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By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1997
Long before he was the grandfather of civil rights, A. Philip Randolph was "the most dangerous Negro in America."In 1917, the Cleveland, Ohio, authorities threw him in jail for speaking against prejudice, then released him when he promised to get out of town. His union work cost him more than a few jobs, but he never stopped, and in the end he helped change America."A. Philip Randolph, 1889-1979" begins a six-week run today at the B & O Railroad Museum. It traces Randolph's life as union leader, civil rights activist and crusader for justice.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 28, 2013
Amid the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, one complaint became almost a refrain: What about economic justice? After all, the official title of the event was the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The line "I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will be judged not by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character" resides in the rhetorical pantheon with "Four score and seven years ago" and "We the People of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | October 9, 1997
Race carsZooming into Harford County Sunday will be the annual Race Car Extravaganza. With their vintage cars, dirt-track race cars, drag cars, mud-hop trucks, custom street rods, go-carts and boats, drivers will show off their machines and discuss their expertise. Don't miss the STA-BIL East Coast Regional Race for Riding Lawn Mowers, paced by the jet-powered Dixie Chopper, previously seen on "Home Improvement." A benefit auction of mostly racing memorabilia will be offered, and NASCAR racing collectibles, commemorative event shirts and refreshments will be available.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally | August 28, 2003
Forty years ago today, more than 225,000 people joined the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. gave the "I Have a Dream" speech that would from that time on evoke the aspirations of those civil rights protesters. The march was inspired by A. Philip Randolph, president of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters and vice president of the AFL-CIO, who had first advocated such a march in 1941. He called that one off after President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued an executive order prohibiting discrimination in hiring for defense plants.
NEWS
January 12, 2001
Three events in Carroll County will celebrate the life of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. The Former Students and Friends of Robert Moton School will hold its 14th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. tomorrow at Martin's Westminster in 140 Village Shopping Center. The Rev. Mitchell O. Thomas from Payne Memorial African Methodist Episcopal Church in Baltimore will speak, and the Morgan State University choir will sing. The Rev. Dr. Howard W. Hinson, pastor of Union Street United Methodist Church, will give the blessing and benediction.
NEWS
January 11, 2001
Three events in Carroll County will celebrate the life of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. The Former Students and Friends of Robert Moton School will hold its 14th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Saturday at Martin's Westminster in 140 Village Shopping Center. The Rev. Mitchell O. Thomas from Payne Memorial African Methodist Episcopal Church in Baltimore will speak, and the Morgan State University choir will sing. The Rev. Dr. Howard W. Hinson, pastor of Union Street United Methodist Church, will give the blessing and benediction.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally | August 28, 2003
Forty years ago today, more than 225,000 people joined the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. gave the "I Have a Dream" speech that would from that time on evoke the aspirations of those civil rights protesters. The march was inspired by A. Philip Randolph, president of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters and vice president of the AFL-CIO, who had first advocated such a march in 1941. He called that one off after President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued an executive order prohibiting discrimination in hiring for defense plants.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 28, 2013
Amid the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, one complaint became almost a refrain: What about economic justice? After all, the official title of the event was the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The line "I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will be judged not by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character" resides in the rhetorical pantheon with "Four score and seven years ago" and "We the People of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | August 9, 1998
PRESIDENT Clinton said last month on the 50th anniversary of Harry Truman's issuance of an executive order calling for equal treatment for blacks in the armed services that it was "one of the best decisions any commander in chief ever made."Best political decision, certainly. It got him re-elected.The postwar services were almost entirely segregated by unit and by job. Civil rights leaders demanded a change. A. Philip Randolph, head of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, was insistent in pressing for equal opportunity in enlistments, schooling, promotions, assignments and retention -- and especially in integrating units.
NEWS
September 1, 2012
As a nonviolent activist, I was really disappointed to see the op-ed by Clayola Brown ("Sequestration would destroy U.S. economy," Aug. 27). What astonished me is that it was written by the president of the A. Philip Randolph Institute. Surely, all progressive activists greatly respect the work of A. Philip Randolph, a legendary organizer and activist. However, the current president of his institute wrote this: "Sequestration cuts in the defense budget would be especially devastating to the economy because of the aerospace sector's importance to local economies across America.
NEWS
January 12, 2001
Three events in Carroll County will celebrate the life of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. The Former Students and Friends of Robert Moton School will hold its 14th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. tomorrow at Martin's Westminster in 140 Village Shopping Center. The Rev. Mitchell O. Thomas from Payne Memorial African Methodist Episcopal Church in Baltimore will speak, and the Morgan State University choir will sing. The Rev. Dr. Howard W. Hinson, pastor of Union Street United Methodist Church, will give the blessing and benediction.
NEWS
January 11, 2001
Three events in Carroll County will celebrate the life of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. The Former Students and Friends of Robert Moton School will hold its 14th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Saturday at Martin's Westminster in 140 Village Shopping Center. The Rev. Mitchell O. Thomas from Payne Memorial African Methodist Episcopal Church in Baltimore will speak, and the Morgan State University choir will sing. The Rev. Dr. Howard W. Hinson, pastor of Union Street United Methodist Church, will give the blessing and benediction.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1997
Long before he was the grandfather of civil rights, A. Philip Randolph was "the most dangerous Negro in America."In 1917, the Cleveland, Ohio, authorities threw him in jail for speaking against prejudice, then released him when he promised to get out of town. His union work cost him more than a few jobs, but he never stopped, and in the end he helped change America."A. Philip Randolph, 1889-1979" begins a six-week run today at the B & O Railroad Museum. It traces Randolph's life as union leader, civil rights activist and crusader for justice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | October 9, 1997
Race carsZooming into Harford County Sunday will be the annual Race Car Extravaganza. With their vintage cars, dirt-track race cars, drag cars, mud-hop trucks, custom street rods, go-carts and boats, drivers will show off their machines and discuss their expertise. Don't miss the STA-BIL East Coast Regional Race for Riding Lawn Mowers, paced by the jet-powered Dixie Chopper, previously seen on "Home Improvement." A benefit auction of mostly racing memorabilia will be offered, and NASCAR racing collectibles, commemorative event shirts and refreshments will be available.
NEWS
January 18, 2004
McDaniel College will celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day with a film and lecture tomorrow. The film, Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin, will be shown at 3 p.m. in Lewis Recitation Hall's Decker Auditorium. One of the first "freedom riders," Rustin was an adviser to King and A. Philip Randolph, organizer of the 1963 March on Washington, but was denied his place in the limelight because he was openly gay. Human relations expert Jaiya John, founder and executive director of Soul Water Rising, an educational mission devoted to improving human relations, combating prejudice and fostering spiritual growth, will speak at 7 p.m. in Alumni Hall.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
The momentous events that culminated in the March on Washington 50 years ago this week have largely overlooked the legacy of one man whose own dream of such a march was more than two decades in the making. Asa Philip Randolph — better known as A. Philip Randolph — went from being described as "the most dangerous Negro in America" for his work organizing the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters to being recognized as the grandfather of civil rights. "No other living American has done more to seek justice for all the poor, the working classes, the minorities in our society and around the world than has A. Philip Randolph," said civil rights leader Bayard Rustin, who was a protege of Randolph's and did much of the planning for the 1963 March on Washington.
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