Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPhilip Seymour Hoffman
IN THE NEWS

Philip Seymour Hoffman

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | February 4, 2014
Normally, I get neither sad nor particularly sentimental when celebrities die. But I'm really bent out of shape about Philip Seymour Hoffman's death Sunday from an apparent heroin overdose. According to friends, Mr. Hoffman had been living drug-free for more than two decades until recently relapsing. His death is a reminder that even a demon suppressed for a long time is never fully exorcised and may, at some point, burst forth with an arresting potency - an apt description, as it were, of so many of Mr. Hoffman's most memorable on-screen performances.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 11, 2014
One day in February 2000, I sat in a police car on Poplar Grove Street in West Baltimore to observe a reverse sting: Instead of attempting to buy heroin from dealers, undercover officers were offering to sell it to users. They cleared out the regular salesmen, took over their corners and waited for the customers to arrive. The police arrested 53 people that day, including the daughter of a prominent contractor and a fellow who lived in an upscale city neighborhood. Almost all of the other heroin addicts had driven in from the suburbs - from Cockeysville, Gaithersburg, Essex, Woodlawn, Marriottsville, Crownsville, Jessup, Ellicott City, Linthicum and Columbia.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By William Georgiades | November 9, 2007
Philip Seymour Hoffman looks more like the rumpled New York theater director that he is than the Oscar-winning star he's been playing for the last year and a half. He's dressed in dark, nondescript clothes, his red hair is wild, his face is unshaven, and those eyes that modulate so precisely from role to role are clear. You wouldn't know he was famous at all, were it not for the fact that he's in a midtown hotel room decorated with posters from his new film, or that an assistant sits down a few feet away after fetching him a pack of Camel Lights.
NEWS
February 10, 2014
It is most difficult to come to terms with the passing of Philip Seymour Hoffman ( "A fatal addiction," Feb. 3). Mr. Hoffman was one of our miracles. All those who admired him were enriched by his prodigious talent, and his tragic death is a great loss to American art and culture. In his instructions to the actors, Hamlet tells them " to hold, as 'twere, the mirror up to nature. " No one in our time did that better than Philip Seymour Hoffman. His death brings to mind the final lines of Stephen Spender's poem "I Think Continually of Those Who Were Truly Great:" Born of the sun they traveled a short while towards the sun/ And left the vivid air signed with their honor.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 6, 2006
Hollywood -- Philip Seymour Hoffman was named best actor last night at the 78th annual Academy Awards for his performance as Truman Capote in the film Capote. Otherwise, films with clear political messages dominated the early stages of last night's Academy Awards, as George Clooney and Rachel Weisz won supporting actor and actress Oscars for movies that questioned America's Mideast policy and the world's treatment of medical crises in Africa. In the evening's first award, Clooney won for playing a burned-out, overweight CIA agent in Syriana.
HEALTH
Dan Rodricks | February 4, 2014
If confirming evidence of the ruinous power of opiate addiction was needed, we now have the wasted life of the genius actor Philip Seymour Hoffman - George Willis Jr. in "Scent of a Woman," Phil Parma in "Magnolia," Art Howe in "Moneyball," and a superb Willy Loman in "Death of a Salesman" on Broadway less than two years ago. Hoffman was accomplished and respected, hailed as the greatest actor of his generation, and he presumably had wealth....
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 4, 2006
In between its gut-crunching set pieces, Mission: Impossible III offers a terrible argument for staying in shape. Just by bringing a weary weightiness to the screen, Ving Rhames as the most uncomplicated good guy, Philip Seymour Hoffman as the most uncomplicated bad guy, and Laurence Fishburne as the most unlikable authority figure in the Impossible Mission Force steal scenes from their athletic star. They don't look as if they could eat Tom Cruise for lunch. They look as if they already have.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | December 25, 2007
Reality wounds but also heals in The Savages, writer-director Tamara Jenkins' cuttingly funny-sad family drama about a college-teacher brother, Jon Savage (Philip Seymour Hoffman), his unproduced playwright sister, Wendy (Laura Linney), and their father, Lenny (Philip Bosco), who has lapsed into Parkinson's dementia. Samuel Johnson said, "When a man knows he is to be hanged in a fortnight, it concentrates his mind wonderfully." One tragedy of dementia is that it scatters its victims' focus.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 21, 2007
When it's really bubbling, Charlie Wilson's War brings Broadway fizz to D.C., Houston and Cairo cocktail parties. It keeps you curious and amused for 97 minutes. But like many a cocktail party, it has an upside and a downside. It might refresh you after ponderous events or "event films" - but still leave you longing for more long-lasting experiences. It stars Tom Hanks, almost back to loose, wisecracking form, as a sybaritic East Texas congressman who uses his connections and committee positions to wangle funding for the Afghan rebels during the Soviet invasion.
NEWS
February 10, 2014
It is most difficult to come to terms with the passing of Philip Seymour Hoffman ( "A fatal addiction," Feb. 3). Mr. Hoffman was one of our miracles. All those who admired him were enriched by his prodigious talent, and his tragic death is a great loss to American art and culture. In his instructions to the actors, Hamlet tells them " to hold, as 'twere, the mirror up to nature. " No one in our time did that better than Philip Seymour Hoffman. His death brings to mind the final lines of Stephen Spender's poem "I Think Continually of Those Who Were Truly Great:" Born of the sun they traveled a short while towards the sun/ And left the vivid air signed with their honor.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | February 4, 2014
Normally, I get neither sad nor particularly sentimental when celebrities die. But I'm really bent out of shape about Philip Seymour Hoffman's death Sunday from an apparent heroin overdose. According to friends, Mr. Hoffman had been living drug-free for more than two decades until recently relapsing. His death is a reminder that even a demon suppressed for a long time is never fully exorcised and may, at some point, burst forth with an arresting potency - an apt description, as it were, of so many of Mr. Hoffman's most memorable on-screen performances.
HEALTH
Dan Rodricks | February 4, 2014
If confirming evidence of the ruinous power of opiate addiction was needed, we now have the wasted life of the genius actor Philip Seymour Hoffman - George Willis Jr. in "Scent of a Woman," Phil Parma in "Magnolia," Art Howe in "Moneyball," and a superb Willy Loman in "Death of a Salesman" on Broadway less than two years ago. Hoffman was accomplished and respected, hailed as the greatest actor of his generation, and he presumably had wealth....
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN REPORTER | January 30, 2008
If you're like us - which you're probably not; you're probably smarter and better looking and make more money, but on the off chance you are like us - then there are only a few televised events that can bring gender harmony to your living room sofa. Because American Idol makes us want to stick a sharp object in our temples, our list is short: the Super Bowl and the Academy Awards. We consistently marvel at the way these productions bring together husbands and wives, boyfriends and girlfriends, lovers and friends, for hours of bloated, overhyped, fascinating television programming.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | December 25, 2007
Reality wounds but also heals in The Savages, writer-director Tamara Jenkins' cuttingly funny-sad family drama about a college-teacher brother, Jon Savage (Philip Seymour Hoffman), his unproduced playwright sister, Wendy (Laura Linney), and their father, Lenny (Philip Bosco), who has lapsed into Parkinson's dementia. Samuel Johnson said, "When a man knows he is to be hanged in a fortnight, it concentrates his mind wonderfully." One tragedy of dementia is that it scatters its victims' focus.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 21, 2007
When it's really bubbling, Charlie Wilson's War brings Broadway fizz to D.C., Houston and Cairo cocktail parties. It keeps you curious and amused for 97 minutes. But like many a cocktail party, it has an upside and a downside. It might refresh you after ponderous events or "event films" - but still leave you longing for more long-lasting experiences. It stars Tom Hanks, almost back to loose, wisecracking form, as a sybaritic East Texas congressman who uses his connections and committee positions to wangle funding for the Afghan rebels during the Soviet invasion.
FEATURES
By William Georgiades | November 9, 2007
Philip Seymour Hoffman looks more like the rumpled New York theater director that he is than the Oscar-winning star he's been playing for the last year and a half. He's dressed in dark, nondescript clothes, his red hair is wild, his face is unshaven, and those eyes that modulate so precisely from role to role are clear. You wouldn't know he was famous at all, were it not for the fact that he's in a midtown hotel room decorated with posters from his new film, or that an assistant sits down a few feet away after fetching him a pack of Camel Lights.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 3, 2003
Philip Seymour Hoffman paints a fascinating, and perhaps unique, portrait of addiction in Owning Mahowny. Based on a true incident, Mahowny tells the story of a Toronto assistant bank manager whose real full-time job is gambling addict. And the real magic of Hoffman's performance is that he refuses to make Mahowny anything special, or use histrionics to show the depths of his addiction. This may be the quietest addict ever to hit movie screens, as well the most disturbing. We get no background on Mahowny; screenwriter Maurice Chauvet's script is concerned only with the here and now. This is not a portrait of addiction, but rather a snapshot - a few moments in the life of a man who's given over control of his life to a game of chance, and doesn't even realize he's shortchanging himself.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 4, 2006
In between its gut-crunching set pieces, Mission: Impossible III offers a terrible argument for staying in shape. Just by bringing a weary weightiness to the screen, Ving Rhames as the most uncomplicated good guy, Philip Seymour Hoffman as the most uncomplicated bad guy, and Laurence Fishburne as the most unlikable authority figure in the Impossible Mission Force steal scenes from their athletic star. They don't look as if they could eat Tom Cruise for lunch. They look as if they already have.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.