurons for evidence of spiritual grace.Using skin sensors, a researcher at University of California, San Diego, measures the power of holy words by testing how synapses respond to religious texts.A neuropsychiatrist at New York University assesses the effects of prayer. Another scientist measures brain function among those who report feelings of a union with God and the cosmos.
NEWS
By Jonah Penne | December 22, 2009
C hristmas is almost here, and this year video games are again among the most popular gift items. They also spark the most controversy. Electronic entertainment, from Xbox to online multiplayer games, often features brutal and bloody violence. This understandably concerns parents and teachers. But this sort of entertainment also promises a kind of wild freedom that is comparable, in some ways, to what philosophers describe as a "state of nature." The state of nature, according to political philosophers, is a hypothetical world in which humans exist without laws, principles and central authority.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | November 1, 2007
Bright chill October days of sweet dry smells, smoke and apples and pigskin, memories of touch football games on grassy fields strewn with dry leaves. "You go deep," our QB said, thinking that a big, lanky kid like me must be a good receiver, so I galloped deep looking back over my shoulder, but I was not, in fact, all that terribly interested in actually fighting for possession of the ball. I was brought up to share, not to snatch things away from other people. Aggressiveness was not a prime value in my family.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | January 17, 2012
As listeners to the late, great Ron Smith know, the WBAL talk show host and Sun columnist used to introduce Gov. Martin O'Malley on air as Father O'Malley, with religious music running in the background. He was referring to Mr. O'Malley's tendency to frequent literary allusion and reverent tone whether discussing the death penalty or septic systems. If he were to write a religious manifesto, I offer this suggestion for the O'Malley Creed. I believe in one party, the Democrats, maker of all things in Maryland, and of all things visible and invisible, including those in public office who have been put on trial for corruption like former Prince George's County Executive Jack Johnson and State Senator Ulysses Currie and those whose deeds the party will never reveal.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
Donte' Stallworth rides with the philosophers of life in his quiet moments, but he runs with the cornerbacks for a living in the raucous world of the NFL. The Ravens veteran wide receiver is as conversant on Carl Jung or William Shakespeare as he is on Vontae Davis, Jason Allen or Sean Smith, the trio of Miami Dolphins' cornerbacks that he'll likely run up against Sunday in M&T Bank Stadium. The former psychology major at Tennessee has taken to tweeting inspirational messages from philosophers and famous authors, including Jung ("Your visions will become clear only when you can look into your own heart.
NEWS
By Jonah Penne | December 22, 2009
Christmas is almost here, and this year video games are again among the most popular gift items. They also spark the most controversy. Electronic entertainment, from Xbox to online multiplayer games, often features brutal and bloody violence. This understandably concerns parents and teachers. But this sort of entertainment also promises a kind of wild freedom that is comparable, in some ways, to what philosophers describe as a "state of nature." The state of nature, according to political philosophers, is a hypothetical world in which humans exist without laws, principles and central authority.
NEWS
December 14, 2009
STEPHEN E. TOULMIN, 87 Philosopher created argument model Stephen E. Toulmin, a British-born philosopher and retired University of Southern California professor who created a model for evaluating the practical arguments that arise from daily life, died Dec. 4 of pneumonia at a Los Angeles hospital The Oxford-trained theorist, who was the Henry R. Luce professor at the Center for Multiethnic and Transnational Studies at USC, was best...
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | November 1, 2007
Bright chill October days of sweet dry smells, smoke and apples and pigskin, memories of touch football games on grassy fields strewn with dry leaves. "You go deep," our QB said, thinking that a big, lanky kid like me must be a good receiver, so I galloped deep looking back over my shoulder, but I was not, in fact, all that terribly interested in actually fighting for possession of the ball. I was brought up to share, not to snatch things away from other people. Aggressiveness was not a prime value in my family.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | December 19, 2006
Mary Carman Rose, former chairwoman of Goucher College's philosophy department, died Dec. 12 at ManorCare Towson after suffering a fall earlier in the year. The Cedarcroft resident was 90. Born Mary Josephine Gassman in New York City, she lived through the Depression in a Minneapolis hotel - sharing a single room with a widowed aunt, Lulu Carman, who did cleaning in exchange for lodging. She later adopted her aunt's name. Dr. Rose planned to become an astronomer and earned a bachelor's degree at the University of Minnesota with a double major in astronomy and mathematics and a minor in physics.
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