Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPhilip Calvert
IN THE NEWS

Philip Calvert

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE | November 22, 1992
I arrived early at the Chapel Field on the morning they planned to raise the last of the three lead coffins from the sandy crypt in St. Mary's City. As had become my habit, I stopped first inside the gayly-striped green-and-white tent that sheltered the excavation, to see what work had been done there overnight.The gray, lead-wrapped coffin rested alone at the bottom of the pit, embraced now by a steel cradle and a framework of pine two-by-fours, fashioned to lend support during the delicate business of hoisting it from the earth.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Sarah Anchors and Sarah Anchors,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | January 26, 1999
ST. MARY'S CITY - In a vacant field the sun peeks through the wooden door frame marking where the first Catholic church in America once stood. The walls will soon be raised, too, one hand-made brick at a time, if a fund-raising campaign to re-create this piece of Colonial Maryland is successful.The chapel will sit across an archaeological park from the already reconstructed State House. In the spirit of separation of church and state, the Historic St. Mary's City Foundation and Friends is seeking mostly private donations to construct the religious building.
Advertisement
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 5, 1990
ST. MARY'S CITY -- A 17th-century crypt containing at least three lead coffins, possibly the burial place of Colonial Gov. Philip Calvert and other members of the family that founded Maryland, was uncovered here yesterday.Discovery of the crypt beneath the remains of the 1667 Great Brick Chapel, the cradle of Roman Catholicism in English-speaking North America, was hailed as among the most significant archaeological finds ever in the state."In terms of religious and political significance, it ranks extremely high," said Dr. Edward Papenfuse, state archivist.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1996
In 1695, the biggest and most fashionable private residence in St. Mary's City, and one of the most impressive in all of English America, was mysteriously blown apart by 900 pounds of gunpowder stored in its cellar.The mansion -- called St. Peter's Freehold by its owner, Maryland Chancellor Philip Calvert -- was never rebuilt. Maryland's capital was moved from St. Mary's to Annapolis, the settlement vanished beneath farmers' plows, and the location and appearance of St. Peter's were forgotten.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | November 13, 1990
ST. MARY'S CITY -- Archaeologists excavating the remains of the Great Brick Chapel in St. Mary's City have detected a mysterious object beneath the 323-year-old Catholic church's ruins.Ground-penetrating radar used to map disturbed earth beneath the chapel floor located the extremely dense object in August, under the north transept of the cross-shaped church. Project scientists say the object is even denser than the building's 3-foot-thick brick foundation."It could be something natural, like a rock," said Henry Miller, chief archaeologist for Historic St. Mary's City.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1996
In 1695, the biggest and most fashionable private residence in St. Mary's City, and one of the most impressive in all of English America, was mysteriously blown apart by 900 pounds of gunpowder stored in its cellar.The mansion -- called St. Peter's Freehold by its owner, Maryland Chancellor Philip Calvert -- was never rebuilt. Maryland's capital was moved from St. Mary's to Annapolis, the settlement vanished beneath farmers' plows, and the location and appearance of St. Peter's were forgotten.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | April 10, 1994
Havre de Grace. -- Walking in the fields earlier this spring I came across the skull of a squirrel, so white in the afternoon sunlight I thought for a moment it was a golf ball. As I picked it up it fell into two pieces in my hand.At first I wasn't sure it was a squirrel, but a little forensic scratching around in the grass turned up the rest of the skeleton. There was a little hair still attached to the tailbone. I left most of the bones where they were, but put half the skull in my pocket to take home to show my daughter.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The crypt beneath Chapel Field in St. Mary's City has a name again -- Calvert. And one of its dead has a face.Scientists and historians concluded unanimously yesterday that the adult remains found in the coffins unearthed in Maryland's vanished Colonial capital are those of Philip Calvert, the colony's first chancellor who died in 1682, and his first wife, Ann Wolsey Calvert, who died about 1680.The infant girl found buried beside the couple in November 1992 remains unidentified.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 1, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Three 17th-century lead coffins unearthed last December in St. Mary's City may yield their secrets -- including whether they contain members of Maryland's founding Calvert family -- as early as this fall.A panel of top experts on subjects ranging from neutron radiography to human remains met here yesterday to map out a plan for finding out who was buried in the coffins and what they can reveal about life in Colonial America."This is truly a unique project in the annals of American archaeology," said Henry Miller, director of research at Historic St. Mary's City, the site of Maryland's 1634 settlement.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | November 13, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- As his name might suggest, Charles Baltimore Calvert has more than a little interest in this week's opening of three lead coffins from what may be the 17th century crypt of Maryland's founding Calvert family."
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | April 10, 1994
Havre de Grace. -- Walking in the fields earlier this spring I came across the skull of a squirrel, so white in the afternoon sunlight I thought for a moment it was a golf ball. As I picked it up it fell into two pieces in my hand.At first I wasn't sure it was a squirrel, but a little forensic scratching around in the grass turned up the rest of the skeleton. There was a little hair still attached to the tailbone. I left most of the bones where they were, but put half the skull in my pocket to take home to show my daughter.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The crypt beneath Chapel Field in St. Mary's City has a name again -- Calvert. And one of its dead has a face.Scientists and historians concluded unanimously yesterday that the adult remains found in the coffins unearthed in Maryland's vanished Colonial capital are those of Philip Calvert, the colony's first chancellor who died in 1682, and his first wife, Ann Wolsey Calvert, who died about 1680.The infant girl found buried beside the couple in November 1992 remains unidentified.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE | November 22, 1992
I arrived early at the Chapel Field on the morning they planned to raise the last of the three lead coffins from the sandy crypt in St. Mary's City. As had become my habit, I stopped first inside the gayly-striped green-and-white tent that sheltered the excavation, to see what work had been done there overnight.The gray, lead-wrapped coffin rested alone at the bottom of the pit, embraced now by a steel cradle and a framework of pine two-by-fours, fashioned to lend support during the delicate business of hoisting it from the earth.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | November 14, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- There were no quick and easy answers yesterday for the scientists who opened the last of three 300-year-old lead coffins discovered here two years ago.But, like nearly everything else about this project, the adult skeleton uncovered in the ruins of Maryland's first Colonial capital will provide a team of researchers with priceless information about life, health and environmental issues in 17th-century America."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | November 13, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- As his name might suggest, Charles Baltimore Calvert has more than a little interest in this week's opening of three lead coffins from what may be the 17th century crypt of Maryland's founding Calvert family."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | October 2, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- Does the smallest of three lead coffins buried 300 years ago in Maryland's Colonial capital hold the remains of a cherished infant, or the jumbled bones of Maryland's first governor, Leonard Calvert?Over the next seven weeks, scientists hope to answer that question and many more as they re-enter what they believe to be the Calvert family crypt, discovered two years ago beneath St. Mary's City's vanished Great Brick Chapel -- birthplace of Catholicism in English America.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | May 12, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- In a sort of dress rehearsal for the excavation later this year of three lead coffins believed to hold the remains of Maryland's founding Calvert family, scientists have entered another 17th-century churchyard crypt to study the coffins of Maryland's first royal governor and his wife.Experts entered the massive brick burial vault of Sir Lionel Copley and his wife, Anne, in the Trinity Episcopal churchyard April 30. The Copleys died in St. Mary's City in 1694. At a news conference here yesterday, scientists said the daylong entry into the Copley vault, done with permission of church officials, provided them with important data on the construction of lead coffins in the 17th century.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | November 14, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- There were no quick and easy answers yesterday for the scientists who opened the last of three 300-year-old lead coffins discovered here two years ago.But, like nearly everything else about this project, the adult skeleton uncovered in the ruins of Maryland's first Colonial capital will provide a team of researchers with priceless information about life, health and environmental issues in 17th-century America."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | May 12, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- In a sort of dress rehearsal for the excavation later this year of three lead coffins believed to hold the remains of Maryland's founding Calvert family, scientists have entered another 17th century churchyard crypt to study the coffins of Maryland's first royal governor and his wife.Experts on April 30 entered the massive brick burial vault of Sir Lionel Copley and his wife, Anne, in the Trinity Episcopal churchyard. The Copleys died in St. Mary's City in 1694. At a news conference here yesterday, scientists said the daylong entry into the Copley vault, done with permission of church officials, provided them with important data on the construction of lead coffins in the 17th century.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | May 12, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- In a sort of dress rehearsal for the excavation later this year of three lead coffins believed to hold the remains of Maryland's founding Calvert family, scientists have entered another 17th-century churchyard crypt to study the coffins of Maryland's first royal governor and his wife.Experts entered the massive brick burial vault of Sir Lionel Copley and his wife, Anne, in the Trinity Episcopal churchyard April 30. The Copleys died in St. Mary's City in 1694. At a news conference here yesterday, scientists said the daylong entry into the Copley vault, done with permission of church officials, provided them with important data on the construction of lead coffins in the 17th century.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.