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NEWS
March 17, 2014
Ted Hart will be part of the 8th Annual AFP-MD Harford County Celebration of Philanthropy on April 10 at the Water's Edge Corporate Center. Hart's morning educational session, "Social Networking & Online Fundraising Success" will precede the luncheon celebrating businesses and individuals whose exceptional generosity demonstrates outstanding civic and charitable responsibility, and whose example encourages others to be leaders in philanthropy in...
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NEWS
August 19, 2014
Doug Donovan is a member of the investigative team at The Baltimore Sun, where his work has led to state and federal public corruption investigations into City Hall. The Newark, Del.-native began his career as editor-in-chief of the University of Delaware student newspaper and has written for The Philadelphia Inquirer, The (Raleigh, N.C.) News & Observer, Forbes Magazine and the Chronicle of Philanthropy. He was also a senior editor for Patch.com. His freelance work has been featured in the New York Times, Men's Health, Baltimore magazine, and on WYPR Radio, Baltimore's NPR affiliate.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2010
So what do you give this holiday to the person who has everything — or simply doesn't need more things? Consider the gift of philanthropy. Charities are making it easier than ever. Many offer gift cards that recipients can use to make online donations to specific projects in their own backyard or across the globe. Donations can be small, with some groups accepting as little as $1 or $10. "Not everyone is a Bill Gates who can influence society on such a massive scale," says Bennett Weiner, chief operating officer with the BBB Wise Giving Alliance, part of the Better Business Bureau.
NEWS
March 17, 2014
Ted Hart will be part of the 8th Annual AFP-MD Harford County Celebration of Philanthropy on April 10 at the Water's Edge Corporate Center. Hart's morning educational session, "Social Networking & Online Fundraising Success" will precede the luncheon celebrating businesses and individuals whose exceptional generosity demonstrates outstanding civic and charitable responsibility, and whose example encourages others to be leaders in philanthropy in...
EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawata | April 1, 2011
A new generation of female philanthropists is growing up in Howard County thanks to the Women's Giving Circle and 14 teenagers who feel as passionately about helping others as their mothers and grandmothers. The Young Women's Giving Circle formed last year as a pilot project, with the goal of teaching high school girls how to become an informed and intentional force for good in the county. Led by high school seniors Jackie Dawson, of Mt. Hebron, and Julie Factor, of Glenelg, members of the small circle with big intentions spent the past 10 months attending workshops on grant making and fundraising, interviewing and visiting various nonprofits, all so they could learn how to raise money and then give it away to a cause they care about.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2010
There are at least four Neha Deshpandes. There is Neha the scholar, who earned her first A in a college course as an eighth-grader and will graduate Thursday after finishing her pre-med track at the Johns Hopkins University in three years. There is Neha the researcher, who nagged a Rutgers professor into letting her work in his genetics lab at age 13, and is attempting to publish research comparing 70 mother-child pairs in Baltimore and India. That Neha recently won a $30,000 Truman Scholarship, which she'll use to study transplant outcomes in the next year in medically underserved sections of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1995
Merrimon Cuninggim, an educator who was one of the nation's foremost authorities on philanthropy, died Wednesday of prostate cancer at Broadmead retirement community. He was 84.Besides his work in philanthropy, he was an ordained Methodist minister who once was dean of the Perkins School of Theology of Southern Methodist University in Dallas.It was during his leadership that Perkins became the first graduate school in the South to desegregate, two years before the Supreme Court decision, Brown vs. Board of Education, in 1954.
BUSINESS
By Lester A. Picker | April 1, 1991
Philanthropy is so ingrained into the American psyche that it is almost a rote response.We attend the weekly church or synagogue service and drop off our checks for support. During the week, we open one of countless letters appealing to us for money. Perhaps today's letter touches our heart and we return $10 to help. At work, we listen somewhat reluctantly to the annual United Way appeal, yet when it is over, we check off that little box which means a still larger bite out of our paycheck -- and we actually feel good about doing so.Without a doubt, Americans are the most charitable people on Earth.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Diana K. Sugg contributed to this article | July 28, 1995
The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation, a Baltimore philanthropy almost as reclusive as the couple it is named after, now appears ready to play a more public role in the city's life.Yesterday, officials announced that the Weinberg Foundation had pledged $20 million toward the Johns Hopkins Hospital's cancer center -- the largest gift in the history of both the philanthropy and the hospital.Last year, trustees of the foundation awarded $15 million to Sinai Hospital in Northwest Baltimore, where a building is now named after them.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | December 19, 2005
BOSTON -- The kitchen table was set with the usual utensils for our annual family conference: a mug of coffee, a pot of tea, a stack of fundraising requests, a checkbook and a pen. Our domestic scene was by no means unique. Americans donate about $250 billion a year. We give half of it between Thanksgiving and Christmas, driven by seasonal good will and (blush) an IRS deadline. This week alone, thousands of families will put billions of dollars into sealed envelopes all destined to do good.
NEWS
By Jim Joyner, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
It was a reunion of sorts when Kavita M. Shukla came to Howard County to be with students from her former middle school - or if not a reunion, at least a field trip. For members of the student council at Burleigh Manor Middle School in Ellicott City, a recent tour of the Grassroots Crisis Intervention Center in Columbia alongside Shukla was a chance to donate to the community and connect with an inventor and entrepreneur who once followed the path they are now walking. Shukla is founder and CEO of Fenugreen, a Massachusetts company marketing a product she developed years ago, essentially from a science project at Burleigh Manor, which she attended until 1998.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Say the word "philanthropist" and the names of the wealthy and powerful come to mind. But philanthropists don't need to make million-dollar gifts to help change lives. Many nonprofits in the Baltimore area thrive by receiving many small gifts - the result of people of average means putting aside a little money to benefit a good cause. To mark the season of giving, we offer snapshots of donors and beneficiaries at three nonprofit groups that use small gifts to make a big difference in the Baltimore area.
EXPLORE
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2013
Pikesville resident Debra Attman is well known as a local philanthropist, providing the driving energy behind several events, including the Chocolate Affair, the annual event benefiting Health Care for the Homeless. But it was her work with The Associated, the Baltimore branch of the Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA), and its women's giving group that brought a recent revelation: Attman had never been to Israel. That changed earlier this month, when she was one of 54 women, including 13 from the Baltimore area, who signed on for a six-day trip to Israel.
NEWS
January 29, 2013
The great news of New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg's wonderful gift to Johns Hopkins University, which will also benefit our city and state, was relegated to page two of The Sun ("Bloomberg donates $350 million to Johns Hopkins for research, scholarships," June 26). However, the Sunday New York Times featured it on the front page. Shame on The Sun. Fay Greenbaum
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2013
New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg is donating $350 million to the Johns Hopkins University for student financial aid and research addressing "complex global challenges," one of the largest-ever gifts to a university, bringing Bloomberg's support of the Baltimore institution to more than $1.1 billion. The gift will provide $100 million over 10 years for an estimated 2,600 undergraduate scholarships. The remaining $250 million will be invested $50 million at a time over five years into endowments supporting 50 new faculty members charged with interdisciplinary research and teaching.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2013
In its second year awarding grants, the Women's Giving Circle of Harford County gave 11 nonprofit organizations nearly $36,000 in 2012 to help women and girls in the county. Four thousand dollars went to the local Arc chapter to help single parents; $2,500 went to the Upper Chesapeake Health Foundation for a program to help children of people with cancer. Then there was $1,696 to the Highlands School, a private school in Bel Air for children with dyslexia and other learning disabilities in kindergarten through the eighth grade.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mark Dowie and Mark Dowie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 28, 2003
The hardest thing for anyone writing about philanthropy to fathom is motive. Why do people give away money? Are they driven by religious fervor, the urge to avoid taxation, guilt, noblesse oblige, a desire for immortality, a hidden agenda, narcissism, altruism or a psychopolitical admixture of some or all of the above? Do rich people, who seem to donate proportionately less of their wealth than others, give it away for reasons different from those of the poor or people of average means?
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | June 26, 1993
On the 12th floor of the Mercantile Bank Building, one of Baltimore's most obscure foundations practices its quirky brand of philanthropy.While the door is marked -- Anna Emory Warfield Memorial Fund -- its only employee, a part-time secretary, is seldom in the tiny cubicle. Those who wish to apply may do so by telephone, as long as they meet the fund's rather narrow criteria: "To try and keep elderly women in independent living status in the style to which they were accustomed."In other words, the Warfield Fund gives money to women who cannot afford to stay in their homes -- even if those addresses are in well-to-do neighborhoods such as Roland Park or Guilford, as some are. The fund, which has assets of $3.7 million and doles out about $160,000 annually in parcels of $975 to $4,225, also helps out men occasionally.
FEATURES
Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
No question, it's been a tough economy for many nonprofits to raise money. But Marriottsville-based DonorSearch, launched the same year the economy plunged into the latest recession, has developed a database to help nonprofits identify which of their contributors are more likely to give more if asked and what type of gift they are likely to make, said CEO Bill Tedesco. Tedesco said he started his career in public administration, moved into computers, then on to fundraising in Baltimore before getting into donor prospect research services.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | October 12, 2012
It's been said that the right outfit can make or break you. And nowhere is a good first impression more crucial than a job interview. But not everyone has a business suit hanging in the closet. That's where Success In Style comes in. The organization, which is celebrating its 10th year, is dedicated to helping disadvantaged men and women dress for success for job interviews. The organization also provides fashion advice and interview coaching. Ellicott City resident Jeannette Kendall founded Success In Style (SIS)
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