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By Ron Rapoport and Ron Rapoport,Los Angeles Daily News | October 21, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- I am watching this game with a towel over my face.I am trying to sit here with a straight face as I take in the majesty and the grandeur of the World Series and all the time I am worried that a little car is going to pull up and 50 clowns are going to jump out and start chasing Mitch Williams around the field.I am here for the world championship of baseball and I am watching the fat man's softball game at the company picnic.This is the silliest baseball game I have ever seen.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
A down-to-earth guy from a working-class city is determined to succeed in a tough business. Punching above his weight, he beats the odds and makes it into the ring, cheered on by a crowd that includes a woman who shares his modest roots and encourages his big dreams. That's not just the scenario of the wildly popular 1976 film "Rocky. " It also works as the art-imitating-art story line for the two Baltimore-area actors starring in the new musical version of "Rocky" that opens this week on Broadway.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 21, 1999
Bowie Community Theatre's current production of Philip Barry's "The Philadelphia Story" provides a satisfying evening of theater on several levels.The play -- commissioned for a young Katharine Hepburn -- opened on Broadway in 1939. Hepburn took it to Hollywood, where it became a 1940 classic film also starring Cary Grant and Jimmy Stewart. Later it was reborn in a 1956 movie called "High Society" starring Grace Kelly, Frank Sinatra and Bing Crosby with music by Cole Porter.In 1998, "High Society" resurfaced with additional Porter tunes.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2008
"One of the prettiest sights in this pretty world is the privileged classes enjoying their privileges," says journalist Mike Connor in The Philadelphia Story, now at Colonial Players in Annapolis. The show is a visual feast, with well-dressed, attractive characters and elegant furnishings illustrating the lifestyle of a Philadelphia Main Line family engaging in drawing-room repartee. The most requested show by Colonial Players subscribers, The Philadelphia Story was chosen to open the 60th-anniversary season.
NEWS
By Nelson Pressley and Nelson Pressley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 9, 2000
Philip Barry's "The Philadelphia Story" already exists as one of Hollywood's few perfect movies, and you can rent it anytime at your local video store. But is that any reason not to put this 1939 play on the stage? Hardly. Director David Hilder's production at Columbia's Rep Stage serves this lovely comic fable well, holding the audience rapt with Barry's glistening dialogue and glib characters. The show has a splendid center in Michelle Shupe, whose portrayal of Tracy Lord (the brittle rich girl who finds her heart)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2008
"One of the prettiest sights in this pretty world is the privileged classes enjoying their privileges," says journalist Mike Connor in The Philadelphia Story, now at Colonial Players in Annapolis. The show is a visual feast, with well-dressed, attractive characters and elegant furnishings illustrating the lifestyle of a Philadelphia Main Line family engaging in drawing-room repartee. The most requested show by Colonial Players subscribers, The Philadelphia Story was chosen to open the 60th-anniversary season.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | August 25, 1996
"James Stewart: A Biography," by Donald Dewey. Turner Publishing. 521 pages, $24.95.On screen James Stewart played anybody's son. He was the vulnerable, unthreatening hero, kind-hearted and plain-talking, a voice of reason and common sense. His performances were characterized by a monologue he spoke in a slow drawl, every sound scrupulously enunciated, evoking the small town of Indiana, Pa, where he was born. Stewart created a stereotype of the quintessential American, nowhere better than in Frank Capra's "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" (1939)
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | August 30, 2008
Turner Classic Movies' "Summer Under the Stars" ends this weekend with two days dedicated to that most storied of Hollywood couples who never made it to the altar, Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn. Tracy gets his turn tomorrow (don't miss Captains Courageous at 8 p.m.), but today it's the Great Kate's turn. For a look at what made Hepburn such an endlessly intriguing personality (as well as a role model to a whole generation of women), check out a 1973 appearance she made on The Dick Cavett Show (11:15 a.m.)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 12, 1997
Movie fans will have to look no further than TCM all weekend, as the folks at Turner salute the late Jimmy Stewart with a 48-hour, 23-film salute to one of Hollywood's best, running from 6 a.m. today until 6 a.m. Monday.Since the films are airing chronologically (beginning with 1936's "Rose Marie"), the best stuff isn't necessarily reserved for prime time; in fact, some of Stewart's most memorable films will air in the wee hours of the morning. But arguably the best of the bunch, 1950's "Harvey," comes on when the whole family can enjoy it: 4 p.m. tomorrow.
NEWS
December 15, 1994
OUR NEIGHBORS to the north in Philadelphia are still coping with the aftermath of the fatal baseball bat beating of a 16-year-old high school student at the hands of other teens in a northeast section of that city, as well as the belated response of 911 operators.On Veterans Day, Edward Polec had his skull fractured seven times as some of his attackers held him up to allow someone else to get a clean shot at him with a bat.Philadelphia police have arrested several suspects and are continuing to investigate the murder.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | August 30, 2008
Turner Classic Movies' "Summer Under the Stars" ends this weekend with two days dedicated to that most storied of Hollywood couples who never made it to the altar, Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn. Tracy gets his turn tomorrow (don't miss Captains Courageous at 8 p.m.), but today it's the Great Kate's turn. For a look at what made Hepburn such an endlessly intriguing personality (as well as a role model to a whole generation of women), check out a 1973 appearance she made on The Dick Cavett Show (11:15 a.m.)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 16, 2005
On a muggy late-summer night, any movie set in San Francisco, where the fog cools and drains the air and wipes it clean, is apt to feel refreshing. That goes even for a movie as fifth-hand as Just Like Heaven. This boy-meets-ghost-loses-ghost-gets-ghost story blends ingredients from every spectral romance ever made. But when the shaggy boy (Mark Ruffalo) and the well-coiffed ghost (Reese Witherspoon) bop up and down hills filled with seductive and eccentric cityscapes, the setting provides its own fairy-tale uplift.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | May 16, 2004
DO NOT be taken in by the great story of Smarty Jones any longer. Do not be fooled by the Philadelphia hoopla or the parochial references to the Phillies or Flyers or the last time that sports-crazed city saw one of its teams win a title. It was the 76ers, back in 1983. No wonder they're always booing Santa Claus. No wonder Smarty Jones is remaking Philly the city of equine love. Do not be hoodwinked by the fanfare for a common man, which is the theme for every down-home, not-so-blue-blood connection to Smarty Jones.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | January 18, 2004
Cary Grant was born 100 years ago today in Bristol, England. The fantasy life of England, America, and all of planet Earth would never be the same. In his 34-year big-screen career, he epitomized -- and for many, defined -- the man of the world. When Frank Sinatra presented an honorary Oscar in 1970 to Grant "for his unique mastery of the art of screen acting," Sinatra said, with legend-to-legend sympathy, that he earned it "for being Cary Grant." Actually, he earned it for acting Cary Grant: the urban cavalier with a quick tongue and cunning moves.
NEWS
October 8, 2003
Slayton House Theatre in Wilde Lake Village Center will start the 2003-2004 season of its "Marvelous Movies and More" film series with The Philadelphia Story, a 1940 film starring Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant and James Stewart, at 7:30 Oct. 17. Dessert and coffee will be served after a short discussion. The cost is $7. Seating is limited. The Mollycoddle, originally scheduled Sept. 19, will be shown at 3 p.m. Nov. 9. Information: 410-730-3987 Open-space cleanup set Oct. 25 in Wilde Lake Wilde Lake residents are invited to help clean open-space areas, street gutters and storm drains as part of Columbia Cleans Day on Oct. 25. Participants can pick up trash bags at Slayton House.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 7, 2003
The title doesn't speak for the audience: Viewers want all they can get of Eva in Deliver Us From Eva. This alternately amusing and irritating romantic comedy centers on Eva Dandridge (Gabrielle Union), the eldest of four sisters whose parents died in a car crash. She's acted as both mother and father to her siblings since they were teen-agers - and she continues to do so even after two of them marry and the third settles into a long-term relationship. Eva lays down edicts on everything from the right time to have babies to the perils of cohabitation, and thinks nothing of entering her sisters' homes - and bedrooms - without invitation.
NEWS
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff | December 24, 1995
"The Palm Beach Story" by Roxanne Pulitzer. Simon & Schuster. 256 pages. $22Roxanne Pulitzer doesn't need a book review, good or bad, to sell her books. "The Palm Beach Story," like any book about rich, shallow people having mind-blowing sex as they jockey for social position and money, will sell a copy or two. But shouldn't its eager buyers hope for better?Perhaps the most annoying offense of "The Palm Beach Story" is its not-so-subtle invocation of "The Philadelphia Story," although the similarity doesn't go far past the name.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 16, 2005
On a muggy late-summer night, any movie set in San Francisco, where the fog cools and drains the air and wipes it clean, is apt to feel refreshing. That goes even for a movie as fifth-hand as Just Like Heaven. This boy-meets-ghost-loses-ghost-gets-ghost story blends ingredients from every spectral romance ever made. But when the shaggy boy (Mark Ruffalo) and the well-coiffed ghost (Reese Witherspoon) bop up and down hills filled with seductive and eccentric cityscapes, the setting provides its own fairy-tale uplift.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2003
Before the Tampa Bay Buccaneers ever touched down in Philadelphia for the big game, there was the mind game. There were the Vet, the cold and the Eagles. Those three elements could spell psychological - and possibly physical - ruin for the Bucs in today's NFC championship game at frigid Veterans Stadium. Then again, given the mind-set of Bucs coach Jon Gruden, maybe they won't. It doesn't matter to Gruden that the Bucs have ended their previous two seasons with ugly playoff losses at the Vet. Or that they've lost four straight to the Eagles.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Here is what happened to Orioles starting pitcher Willis Roberts in last night's fourth inning against the Philadelphia Phillies. Home run. Double. Double. Single. Single. Double. Gone. Here is what happened to Orioles reliever John Parrish in the fifth inning. Fly ball. Double. Fly ball. Walk. Walk. Walk. Walk. Gone. Here is what happened to the Orioles' 3-0 first-inning lead. Ka-boom. Two nights after experiencing their most painful loss of the season by blowing a six-run, seventh-inning lead, the Orioles participated in their most unsightly one, a 15-7 loss before 18,710 at Veterans Stadium.
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