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SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,[Sun reporter] | November 10, 2007
UMBC's shutdown defender this season came out of a physical education class once taught by Retrievers soccer coach Pete Caringi. It's an incongruity that still amazes - and amuses - the veteran coach. "Philippe was in my class, and he was a good player," the longtime UMBC coach said of Philippe Bissohong. "But it was a 0 percent chance that he'd be such an impact player at a Division I level." In the spring of 2006, when Bissohong walked on to Caringi's team, there was little about his game to suggest he would be a contributor for the Retrievers, much less one of the better defenders in America East.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | March 8, 2009
It wasn't apparent to anyone for the longest time that Baltimore author Philipp Meyer had hopped the freight train to success - just like the protagonist of his acclaimed debut novel, American Rust. Every time Meyer's line of boxcars seemed to be chugging along the straight and narrow, it would suddenly grind to a halt and shift into reverse. For starters, despite a stratospheric IQ, Meyer dropped out of City College at age 16. After three tries, he elbowed his way into prestigious Cornell University.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Staff Writer | July 29, 1994
"Foreign Student" could have been a sweet, little film about a period in this country's history at once more innocent and terrible than the current one. It collapses because of the inexperience of its foreign-born director, Eva Sereny, who neither sees Americans as real human beings nor understands the social context in which they lived almost 40 years ago.Menno Meyjes' screenplay is fashioned from Philippe Labro's autobiographical novel, "The Foreign Student," in which 18-year-old Frenchman Philippe LeClerc is invited to spend the fall semester as an exchange student at a tony college in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,[Sun reporter] | November 10, 2007
UMBC's shutdown defender this season came out of a physical education class once taught by Retrievers soccer coach Pete Caringi. It's an incongruity that still amazes - and amuses - the veteran coach. "Philippe was in my class, and he was a good player," the longtime UMBC coach said of Philippe Bissohong. "But it was a 0 percent chance that he'd be such an impact player at a Division I level." In the spring of 2006, when Bissohong walked on to Caringi's team, there was little about his game to suggest he would be a contributor for the Retrievers, much less one of the better defenders in America East.
SPORTS
February 19, 1996
BasketballKnicks: Acquired G Willie Anderson and C Victor Alexander from Raptors for C Herb Williams and G-F Doug Christie.CollegeMEAC: Named Coppin State F Reggie Welch men's basketball Player of the Week.FootballJaguars: Signed unrestricted free-agent T Leon Searcy to five-year contract.HockeyPenguins: Recalled G Philippe DeRouville from IHL Cleveland.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 2, 1996
Here's a nice hydrochloric aperitif for before dinner: Rene Clement's 1960 chiller "Purple Noon," rescued from oblivion by director/film scholar Martin Scorsese and re-released to American audiences by a new division of Miramax.The movie, opening today at the Charles, is derived from the 1955 American novel "The Talented Mr. Ripley," by suspensemistress Patricia Highsmith, a Jessica Fletcher with a nasty sense of humor. Highsmith's creation, played here with icy aplomb by Alain Delon, was one Tom Ripley, a handsome, charming, clever psychopath who maneuvers his way into the lives of the indolent rich, takes their money and sometimes their lives, and goes his merry way. That's exactly what the film chronicles.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | February 23, 1992
The Harford County Council voted, 5-0, with two members abstaining, to approve Cheryl H. Worthington as the county's new director of Community Services last week.The action was somewhat overshadowed by controversy over the forced resignation of Community Services Director Joan Traub Philippe in January. She had been in the post nine years.The resignation wasn't announced until nearly a week after it occurred, and only became known when County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmannappointed Worthington.
NEWS
By Harold Maass and Harold Maass,Contributing Writer | November 28, 1993
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- At Dr. Jeanne Philippe's psychiatric clinic, the patients flock in on any day when public transportation is running and the streets are safe.At a hotel across town, employees wonder each day whether they will be able to go home at quitting time, or whether heavy nightly shooting will force them to sleep where they work.Kids waited a month until street violence dropped off in November and schools opened.For two years Haiti's political crisis has disrupted life for everyone in the country, setting them on edge as the military fights an international push to return exiled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to power.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | June 6, 2004
BE ADVISED that a poker craze is sweeping the nation. Almost every night there are poker tournaments on television. And if you think that watching people play cards on television would be boring, I have three words for you: correct-o-mundo. The problem is that there's not a lot of action in televised poker, where the most strenuous thing the players do is push small plastic chips a distance of about 15 inches. (Granted, this is more action than you see in televised golf.) To make matters worse, poker players do not betray any feelings, so most of the time what you have, visually, is a bunch of grim-faced guys sitting around a table, looking like a hemorrhoid support group.
FEATURES
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 12, 1997
Jean-Michel Cousteau swept into the National Aquarium gala like he was Somebody. He wore a shimmering burgundy jacket and relayed tales of his flight from Fiji in a flowing French accent. Partygoers responded accordingly. They clustered around him and laughed with gusto at his every quip.Indeed, Jean-Michel Cousteau is Somebody -- an environmentalist, developer, writer, filmmaker. But most of all he is the son of a much bigger Somebody: Jacques-Yves Cousteau.The renowned underwater explorer and co-developer of the aqualung, who died this summer, cast a towering shadow in which Jean-Michel spent most of his life.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | June 6, 2004
BE ADVISED that a poker craze is sweeping the nation. Almost every night there are poker tournaments on television. And if you think that watching people play cards on television would be boring, I have three words for you: correct-o-mundo. The problem is that there's not a lot of action in televised poker, where the most strenuous thing the players do is push small plastic chips a distance of about 15 inches. (Granted, this is more action than you see in televised golf.) To make matters worse, poker players do not betray any feelings, so most of the time what you have, visually, is a bunch of grim-faced guys sitting around a table, looking like a hemorrhoid support group.
NEWS
By Michael Deibert and Tina Susman and Michael Deibert and Tina Susman,NEWSDAY | March 4, 2004
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Rebel leader Guy Philippe promised yesterday to disarm his forces after White House pressure to do so, and French troops and U.S. Marines began patrolling the streets of the Haitian capital in an effort to fill the security void in the city. With scores of armed thugs loyal to the ousted president, Jean-Bertrand Aristide, still on the loose, though, Haitians worried about renewed lawlessness. Prime Minister Yvon Neptune, whose residence was guarded by Marines in armored personnel carriers, announced a state of emergency, giving police and government officials wide powers of arrest and the right to ban public demonstrations.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 3, 2004
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - Vowing to bring order to this lawless capital, a leader of the rebels who forced former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to flee declared himself the nation's new military chief yesterday. Flanked by other rebel leaders and senior officers of Haiti's police force, Guy Philippe proclaimed at a news conference that he was in charge of the military, which had been disbanded by Aristide several years ago. "I am the chief," said Philippe, who then clarified that he meant "the military chief."
FEATURES
By Terril Yue Jones and Terril Yue Jones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 2001
Twenty-seven years ago, tens of thousands of people watched, shocked and transfixed, as Philippe Petit pulled off the performance of his lifetime. On Sept. 11, the man who walked a tightrope strung between New York's World Trade Center towers stood riveted by the same emotions and more, as he watched the twin towers crumble before his eyes. Petit, who through an ingenuous, clandestine and defiant act long ago helped New Yorkers embrace the stark, square skyscrapers that anchored Manhattan's skyline, immediately felt cut loose.
FEATURES
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 12, 1997
Jean-Michel Cousteau swept into the National Aquarium gala like he was Somebody. He wore a shimmering burgundy jacket and relayed tales of his flight from Fiji in a flowing French accent. Partygoers responded accordingly. They clustered around him and laughed with gusto at his every quip.Indeed, Jean-Michel Cousteau is Somebody -- an environmentalist, developer, writer, filmmaker. But most of all he is the son of a much bigger Somebody: Jacques-Yves Cousteau.The renowned underwater explorer and co-developer of the aqualung, who died this summer, cast a towering shadow in which Jean-Michel spent most of his life.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,NATIONAL STAFF | August 31, 1997
MIAMI BEACH -- Look up, beyond the 16th story, toward the electric blue sky and you see them: wings. This building has wings -- white concrete plumes jutting off the sides, making it look like some architectural version of Pegasus.That should come as no surprise. At the Delano, anything's possible. Hotels can be things with feathers, sofas stand 12 feet tall and music plays underwater in the Roman bath.This is hotel as myth, mirage. It's as un-Marriott as life gets. And it's perhaps South Beach's trendiest resort.
NEWS
By Michael Deibert and Tina Susman and Michael Deibert and Tina Susman,NEWSDAY | March 4, 2004
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Rebel leader Guy Philippe promised yesterday to disarm his forces after White House pressure to do so, and French troops and U.S. Marines began patrolling the streets of the Haitian capital in an effort to fill the security void in the city. With scores of armed thugs loyal to the ousted president, Jean-Bertrand Aristide, still on the loose, though, Haitians worried about renewed lawlessness. Prime Minister Yvon Neptune, whose residence was guarded by Marines in armored personnel carriers, announced a state of emergency, giving police and government officials wide powers of arrest and the right to ban public demonstrations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | March 8, 2009
It wasn't apparent to anyone for the longest time that Baltimore author Philipp Meyer had hopped the freight train to success - just like the protagonist of his acclaimed debut novel, American Rust. Every time Meyer's line of boxcars seemed to be chugging along the straight and narrow, it would suddenly grind to a halt and shift into reverse. For starters, despite a stratospheric IQ, Meyer dropped out of City College at age 16. After three tries, he elbowed his way into prestigious Cornell University.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 2, 1996
Here's a nice hydrochloric aperitif for before dinner: Rene Clement's 1960 chiller "Purple Noon," rescued from oblivion by director/film scholar Martin Scorsese and re-released to American audiences by a new division of Miramax.The movie, opening today at the Charles, is derived from the 1955 American novel "The Talented Mr. Ripley," by suspensemistress Patricia Highsmith, a Jessica Fletcher with a nasty sense of humor. Highsmith's creation, played here with icy aplomb by Alain Delon, was one Tom Ripley, a handsome, charming, clever psychopath who maneuvers his way into the lives of the indolent rich, takes their money and sometimes their lives, and goes his merry way. That's exactly what the film chronicles.
SPORTS
February 19, 1996
BasketballKnicks: Acquired G Willie Anderson and C Victor Alexander from Raptors for C Herb Williams and G-F Doug Christie.CollegeMEAC: Named Coppin State F Reggie Welch men's basketball Player of the Week.FootballJaguars: Signed unrestricted free-agent T Leon Searcy to five-year contract.HockeyPenguins: Recalled G Philippe DeRouville from IHL Cleveland.
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