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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 14, 1996
PHILADELPHIA - The fire that left 23 primates dead of smoke inhalation at the Philadelphia Zoo in December was caused by an improperly installed heating cable in the roof of their quarters, not by questionable actions of guards that night, zoo officials said yesterday.In presenting the results of two internal investigations one by zoo staff members, the other by zoo board members the officials said the reports agreed with the major findings of the Philadelphia Fire Department's investigation, announced last month, that the fire "was accidental in nature" and that the zoo's security and fire detection systems were working properly at the time.
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NEWS
Lionel Foster | February 7, 2013
After hearing where I'm from, many strangers have looked at me as if I'd said I was recently cured of leprosy. Their expressions speak volumes: "How he manages to smile, I will never know. I'm glad he's OK, but, God, I hope he's not contagious. " They hear about our crime and violence. David Simon is a genius, but I worry that some of his less reflective fans view Baltimore basically as a prime location for a blaxploitation/zombie crossover film. Others don't like our accent. We have been held in such low esteem that Hollywood thought it was OK to destroy part of the city with a nuclear bomb ("The Sum of All Fears," 2002)
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SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 18, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- Forget your cheese-steaks-for-a-case-of-Labatts deals.The zoos of Philadelphia and Toronto are betting wild things on the outcome of the World Series.Should the Blue Jays win, the Philadelphia Zoo will send two white lion cubs to the Metro Toronto Zoo.And a Phillies victory would put a Philadelphia postmark on a pair of young Tasmanian devils."I have no doubt whatsoever that those devils will be coming south," Philadelphia Zoo spokeswoman Antoinette Maciolek said.Neither the lions nor the meat-eating marsupials have been born yet, but their mothers are showing.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | March 21, 2007
The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore announced yesterday the cancellation of plans to bring three African elephants from Philadelphia, citing a delay in the expansion of its elephant exhibit amid a dire financial situation. The elephants were scheduled to arrive in late spring or early summer from the Philadelphia Zoo - a move that Maryland Zoo officials had hoped would accelerate its breeding program and deliver a much-needed boost in attendance at the zoo in Druid Hill Park, which has suffered financially in recent years from a decline in visitors.
NEWS
October 10, 2006
Think the impending military Base Realignment and Closure plan, with its anticipated influx of 40,000 new residents to the region, will put pressure on the local housing and highway infrastructures? Then consider what's scheduled to take place at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore late next spring when the pachyderm population will increase by 150 percent. Under an arrangement between the Philadelphia Zoo and the Maryland Zoo, three African elephants named Petal, Kallie and Bette will be transferred from their home near the not-so-savannaesque Schuylkill Expressway for new lodgings at an improved and enlarged range in Druid Hill Park.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 31, 1995
PHILADELPHIA -- Many of the melancholy bouquets delivered to the Philadelphia Zoo last week are adorned with little bananas and apples, symbolic gifts to the 23 gorillas and gibbons, lemurs and orangutans that died Christmas Eve in the country's worst calamity for zoo animals.Not quite human, the simian families that perished from a smoky fire have left behind not only an aching grief but also potentially irreparable holes in the gene pool for the country's primate population."I cannot think of anything comparable to this loss in North America," said Kevin Willis, a conservation biologist at the American Zoo and Aquarium Association.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 7, 1996
PHILADELPHIA -- He's a proven stud, winner of a Best of Cincinnati award for siring five western-lowland gorillas this year alone.And in the words of his current curator, he is in that "punk" stage -- constantly charging the bars, smacking a female on the side as he passes her, saying: "Hey, I'm running this group."Chaka, an 11-year-old, 250-pound gorilla whose saddle is just starting to gray, left Philadelphia two years ago on a breeding loan. His parents were Samantha and John, two of the 23 animals who perished in the Dec. 24 electrical fire at the Philadelphia Zoo's World of Primates.
NEWS
October 6, 2006
Md. zoo awaiting arrival of elephants Elephants Dolly and Ana have long reigned as a major attraction at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore. In 2003, when dire financial straits at the zoo threatened to send the elephants packing, the public rallied and donations poured in. And Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. - a Republican whose party mascot happens to resemble them - forked over millions in state aid. The big girls were saved from extinction (at the zoo anyway)....
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 5, 2006
PHILADELPHIA --When the Philadelphia Zoo, the nation's first, opened in 1874, its curators bought an elephant from a traveling circus and chained it to a tree, delighting children and adults who had never seen such an animal up close. Over the ensuing 132 years, elephants have been a big part of the zoo's attraction. They have often been featured on advertising posters and commercials, and zoo administrators say visitors spend an average of five to eight minutes gazing at them in their rather small habitat.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | November 17, 2003
PHILADELPHIA - There is so much to like about this town and, of course, the main thing is that it's home to the most perfect food in the world, the cheesesteak sandwich, which tastes so wonderful it can make you weep. If you eat too many Philly cheesesteak sandwiches - I don't have a firm number on this, but let's say, oh, 20,000 over the course of a lifetime - you will eventually keel over and need an angioplasty. But that is a small price to pay for the pleasure of thinly sliced steak and provolone smothered with fried onions, sweet peppers, hot peppers and mushrooms on fresh Italian bread.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 5, 2006
PHILADELPHIA --When the Philadelphia Zoo, the nation's first, opened in 1874, its curators bought an elephant from a traveling circus and chained it to a tree, delighting children and adults who had never seen such an animal up close. Over the ensuing 132 years, elephants have been a big part of the zoo's attraction. They have often been featured on advertising posters and commercials, and zoo administrators say visitors spend an average of five to eight minutes gazing at them in their rather small habitat.
NEWS
October 10, 2006
Think the impending military Base Realignment and Closure plan, with its anticipated influx of 40,000 new residents to the region, will put pressure on the local housing and highway infrastructures? Then consider what's scheduled to take place at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore late next spring when the pachyderm population will increase by 150 percent. Under an arrangement between the Philadelphia Zoo and the Maryland Zoo, three African elephants named Petal, Kallie and Bette will be transferred from their home near the not-so-savannaesque Schuylkill Expressway for new lodgings at an improved and enlarged range in Druid Hill Park.
NEWS
October 6, 2006
Md. zoo awaiting arrival of elephants Elephants Dolly and Ana have long reigned as a major attraction at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore. In 2003, when dire financial straits at the zoo threatened to send the elephants packing, the public rallied and donations poured in. And Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. - a Republican whose party mascot happens to resemble them - forked over millions in state aid. The big girls were saved from extinction (at the zoo anyway)....
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | November 17, 2003
PHILADELPHIA - There is so much to like about this town and, of course, the main thing is that it's home to the most perfect food in the world, the cheesesteak sandwich, which tastes so wonderful it can make you weep. If you eat too many Philly cheesesteak sandwiches - I don't have a firm number on this, but let's say, oh, 20,000 over the course of a lifetime - you will eventually keel over and need an angioplasty. But that is a small price to pay for the pleasure of thinly sliced steak and provolone smothered with fried onions, sweet peppers, hot peppers and mushrooms on fresh Italian bread.
TRAVEL
By Randi Kest | July 11, 1999
ANOTHER GOLDEN ERA FOR ROMEAfter nearly 20 years of renovations, Nero's famous Italian palace, Domus Aurea (which means Golden House), reopened last month. Built between the years 64 A.D. and 68 A.D., the palace was known for its size and opulence and also for its historical significance.When the Flavian dynasty came to power after Nero's suicide in 68 A.D., they started dismantling Domus Aurea in an attempt to erase the emperor and his tyrannical rule from history. The palace remained buried beneath soil until the late 15th century.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 14, 1996
PHILADELPHIA - The fire that left 23 primates dead of smoke inhalation at the Philadelphia Zoo in December was caused by an improperly installed heating cable in the roof of their quarters, not by questionable actions of guards that night, zoo officials said yesterday.In presenting the results of two internal investigations one by zoo staff members, the other by zoo board members the officials said the reports agreed with the major findings of the Philadelphia Fire Department's investigation, announced last month, that the fire "was accidental in nature" and that the zoo's security and fire detection systems were working properly at the time.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | March 21, 2007
The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore announced yesterday the cancellation of plans to bring three African elephants from Philadelphia, citing a delay in the expansion of its elephant exhibit amid a dire financial situation. The elephants were scheduled to arrive in late spring or early summer from the Philadelphia Zoo - a move that Maryland Zoo officials had hoped would accelerate its breeding program and deliver a much-needed boost in attendance at the zoo in Druid Hill Park, which has suffered financially in recent years from a decline in visitors.
TRAVEL
By Randi Kest | July 11, 1999
ANOTHER GOLDEN ERA FOR ROMEAfter nearly 20 years of renovations, Nero's famous Italian palace, Domus Aurea (which means Golden House), reopened last month. Built between the years 64 A.D. and 68 A.D., the palace was known for its size and opulence and also for its historical significance.When the Flavian dynasty came to power after Nero's suicide in 68 A.D., they started dismantling Domus Aurea in an attempt to erase the emperor and his tyrannical rule from history. The palace remained buried beneath soil until the late 15th century.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 7, 1996
PHILADELPHIA -- He's a proven stud, winner of a Best of Cincinnati award for siring five western-lowland gorillas this year alone.And in the words of his current curator, he is in that "punk" stage -- constantly charging the bars, smacking a female on the side as he passes her, saying: "Hey, I'm running this group."Chaka, an 11-year-old, 250-pound gorilla whose saddle is just starting to gray, left Philadelphia two years ago on a breeding loan. His parents were Samantha and John, two of the 23 animals who perished in the Dec. 24 electrical fire at the Philadelphia Zoo's World of Primates.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 31, 1995
PHILADELPHIA -- Many of the melancholy bouquets delivered to the Philadelphia Zoo last week are adorned with little bananas and apples, symbolic gifts to the 23 gorillas and gibbons, lemurs and orangutans that died Christmas Eve in the country's worst calamity for zoo animals.Not quite human, the simian families that perished from a smoky fire have left behind not only an aching grief but also potentially irreparable holes in the gene pool for the country's primate population."I cannot think of anything comparable to this loss in North America," said Kevin Willis, a conservation biologist at the American Zoo and Aquarium Association.
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