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NEWS
By Derrick Jackson | November 4, 1999
STEP right up, ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls! Click on to www.philipmorris.com and see death-defying feats of corporate communications! See the Marlboro man eat fire! See Virginia Slims dangle from the Trapeze of Truth! See Benson stop Hedging! Witness what no man, woman, or child has ever seen under the big top of Big Tobacco! See our Web page, where we tell you how you are killing yourselves with our cigarettes! Philip Morris is playing us all for Bozos. The cigarette-maker has unveiled a new Web page that, after decades of denials and lies, admits that the company's product might cause a few problems for consumers, like, um, cancer.
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NEWS
By Michael Siegel | June 9, 2009
The U.S. Senate may vote as early as Tuesday on legislation that would, for the first time, give the Food and Drug Administration regulatory authority over tobacco products. Numerous anti-smoking and health groups support the legislation. So does this mean Congress is finally on the verge of stepping up to take on Big Tobacco? Hardly. The bill in question was crafted, in part, by the nation's leading cigarette company, Philip Morris, as part of a deal worked out between the tobacco giant and an anti-smoking group - the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 9, 2003
EDWARDSVILLE, Ill. - Philip Morris USA, the largest U.S. cigarette maker, may not have to post a $12 billion bond to appeal a $10.1 billion damage verdict, an Illinois judge said. The Altria Group Inc. unit may have other options, including a "guarantee" from its parent, Illinois Circuit Judge Nicholas Byron told a court hearing yesterday. "I want to see this company appeal," he said. "I don't want to put the company out of business." In a related ruling, Cook County Circuit Judge James Henry in Chicago blocked Illinois for 10 days from collecting the $3 billion punitive-damage portion of Byron's judgment.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | March 25, 2009
Leaders in both houses of the General Assembly are backing a tax change on a product known as moist snuff that is being pushed by tobacco giant Philip Morris - and opposed by an unusual coalition of other tobacco interests and health advocates. Lobbyist Bruce Bereano, representing the Maryland Association of Tobacco & Candy Distributors, grinned Tuesday at finding himself on the same side as the American Cancer Society. "In the 36 years I've been lobbying for the tobacco industry, this is a first," Bereano said.
NEWS
By MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | June 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court unanimously rejected a tobacco industry legal tactic, ruling yesterday that Philip Morris cannot shift a lawsuit from state to federal court. Simply following rules and regulations does not make a company a federal officer with a right to have cases heard in federal court, the justices ruled. The ruling undercuts embattled tobacco companies, which have hoped to escape the state courts, where they've suffered multibillion-dollar losses. "The upshot is that a highly regulated firm cannot find a statutory basis for removal [to federal court]
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 26, 2000
In a transaction that will create the world's most profitable food company, Philip Morris, the parent of Kraft Foods, announced yesterday that it would buy Nabisco Holdings, the food company that makes and markets Oreo cookies, Ritz Crackers, and other classic packaged foods, for $14.9 billion. In addition, Nabisco Group Holdings, the parent of Nabisco Holdings, said that once it completes the sale of its food business to Philip Morris, it has agreed to be acquired by the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. for $9.8 billion.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 19, 2003
NEW YORK -Standard & Poor's cut the credit ratings yesterday on $18 billion in municipal bonds backed by payments cigarette makers owe the states, blaming weakening industry conditions. The ratings reductions, which apply to debt maturing after April 15, 2004, come as cigarette makers encounter an "adverse litigation environment and expectations for additional state excise tax increases," Standard & Poor's said. Also contributing to the ratings downgrades was a report by Philip Morris USA that cigarette shipments fell by 16 percent in the first quarter.
BUSINESS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 29, 2005
Altria Group Inc. edged closer yesterday to a possible breakup that would give renewed independence to Northfield, Ill.-based Kraft Foods Inc. The New York City-based conglomerate owns 85 percent of Kraft. While declining to provide a timetable, Louis C. Camilleri, Altria's chairman and chief executive, reaffirmed at the company's annual shareholders meeting that Altria plans to split into two or three companies if the "litigation environment" continues to improve. In Altria's annual report, Camilleri said, "We are preparing for a separation at the appropriate time."
NEWS
December 2, 1998
Johnny Roventini, 88, the pint-sized bellboy who became one of the best-known figures in U.S. advertising by shouting, "Call for Philip Morris," has died.Mr. Roventini died Monday at a hospital in Suffern, N.Y., said a nephew. The cause of death had not been determined.In 1933, Mr. Roventini was 22 and being promoted by the New Yorker Hotel as "the smallest bellboy in the world" when he met advertising man Milton Biow, who had an idea for a cigarette ad. Biow gave him a dollar "to locate Philip Morris."
NEWS
By NORRIS WEST | November 26, 2000
IS BIG TOBACCO this sneaky? Could a tobacco company move into the hearts, pocketbooks and lungs of potential consumers in such subliminal fashion that you don't even see its name? Like a Muhammad Ali right that many an opponent never saw coming? Like smoke, if not mirrors? Absolutely. Although foreign sales of tobacco products are growing, manufacturers have hardly given up on U.S. consumers, in spite of the multibillion-dollar legal settlement with states. So tobacco companies have a financial incentive to craft a positive image.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | April 26, 2008
Philip K. Morris, a retired commercial photographer who worked in space exploration in the 1960s, died of congestive heart failure Tuesday at College Manor in Lutherville. The former Rodgers Forge resident was 93. Born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton, he attended St. Dominic's Parochial School. He dropped out of high school to help support his family during the Depression. He wanted an education and took evening vocational classes offered by city public schools in 1937. He joined his father and brothers at the Glenn L. Martin aircraft plant in Middle River.
NEWS
By MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | June 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court unanimously rejected a tobacco industry legal tactic, ruling yesterday that Philip Morris cannot shift a lawsuit from state to federal court. Simply following rules and regulations does not make a company a federal officer with a right to have cases heard in federal court, the justices ruled. The ruling undercuts embattled tobacco companies, which have hoped to escape the state courts, where they've suffered multibillion-dollar losses. "The upshot is that a highly regulated firm cannot find a statutory basis for removal [to federal court]
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 21, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court handed Big Tobacco a victory yesterday in overturning a $79.5 million award to a smoker's widow, but declined to rule whether such punitive-damage awards are excessive. Although the Altria Group Inc.'s Philip Morris USA may have won an important battle in the effort of corporations to cut down big jury awards, the outcome of the larger legal conflict remains to be decided. In its 5-4 decision, the high court tightened legal standards that will guide future punitive-damage cases.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY and ANDREW LECKEY,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 6, 2006
For most industries, it would seem to be a very bad time. In the high-profile film Thank You for Smoking, a Big Tobacco spokesman is depicted as a sleazy fellow running a public-relations effort to spin away the dangers of cigarettes. Some health organizations are now pledging to hold meetings only in cities with "smoke-free air" laws. That follows a recent U.S. surgeon general's report that nearly 50,000 Americans die annually from secondhand smoke. U.S. cigarette consumption continues its decline from a high of 50 percent of the adult population in the 1950s to 20 percent today, a slide expected to continue.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY | August 14, 2005
Q. Several mutual funds that I own hold shares of Altria Group Inc. Any guess as to what its future holds? B.R., via the Internet A. Here's why mutual funds own tobacco company shares despite health issues, related lawsuits and the gradual decline in the percentage of Americans who smoke: Cigarettes are cheap to make, brand-loyal smokers accept price increases, and the firms generate tons of cash. The stock of Altria (MO) is up 10 percent this year after gains of 18 percent last year and 43 percent in 2003.
BUSINESS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 29, 2005
Altria Group Inc. edged closer yesterday to a possible breakup that would give renewed independence to Northfield, Ill.-based Kraft Foods Inc. The New York City-based conglomerate owns 85 percent of Kraft. While declining to provide a timetable, Louis C. Camilleri, Altria's chairman and chief executive, reaffirmed at the company's annual shareholders meeting that Altria plans to split into two or three companies if the "litigation environment" continues to improve. In Altria's annual report, Camilleri said, "We are preparing for a separation at the appropriate time."
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | March 25, 2009
Leaders in both houses of the General Assembly are backing a tax change on a product known as moist snuff that is being pushed by tobacco giant Philip Morris - and opposed by an unusual coalition of other tobacco interests and health advocates. Lobbyist Bruce Bereano, representing the Maryland Association of Tobacco & Candy Distributors, grinned Tuesday at finding himself on the same side as the American Cancer Society. "In the 36 years I've been lobbying for the tobacco industry, this is a first," Bereano said.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2000
Amid the upbeat television coverage of gold-medal swimmers and gymnasts, the advertisement seems grim, almost shocking: young people piling 1,200 body bags outside a tobacco giant's Manhattan headquarters to demonstrate the daily death toll of smoking in America. A young man with a bullhorn shouts up to gray-suited executives who peer warily from their windows several stories above. "We're gonna leave these here," he says, "so you can see what 1,200 people actually look like!" The edgy anti-smoking ad airing on NBC during the Olympics is most Americans' first encounter with the work of the American Legacy Foundation, which will get $1.5 billion over the next five years from the national tobacco settlement to persuade teen-agers not to smoke.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2005
FOR nearly 370 years, tobacco has been more than a crop in Southern Maryland. It has been a way of life. The first European settlers to the region saw the potential of the crop shortly after their ships -- the Ark and the Dove -- landed at St. Clements Island in 1634. They developed a thriving economy around supplying the Old Country's growing demand for smokes. Tobacco was used as currency. The town preacher was paid in tobacco. Tobacco farmers could order a bride from England for 120 pounds of the dried leaf.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY | February 15, 2004
What's the outlook for Altria Group? I bought the stock in 1999 and it's done quite well since then. But I'm worried that it might be risky. I'm 49 years old and this holding represents one-eighth of my portfolio. - B.R., via the Internet The company formerly known as Philip Morris Cos. has lately received boosts from favorable currency translation resulting from the weaker dollar and increased domestic tobacco sales. An 18 percent increase in fourth-quarter profits was posted by this maker of dominant cigarette brands such as Marlboro, Merit and L&M. Altria, the world's largest cigarette maker, has been taking market share from No. 2 R.J. Reynolds Holdings.
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