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By Geraldine Segal | October 13, 1992
PHILIP Glass arrives at the Metropolitan Opera this week -- a long way from Baltimore and Howard streets, where his father owned record stores in the 1950s, and a shorter way from the Manhattan taxi he used to drive to make ends meet. To commemorae the 500th anniversary of Columbus' arrival in the New World, the Metropolitan commissioned Mr. Glass to write a special opera. The work, " The Voyage," has its premiere this week in New York. It is about "the idea of exploration and discovery," according to the composer, who was born in Baltimore in 1937.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2012
With a giant flag of 15 stars and stripes as a backdrop inside Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, a celebratory concert Sunday night drew a packed house to cap the weekend's commemoration of the War of 1812 bicentennial. As if to underline that there are no hard feelings left over from that conflict between the Americans and the British, members of the Royal Marine Band were positioned outside the hall to entertain arriving concertgoers. Inside, this Star-Spangled Sailabration event featured the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, the United States Navy Band Sea Chanters Chorus and Gov.Martin O'Malley's Celtic band, O'Malley's March.
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FEATURES
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 21, 2003
Time was when the words "Philip Glass" and "mainstream" could be mentioned in the same breath only if you were joking. Not anymore. This year, the Baltimore-born composer was nominated for an Oscar and Golden Globe for his film score to The Hours; it won the British equivalent of the Academy Award. Not the sort of career development predicted for this longtime champion of the musical style known, for want of a better term, as minimalism. When Glass gives a solo piano recital Saturday at the Columbia Festival of the Arts, chances are the audience will include people who have grown up with his musical idiom in their ears, who can instantly spot its imitators on TV commercials and rock songs (like Coldplay's recent hit "Clocks")
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
The most famous piece of music about a conflict in 1812 has nothing to do with what is dubbed the second war of American independence. That won't stop Tchaikovsky's "1812 Overture," with its famous bells and cannons, from being part of the "Star-Spangled Symphony" concert June 17 as part of the events in Baltimore commemorating the War of 1812 bicentennial. But Tchaikovsky's depiction of Russian and French armies colliding at the Battle of Borodino will have an American companion piece on this Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 15, 2006
A multimedia event with music by Philip Glass, a huge work for amplified violin and orchestra by John Adams, a concerto for tap dance by Michael Torke and the world premiere of a piece by Richard Danielpour -- not the usual lineup for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. And those are just a few of the notable components in the 2006-2007 season, which was announced yesterday. The increased spotlight on contemporary music highlights one of the major characteristics that will mark Marin Alsop's tenure as the BSO's music director, the first woman to hold such a post with a major American orchestra.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 14, 2001
NEW YORK - There's an old line about Vivaldi, that he didn't write 500 concertos, but one concerto 500 times. Some folks aim a similar zinger at Philip Glass, a leader of minimalism whose manner of repeating melodic and rhythmic patterns has made him one of the most instantly recognizable composers of our time. But there's something admirable about the man's steadfastness, his devotion to a particular style and particular issues. Twenty-five years ago, at the Metropolitan Opera, Glass and director/designer Robert Wilson collaborated on one of the landmarks of minimalism, Einstein on the Beach, a visually provocative, non-narrative opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lauren Rosenblum | June 12, 2003
Philip Glass will be at the Columbia Festival of Arts on June 21 for his first Maryland appearance in more than 10 years. Glass, a Baltimore native, studied music at the Peabody Institute. He has been an international composer and keyboard player for the past 40 years. Glass received an Oscar nomination for his composition of classical music that haunted viewers in The Hours. He has composed music for theater, opera, film and dance. "I am a theater composer more than anything else," Glass said in a recent interview.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 4, 1990
Philip Glass is more difficult to track down than a Washington politician."I think this is Washington," Mr. Glass said with a chuckle in a recent phone conversation from the Days Inn where he was staying in the nation's capital. "If it's Monday, it must be Washington. Believe me, these days I'm never sure."The 53-year-old American composer -- who was born in Baltimore -- is on tour with his Philip Glass Ensemble, performing his score for "Koyaanisqatsi," Godfrey Reggio's 1983 film about ecological balance, at showings of the film.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 25, 1996
In "Words, Words, Words," one of the hilarious sketches in David Ives' "All in the Timing," a trio of monkeys pound away at typewriters trying to prove the theory that: "Three monkeys typing into infinity will sooner or later produce 'Hamlet.' "But whatever the "inadvertent virtues of randomness," as one monkey puts it, there's nothing random about the craftsmanship of this clever anthology of six one-act plays, or about the performances at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, where this off-Broadway hit is receiving a sparkling Baltimore premiere under Timothy Crawford's direction.
NEWS
July 19, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS Summer meditations Been thinking - about poker, a hungry rabbit, a proposed city sports arena, Hairspray, the Gebco girls and an anti-crime campaign. Maryland baltimoresun.com/rodricks The goods on Vick NFL commissioner Roger Goodell already has enough before him to justify an indefinite suspension for Michael Vick. Sports baltimoresun.com/schmuck OTHER VOICES David Steele on Vick's missed chances -- Sports Rashod D. Ollison on Artscape's music lineup -- Live!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2011
Children have defied their parents since children first appeared on the planet. Sometimes, kids do what they're told not to do just because … well, because they were told not to do it. Other times, curiosity and a little touch of hubris simply get the better of them. So it was for Icarus. You remember Icarus — his father was Daedalus, who, in Greek myth, fashioned wings out of feathers glued down with wax. Daedalus tells Icarus not to fly too close to the sun, but Icarus can't resist the temptation and, as the wax melts, crashes to his death in the sea. Brian Greene, the Columbia University physicist whose popular books have helped take the intimidation out of science for many readers, never felt entirely comfortable with that story.
NEWS
July 19, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS Summer meditations Been thinking - about poker, a hungry rabbit, a proposed city sports arena, Hairspray, the Gebco girls and an anti-crime campaign. Maryland baltimoresun.com/rodricks The goods on Vick NFL commissioner Roger Goodell already has enough before him to justify an indefinite suspension for Michael Vick. Sports baltimoresun.com/schmuck OTHER VOICES David Steele on Vick's missed chances -- Sports Rashod D. Ollison on Artscape's music lineup -- Live!
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 15, 2006
A multimedia event with music by Philip Glass, a huge work for amplified violin and orchestra by John Adams, a concerto for tap dance by Michael Torke and the world premiere of a piece by Richard Danielpour -- not the usual lineup for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. And those are just a few of the notable components in the 2006-2007 season, which was announced yesterday. The increased spotlight on contemporary music highlights one of the major characteristics that will mark Marin Alsop's tenure as the BSO's music director, the first woman to hold such a post with a major American orchestra.
FEATURES
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 21, 2003
Time was when the words "Philip Glass" and "mainstream" could be mentioned in the same breath only if you were joking. Not anymore. This year, the Baltimore-born composer was nominated for an Oscar and Golden Globe for his film score to The Hours; it won the British equivalent of the Academy Award. Not the sort of career development predicted for this longtime champion of the musical style known, for want of a better term, as minimalism. When Glass gives a solo piano recital Saturday at the Columbia Festival of the Arts, chances are the audience will include people who have grown up with his musical idiom in their ears, who can instantly spot its imitators on TV commercials and rock songs (like Coldplay's recent hit "Clocks")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lauren Rosenblum | June 12, 2003
Philip Glass will be at the Columbia Festival of Arts on June 21 for his first Maryland appearance in more than 10 years. Glass, a Baltimore native, studied music at the Peabody Institute. He has been an international composer and keyboard player for the past 40 years. Glass received an Oscar nomination for his composition of classical music that haunted viewers in The Hours. He has composed music for theater, opera, film and dance. "I am a theater composer more than anything else," Glass said in a recent interview.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 14, 2001
NEW YORK - There's an old line about Vivaldi, that he didn't write 500 concertos, but one concerto 500 times. Some folks aim a similar zinger at Philip Glass, a leader of minimalism whose manner of repeating melodic and rhythmic patterns has made him one of the most instantly recognizable composers of our time. But there's something admirable about the man's steadfastness, his devotion to a particular style and particular issues. Twenty-five years ago, at the Metropolitan Opera, Glass and director/designer Robert Wilson collaborated on one of the landmarks of minimalism, Einstein on the Beach, a visually provocative, non-narrative opera.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 28, 1995
Because of inaccurate information supplied by the theater company, the wrong composer was named in Saturday's edition for Mother Lode Productions' "The Mysteries and What's So Funny?" at the Theatre Project. The music, based on themes from Philip Glass' original score, was composed by David Rona, musical director, and Jon Perry, co-writer and arranger.The Sun regrets the errors."My life has been my art -- my art, my life," the actor playing Marcel Duchamp says in "The Mysteries and What's So Funny?"
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 19, 2001
Oscar Wilde observed that the English and the Americans have everything in common except the language. He might also have excepted the music. Folks on these shores have never been wildly fond of most British composers. Other than graduation day, audiences don't go in for a lot of Elgar; Delius and Walton are pretty much fringe composers here, mainstream ones there. Strange. It's not like there's a level of difficulty or lack of melody in their music that makes listening a chore. Maybe it's just some sort of latent resentment over that unpleasantness on these shores in the late 1700s.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 27, 2001
"He plays like a gypsy." That was the verdict of some professionals at a music camp who heard a young violinist named Robert McDuffie. The boy didn't take offense. After all, his teacher back home in Macon, Ga., was a Hungarian who had taught him a lot about the Central European style of violin playing, with its elastic rhythms, richly expressive touches and a susceptibility to schmaltz. McDuffie never lost those attributes as he developed into one of America's leading violinists. He'll demonstrate that side of his musical personality this evening when he joins the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's Summer MusicFest for "A Night in Old Vienna," performing Franz Lehar's "Hungarian Fantasy" and sentimental favorites by Fritz Kreisler.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 19, 2001
Oscar Wilde observed that the English and the Americans have everything in common except the language. He might also have excepted the music. Folks on these shores have never been wildly fond of most British composers. Other than graduation day, audiences don't go in for a lot of Elgar; Delius and Walton are pretty much fringe composers here, mainstream ones there. Strange. It's not like there's a level of difficulty or lack of melody in their music that makes listening a chore. Maybe it's just some sort of latent resentment over that unpleasantness on these shores in the late 1700s.
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