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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Jarnetta Kroh, a Greater Baltimore Medical Center philanthropist who assisted her husband in his import car servicing business, died Nov. 25 of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder at her home in Laguna Hills, Calif. She was 81 and had lived in the Rockland section of Baltimore County for many years. Jarnetta Althea Jarvis was born in Spencer, W.Va., and raised in Walton, W.Va., where her father was postmaster. Her mother was a secretary to a May Co. department store executive.
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FEATURES
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
The Scunny Memorial Paddle, which ran from Sept. 16 to 21, turned out to be even less fun than Christopher Furst, a marketing director for Power Plant Live, thought it would be. And the novice kayaker didn't go in expecting the 175-mile kayak trip was going to be a day at the beach. "In all honesty, it was the hardest thing I've ever done in my life. I've played every sport, baseball, football," Furst said, "but this was sheer endurance, paddling eight hours a day in an uncomfortable position.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2013
Mildred A. "Mitzi" Blumenthal, a former substitute teacher and philanthropist, died Monday from anemia at Sunrise of Pikesville, an assisted-living facility. She was 96. The former Mildred Alexander was born in Baltimore and raised on Loyola Southway in Lower Park Heights. She was a 1933 graduate of Western High School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1937 from Goucher College, where she was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. She worked as a forensic chemist for the federal government during World War II and for many years as a substitute teacher.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
Gordon Gund is the CEO of a venture capitalist fund, the former principal owner of the Cleveland Cavaliers and a member of the Kellogg Co.'s board of directors. He has also been blind for more than 40 years. On Saturday, Gund announced that his family plans to give $50 million or more in matching gifts to the Foundation Fighting Blindness, a Columbia-based nonprofit that he co-founded. "Our family is committed to finishing the job we helped start, and we hope this Challenge requires us to match as much as is needed to fast-track progress for promising treatments from the lab to clinical trials," Gund said in a statement.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 4, 2011
Ruth R. Marder, a Baltimore philanthropist whose charitable interests ranged from the arts to educational and medical institutions, died Jan. 28 of cancer at her Roland Park Place home. She was 83. Born in Pittsburgh, Ruth Rosenberg was the daughter of Henry A. Rosenberg Sr., who had been president of Crown Central Petroleum Co., and Ruth Blaustein Rosenberg. She was the granddaughter of Louis Blaustein, founder of the American Oil Co. She was raised at Rainbow Hill, her family's Owings Mills estate, that had once been the home of Gen. Douglas MacArthur and his first wife, Henriette Louis Cromwell Brooks, in the 1920s.
NEWS
December 30, 2011
With Ed Hale retiring as First Mariner's CEO and chairman, I only hope that Baltimoreans realize the importance of retaining this man in our area ("First Mariner's Hale steps down," Dec. 24). I've known Ed for several decades and he is a true Baltimorean, a philanthropist, a very good tennis player and a great moral leader. He is a true treasure. James A. Holechek, Baltimore
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater | November 15, 2012
For a foundation whose business it is to support charities, it's only natural that the Columbia Foundation would know a few good philanthropists. And so the foundation plans to honor those doing great things in the Howard County community through its new Philanthropist of the Year awards. The foundation's annual dinner this year coincides with National Philanthropy Day, Nov. 15 - a fitting day to recognize inaugural honorees the Lundy family and Harkins Builders. The corporate/organizational award will be presented to Harkins Builders, an employee-owned company based in Marriottsville and led by CEO Richard Lombardo.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
It is doubtful in all of the hullabaloo and hype leading up to Super Bowl XLVII that the name of one non-football-playing Baltimorean will be mentioned: John McDonogh, the philanthropist, who left an indelible mark not only on his native city but also in New Orleans for his endowment of public schools for poor children. A reader, Bill Rowe, who graduated from McDonogh School in 1970, recently brought to my attention McDonogh's philanthropic endeavors, which probably outside of the McDonogh community have largely been forgotten.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1999
Victor Frenkil, the politically connected contractor and philanthropist, died yesterday of heart failure at Sinai Hospital. He was 90.Mr. Frenkil's firm, Baltimore Contractors Inc., built several local landmarks, including the Baltimore Arena, the Herbert R. O'Conor State Office Building on West Preston Street and the Poly-Western high schools complex on West Cold Spring Lane.Among his acquaintances, he counted presidents, governors and other elected officials.The short, balding, avuncular-looking man with a wide smile was an inveterate and lifelong Democrat, but he never forgot his Republican friends.
NEWS
November 16, 1999
In honor of National Philanthropy Day yesterday, the Maryland Chapter of the National Society of Fund Raising Executives recognized a Baltimore philanthropist, a foundation and students at four schools for their charitable work.Suzanne F. Cohen, a member of numerous local nonprofit boards, was named philanthropist of the year for her support of institutions like Goucher College and her work creating the Safe and Sound campaign, a program to improve life and reduce violence for Baltimore children with after-school programs and other initiatives.
NEWS
By Quinn Kelley, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Friends and family remembered philanthropist and Whiting-Turner Co. CEO Willard Hackerman on Tuesday as a loyal and smart businessman who was generous with his time and money. Rabbi Mitchell Wohlberg eulogized Hackerman before hundreds of mourners at Beth Tfiloh Congregation. Hackerman, a donor to numerous institutions, including his alma mater the Johns Hopkins University, died Monday at 95 of unknown causes at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Hackerman, who grew up in Forest Park, was ingrained in projects and philanthropy in Maryland for decades.
NEWS
February 10, 2014
Willard Hackerman held no public office, but he was as much a city father to Baltimore as any mayor or City Council member, delegate or senator. Few, if any, have had a larger impact on this community than the 95-year-old man who died at Johns Hopkins Hospital Monday morning, and few have demonstrated greater devotion to it. Mr. Hackerman, the builder of the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the National Aquarium and the Baltimore Convention Center, has...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Philanthropist Willard Hackerman, who transformed a small construction firm into a national giant with $5 billion in annual billings and was instrumental in erecting Maryland landmarks such as Harborplace, died Monday of unknown causes at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 95. His firm, Whiting-Turner Contracting Co., completed the new University of Baltimore School of Law last year and built the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the National Aquarium and M&T Bank Stadium, among countless other projects around the city and state.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2014
Richard M. Lansburgh, a retired clothier, philanthropist and patron of the arts, died of multiple organ failure Tuesday at the Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center, one day before his 92nd birthday. He lived in North Baltimore. He was born during a record-setting blizzard in 1922 at his parents' Park Heights Avenue home, Terremont. His father, Sidney Lansburgh, was an official of American General Corp., and his mother, Marian Epstein, was the daughter of Jacob Epstein, who created a flourishing wholesale merchandise business, the Baltimore Bargain House.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper and Sloane Brown, The Baltimore Sun and By Julie Scharper and Sloane Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Brothers Justin and Jeremy Batoff are about to trade in their condominium overlooking the lacrosse fields at Johns Hopkins, their alma mater, for a Greenspring Valley farmhouse. They share a real estate portfolio. They work together at the family law firm. And they fill their free time with the same pursuits - fine art, evening games of squash, fox hunts and steeple chases. "After Justin got into racing, I figured, 'There's nothing we can do alone, so how can I get involved without actually getting on a horse?
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
On the field next to Northeast Middle School, young refugees Abhishek Yonghang and Ahmed Osman kicked a soccer ball around, each grateful for the common connection as they adjust to a new life far from their former homes in Nepal and Somalia. Three miles away in a classroom at Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School, junior Wayne Young slipped a suit jacket over his school uniform for debate practice with the Urban Debate League, trying to "look the part" of the Harvard law grad he envisions himself to one day be. The lives of these Baltimore teens are among the thousands influenced by George Soros, a billionaire philanthropist who decided 15 years ago that the city, with severe crime and poverty and just enough potential, was ripe for an experiment.
NEWS
By DOUGLAS BIRCH and DOUGLAS BIRCH,SUN REPORTER | April 18, 2006
John G. Rangos Sr., a Pittsburgh philanthropist, has promised to give $10 million for work at several academic research centers planned for the Johns Hopkins University's biotechnology park in East Baltimore, the university said yesterday. The announcement of the gift came as the university broke ground on the $800 million, 80-acre project on Wolfe Street just north of Hopkins' medical campus. The gift is tied with 16 others as the 23rd-largest in the history of the university, said Dennis O'Shea, a university spokesman.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2013
Mildred A. "Mitzi" Blumenthal, a former substitute teacher and philanthropist, died Monday from anemia at Sunrise of Pikesville, an assisted-living facility. She was 96. The former Mildred Alexander was born in Baltimore and raised on Loyola Southway in Lower Park Heights. She was a 1933 graduate of Western High School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1937 from Goucher College, where she was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. She worked as a forensic chemist for the federal government during World War II and for many years as a substitute teacher.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
George R. Frank, a Baltimore businessman, packaging executive and philanthropist, died Friday from congestive heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 88. "George was serious, had his principles, knew what he wanted and worked very hard. And he let everyone know that," said Howard A. Kelly, who had been Mr. Frank's vice president of sales. "He was close to everyone, and even though he was the boss, we knew what to do to make the company move. He was just a great entrepreneur," said Mr. Kelly who is retired and lives in Rising Sun. The son of George A. "Buck" Frank Jr., who had worked in the metal can industry and Annella Nicoletti Frank, a homemaker, George Ralph Frank was born in East Rutherford, N.J., in 1925.
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