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By Stephen Wigler | October 5, 1995
The Philadelphia Orchestra's concert Wednesday in Meyerhoff Hall promises to be one of the great events of the current season. The orchestra is, of course, one of the six or seven greatest in the world and it has never sounded better than it does under its current music director, Wolfgang Sawallisch. Sawallisch will conduct the kind of program for which he achieved fame long ago: Richard Strauss' mighty "Ein Heldenleben" and Beethoven's Symphony No. 4.Meyerhoff Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are priced at $24-$56.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
The Philadelphia Orchestra has had its share of troubles over the years, including an embarrassing brush with bankruptcy, but things sure sound like they are looking up, way up, these days. Financial matters now seem more stable, and the hiring of a young dynamo from Montreal, Yannick Nezet-Seguin, as music director (this is his inaugural season) has sent a decidedly positive jolt into the organization. That electricity could be easily felt Wednesday night when the Philadelphians visited the Kennedy Center for a concert presented by the Washington Performing Arts Society . I'm still feeling a little tingly from the exposure.
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By Orlando Sentinel | May 7, 1992
The Philadelphia Orchestra Association slapped the Walt Disney Co. with a lawsuit yesterday, claiming it deserves half the $120-million videocassette profit from the animated classic "Fantasia."The Philadelphia Orchestra's "musical performance, name and likeness were used throughout the movie," the suit said, and "no contract or agreement" gives Disney the right to use its performance without compensation.The civil lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia. Besides half of "Fantasia''s estimated profit, the suit seeks unspecified punitive damages.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 26, 2010
Mary Ann Gottschall, a registered nurse and instructor, died March 11 of cancer at St. Agnes Hospital, where she had worked for more than three decades. The Columbia resident was 65. Miss Gottschall, the daughter of an anthracite coal miner and a homemaker, was born and raised in Branchdale, Pa., and Muddy Creek, Pa. She was a 1962 graduate of Blessed Virgin Mary High School in Pottsville, Pa., and moved to Baltimore, where she graduated in 1968 from the Bon Secours Hospital School of Nursing.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN CRITIC | October 12, 1995
Last night, for the second time in as many years, the Philadelphia Orchestra traveled to Meyerhoff Hall, this time bringing along its music director, Wolfgang Sawallisch. The program was unexceptional -- Beethoven's Fourth Symphony and Richard Strauss' "Ein Heldenleben," works that are the daily bread and butter of almost all orchestras and conductors.That there was nothing routine about the performances, however, says much about the excellences of the Philadelphia ensemble and even more about those of its music director.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Staff Writer | October 30, 1994
When the Philadelphia Orchestra returns to Meyerhoff Hall Tuesday after an absence of more than a decade, the occasion will mark the renewal of a long and passionate affair between Baltimore music lovers and one of the world's great orchestral ensembles.The Philadelphia Orchestra has played a unique role in the musical life of this city, nurturing, educating and expanding the artistic taste of its audiences. The orchestra raised performance standards in a city whose own local symphony for many years subsisted on a cultural level not much above that of a municipal band.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1996
PHILADELPHIA -- The Philadelphia Orchestra's most recent concert was Sunday, in Camden, N.J., a lead-gray town on the other side of the Delaware River. The mere prospect of such a lowly venue for this orchestra, familiar in Paris and Berlin, would have provoked a fit in Leopold Stokowski, the same in Eugene Ormandy.Luckily for both former conductors of the Philadelphia Orchestra, they are already dead.Their successors, Riccardo Muti and current music director Wolfgang Sawallisch, are committed to silence about the rancorous strike of the orchestra musicians.
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By David Donovan and David Donovan,Special to The Sun | November 4, 1994
The Philadelphia Orchestra returned to Baltimore Tuesday night to receive a thunderous standing ovation and three uproarious curtain calls for conductor Christoph Eschenbach after the triumphant conclusion of the finale of the Mahler Fifth Symphony.The last appearance here by this fabulous orchestra was on March 14, 1978, and one hopes that it won't take another 16 years to hear this world-class ensemble in the Meyerhoff again.This orchestra is one of the best in the list of great virtuoso ensembles.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 23, 2004
PHILADELPHIA - Applause broke out as soon as musicians of the Philadelphia Orchestra started filing onstage Tuesday night at the Kimmel Center, packed with dressy, champagne-lubricated patrons gathered to celebrate the opening of the season. Forty-eight hours earlier, it looked as if the players would be outside the theater, carrying picket signs. The sense of relief was palpable. A last-minute agreement averted a strike, when musicians and management extended the deadline on contract talks until Oct. 21 (saving the orchestra's nationally televised broadcast from Carnegie Hall Oct. 6)
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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 5, 1998
Not only has the Candlelight Concert Society assembled a distinguished roster of star ensembles and soloists to appear during its 26th season, but it has also managed to inject some local flavor into its cast of performers.When the Orfeo Chamber Players take the Smith Theatre stage at Howard Community College at 8 p.m. Saturday, one of the performers playing the music of Britten, Handel, Faure, Debussy, Bartok, Khachaturian and Dohnanyi will be violist Anna Marie Ahn Petersen.Petersen, a former resident of Owen Brown and graduate of Centennial High School, was hired by the prestigious Philadelphia Orchestra shortly after graduating from that city's Curtis Institute.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | January 10, 2010
Shea Scruggs remembers the day he first realized the full potential of the oboe. Freshly arrived at Philadelphia's Curtis Institute, he began his first lesson with Richard Woodhams, principal oboe of the Philadelphia Orchestra, by playing an etude. "Mr. Woodhams wasn't satisfied," Scruggs says. "He took my oboe and he just played it. And in that instant an entirely new world of sound just burst open. It convinced me that there was so much [in the oboe] that it would be worthwhile to keep studying, even if I never played a note after my last day at Curtis."
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | April 28, 2008
Had the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra performed its latest program on the other side of the Atlantic over the weekend, it might have found itself in severe legal trouble. Conductor Yan Pascal Tortelier encouraged the BSO to pump out the volume Friday night at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall to an extent that could have run afoul of European Union rules governing noise levels in the workplace, rules that have just been extended to the music and entertainment fields. (That's already causing some headaches - earaches, I guess - over there.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Tim Smith and Mary Carole McCauley and Tim Smith,sun reporters | March 12, 2008
The nation's premier stage plans to mount a three-week festival of the arts and culture of the Arab world next season - a programming decision with political overtones. The festival, called "Arabesque" and presented in cooperation with the League of Arab States, will be held at the Kennedy Center from Feb. 25 to March 15, 2009. There will be performances from 22 nations in dance, theater and music, including 12 premieres. Visual arts and fashion will also have a part. In recent years, the Kennedy Center has shone spotlights on the arts of Japan and China - but neither is a culture with whom the U.S. recently has been in conflict.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 13, 2006
WITH THE START OF THE classical music season only a few, sweltering weeks away, it's a great time to prepare for the sounds in store. I'm not talking hard work, though. Just a little summer school for the ears. Although lots of the 2006-2007 repertoire may be familiar and comfortable, there's also a fair amount that is bound to be new -- and possibly intimidating -- for many listeners. Getting over the hurdle in advance, rather than winging it at performance time, can mean the difference between boredom (or grouchiness)
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By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 21, 2006
Talk about your bells and whistles. With 6,938 pipes and 32 tons worth of structure and equipment, the $6.4 million organ unveiled at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts in Philadelphia can do just about anything. Outgun the Philadelphia Orchestra, for one. This baby can crank up the volume to bone-tingling effect. Don't be surprised if folks in Jersey start complaining about unexplained vibrations. The range of the sounds produced by this instrument is startling, too. It extends from the lowest possible note, which the organ builders jokingly describe as a "tuned helicopter," to the snazzy "bell star" - made up of 15 handbells struck by a rotating arm - located way up in the left corner of the huge facade of exposed pipes above the stage.
FEATURES
November 28, 2005
Tonight at 7:30, the Washington Performing Arts Society presents the Philadelphia Orchestra; Christoph Eschenbach directs; at the Kennedy Center Concert Hall, off Virginia and New Hampshire avenues N.W., Washington. Tickets are $40-$95. Call 800-444-1324.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 17, 2001
More than 90 years ago, folks in Philadelphia first started talking about the need to build a new home for the city's orchestra. Saturday night, the conversation finally shifted. Now it's, "How do you like our new hall?" That question was being asked repeatedly all weekend as the Philadelphia Orchestra took up residence in Verizon Hall at the $265 million Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts amid massive gala festivities that stretched over three days. The first night was a variety show starring Elton John (at a reported $2 million fee, paid for by Sidney Kimmel, the philanthropist with the mostest whose $30 million gift earned him the name on the center's door)
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