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By Lori Sears | November 7, 2002
If you like craft shows, the Philadelphia Museum of Art Craft Show is the place to be today through Sunday. Looking for ceramic goblets? Metal sculptures? Handmade jewelry? You'll find it all, as well as works in glass, wood, fiber, leather, paper and more, at the show, which takes place at the Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia. The show features contemporary American crafts by 190 top craft artists from 39 states, as well as works by 25 American Indian craft artists. Visitors can meet the artists, learn about the works, browse and purchase works.
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By Diane W. Stoneback, Tribune Newspapers | March 28, 2013
Mutter Museum may leave you shocked and horrified or amazed and fascinated. Either way, its collections of bones, bodies, body parts, plus tumors and other terrors, are unforgettable. The nation's finest and oldest medical museum - celebrating its 150th anniversary this month - bills itself as "disturbingly informative," and that is absolutely true. Specimens lining its wood-and-glass display cases reveal the effects of epidemics and diseases on the body, as well as an amazing array of human curiosities and anomalies.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | September 27, 1998
It is a scene of quiet after the roar of violence. The mob who stoned the saint to death is gone. Three people struggle to lift the lifeless body as a woman kneels and wipes blood from a step.One can imagine it on film, with only the sounds of the heavy breathing of those carrying the body and the slight scratching of cloth on stone. Although six people inhabit the picture, the silence and solitude of death permeate it.This little painting, "Saint Stephen Borne Away by His Disciples" (1862)
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By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
They may have strutted on a stage instead of a runway, but members of the Supremes were well known for their fashionable style. Over two decades of climbing the charts, the singing group performed in a variety of venues - including a performance in England where they met the Queen Mother - all while decked out in the most fabulous costumes. "Come See About Me: The Mary Wilson Supremes Collection," an exhibit featuring more than 30 of the group's glamorous and glittering gowns, is on display at the African American Museum in Philadelphia.
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March 22, 2009
cezanne and beyond Where:: Philadelphia Museum of Art, Benjamin Franklin Parkway at 26th Street When:: Now through May 17. Hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-8:45 p.m. Fridays. What:: Exhibit features more than 40 paintings, 20 watercolors and drawings by the French artist Paul Cezanne. His works are displayed alongside works by more than 15 artists for whom, it has been said, Cezanne was an inspiration, including Max Beckmann, Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso. How much: : Admission is $14; $12 for seniors; $10 for students; free for children 12 and younger.
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By JOHN DORSEY | May 10, 1998
The Philadelphia Museum of Art is now showing a small but significant exhibit of the work of early-15th-century Flemish painter Jan van Eyck. Called "Recognizing van Eyck," it brings together for the first time in 500 years two van Eyck paintings of "St. Francis Receiving the Stigmata," one owned by the Philadelphia Museum and the other by the Galleria Sabauda in Turin, Italy. Also among the show's seven paintings are two of van Eyck's most famous, "The Annunciation," lent by the National Gallery in Washington, and "Saint Barbara," lent by the Koninklijk Museum in Antwerp, Belgium, and never before seen in this country.
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By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | July 2, 2006
YOU CAN SEE WHY PEOPLE MIGHT have been afraid of Karl Kuerner. Technically, Kuerner is absent from "Groundhog Day," the 1959 painting by the great American master, Andrew Wyeth. In reality, the artwork, which is of Kuerner's kitchen and the view outside his window, is suffused with the presence of the former Pennsylvania farmer, who died in 1978. ANDREW WYETH: MEMORY AND MAGIC / / Through July 16 / / Philadelphia Museum of Art / / 215-235-7469
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | November 19, 2000
"There is soul and life in that crayon ... it knows what I want, it listens with intelligence and obeys." Thus wrote Vincent van Gogh to his brother, Theo, from The Hague in March of 1883, during a period in which he had immersed himself in portrait painting. Two years later, he wrote Theo that "what fascinates me much, much more than does anything else in my metier is the portrait. ... I should like to do portraits which will appear as revelations to people in 100 years time." Van Gogh's portraits, which rank among the most penetrating character studies in the history of art, are the subject of "Van Gogh: Face to Face," a major exhibition of 60 of the artist's paintings and drawings in the genre at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The show includes works from every stage in the artist's career, including the intense series of self-portraits Van Gogh made while living in Paris in 1886 and 1887, as well as his many portraits of friends and colleagues.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jarrett Graver | April 9, 1998
The real Van Eyck"Recognizing Van Eyck," at the Philadelphia Museum of Art through May 31, is a small exhibit that focuses on two nearly identical paintings thought to be done by the grandfather of oil painting, Dutch artist Joseph Van Eyck. The twin depictions, titled "Saint Francis of Assisi Receiving the Stigmata," will be seen in the context of a select group of seven works lent by several distinguished European and U.S. museums.The smaller of the two paintings, measuring less than five square inches, has been housed at the Philadelphia Museum of Art since 1933 and is considered one of its great treasures.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | November 6, 1997
Waterfowl cruiseClimb aboard the buyboat replica Mister Jim Saturday afternoon at the Chesapeake Maritime Museum in St. Michaels for a waterfowl cruise along the marshes of the Miles River. With the help of expert Jan Reese, visitors should be able to identify a variety of waterfowl, including Canada geese, canvasback ducks, scoots, mergansers, loons, shore birds and green and blue herons. Take field glasses; hot beverages will be provided.A second cruise is scheduled for Nov. 15.Weather permitting, the boat leaves the docks at the Maritime Museum on Mill Street at 1 p.m. and returns at 4 p.m. The cost is $20 for museum members and $25 for non-members.
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March 22, 2009
cezanne and beyond Where:: Philadelphia Museum of Art, Benjamin Franklin Parkway at 26th Street When:: Now through May 17. Hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-8:45 p.m. Fridays. What:: Exhibit features more than 40 paintings, 20 watercolors and drawings by the French artist Paul Cezanne. His works are displayed alongside works by more than 15 artists for whom, it has been said, Cezanne was an inspiration, including Max Beckmann, Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso. How much: : Admission is $14; $12 for seniors; $10 for students; free for children 12 and younger.
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By [ MIKE FARRELL] | October 21, 2007
Renoir Landscapes, now at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, comprises about 60 works from the early part of Pierre-Auguste Renoir's career. The French artist led the development of Impressionism. His robust and colorful works often captured people in intimate settings. The exhibit will be on display through Jan. 6 at the museum, 26th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Admission is $14 for adults; $12 for seniors; $10 for students with valid identification; and free for children younger than 12. The art museum is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday.
FEATURES
December 29, 2006
THE QUESTION Rocky Balboa, the latest entry in Sylvester Stallone's series about a Philadelphia boxer, came out this month, 30 years after the original movie. Of the six Rocky films, which is your favorite or least favorite and why? WHAT YOU SAY I have seen every one of the Rocky movies, but my favorite will always be the very first. Rocky realized he wanted to make something of his life, and his exultation at the top of the steps to the Philadelphia Museum of Art is a classic. Freda Garelick, Baltimore THE NEXT QUESTION The buzz- and glamour-rich Dreamgirls opened on Christmas to rave reviews and a strong box-office performance.
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By RICHARD P. CARPENTER and RICHARD P. CARPENTER,THE BOSTON GLOBE | August 13, 2006
You may know that Philadelphia is filled with history, fine dining and plenty of culture. But you may not be aware of the city's many outdoor opportunities - among them hiking, biking, rowing, fishing, sailing, running, horseback riding and even dog walking. To acquaint visitors with the possibilities, the city has launched a $1.7 million campaign called Boundless Philadelphia, with the details at gophila.com/outdoors. Such fresh-air fun adds one more reason to visit this nearby destination, where deals are easy to come by. Here are a few: You might want to lock in a low price for the Bed, Breakfast and Prison package at the Best Western Center City Hotel.
NEWS
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | July 2, 2006
YOU CAN SEE WHY PEOPLE MIGHT have been afraid of Karl Kuerner. Technically, Kuerner is absent from "Groundhog Day," the 1959 painting by the great American master, Andrew Wyeth. In reality, the artwork, which is of Kuerner's kitchen and the view outside his window, is suffused with the presence of the former Pennsylvania farmer, who died in 1978. ANDREW WYETH: MEMORY AND MAGIC / / Through July 16 / / Philadelphia Museum of Art / / 215-235-7469
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By Roberta Sandler and Roberta Sandler,Special to the Sun | March 14, 2004
One afternoon in 1959, I came home from high school to find my mother in tears. "I have bad news," she said. "Mario Lanza died today." I, too, burst into tears, mourning the end of the golden voice that had made Mario Lanza's movies so popular and that had crowned him as the Enrico Caruso of the 1950s. When he died in Rome, he was 38 years old. Flash forward to several months ago. I made my first visit to Philadelphia. There, I discovered not only the Mario Lanza Museum, but also the Mario Lanza Institute, Mario Lanza Park, Mario Lanza mural and Mario Lanza's birthplace.
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By [ MIKE FARRELL] | October 21, 2007
Renoir Landscapes, now at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, comprises about 60 works from the early part of Pierre-Auguste Renoir's career. The French artist led the development of Impressionism. His robust and colorful works often captured people in intimate settings. The exhibit will be on display through Jan. 6 at the museum, 26th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Admission is $14 for adults; $12 for seniors; $10 for students with valid identification; and free for children younger than 12. The art museum is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday.
NEWS
By Tom Infield and Tom Infield,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 29, 2004
PHILADELPHIA -- He still spends most of the year in Chadds Ford, Pa., the crossroads village where he was born in 1917 amid the far-off clamor of World War I. He still occasionally can be seen wandering the hills and watery meadows above the Brandywine River. And when the light is right, he still hastens to his easel in the old schoolhouse with those large, north-facing windows. At 86, and still perhaps America's best-loved artist, Andrew Wyeth is seeing his familiar, small world with new vision -- literally.
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