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NEWS
November 28, 2007
Believe it or not, Congress actually needs more people like Sen. Trent Lott, who announced his retirement Monday. The glib Mississippi Republican is a seersucker-loving Southerner whose conservative political views couldn't get him elected in Philadelphia to a seat on Traffic Court. But he brought a quality to Congress that more lawmakers need: He got things done. Few elected officials in the last 35 years have shown more flexibility than Mr. Lott to work with the opposing party. - The Philadelphia Inquirer
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SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Former Ravens cornerback Cary Williams didn't leave his disdain for the New England Patriots here in Baltimore when he drove up I-95 and signed with the Philadelphia Eagles. While explaining to the Philadelphia Inquirer why he wasn't thrilled with the Eagles' upcoming joint practices with New England, Williams said Friday that the Patriots are “cheaters.” “I give them all the credit in the world, but one fact remains: they haven't won a Super Bowl since they got caught,” Williams said, in reference to the Patriots “Spygate” scandal in 2007.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie | June 25, 2012
Speculation that Andres Alonso would leave the Baltimore City school CEO job for a new superintendent post has been rampant for years. Whenever an opening for the top job in an urban district appeared, Alonso's name seemed to be mentioned. He has always denied he was searching for a new job. When the Philly job came open, many education insiders insisted that Alonso was a strong contender. The Philadelphia Inquirer wrote today that the school system has announced the name of two finalists, and Alonso isn't one of them.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Richard Ben Cramer, a former Baltimore Sun reporter who later became a Pulitzer Prize-winning foreign correspondent for The Philadelphia Inquirer and an acclaimed author chronicling the lives of politicians and legendary sports figures, died Monday of lung cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Mr. Cramer, who was 62, lived in Chestertown. "Richard's work as a gifted writer and deeply principled journalist made our Republic a better place; made us a stronger, more compassionate, and more understanding people," Gov. Martin J. O'Malley, a friend, said in a statement released Tuesday.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 24, 1998
"The Shipbreakers," The Sun series that won a Pulitzer Prize on April 14 for investigative reporting, yesterday won the Overseas Press Club's Whitman Bassow Award for best foreign environmental reporting.The three-part series detailed the dangers to workers and the environmental hazards posed by the Navy's ship scrapping program at U.S. and overseas ports. It was written by reporters Will Englund and Gary Cohn and was accompanied by photographs by Perry Thorsvik.Other Overseas Press Club awards this year went to the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Philadelphia Inquirer and the Associated Press.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 6, 2000
PHILADELPHIA - Catholic parish lotteries have been shut down amid questions about their legality - a decision that met with disappointment and anger when it was announced July 30 in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. "People were upset it was coming to an end," said the Rev. Michael P. McCormac, who announced the suspension to parishioners of St. George Church in Glenolden, Pa. "They enjoyed it. Many felt it was a contribution to the church, it was helping the school, and they're disappointed it's not continuing."
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Former Ravens cornerback Cary Williams didn't leave his disdain for the New England Patriots here in Baltimore when he drove up I-95 and signed with the Philadelphia Eagles. While explaining to the Philadelphia Inquirer why he wasn't thrilled with the Eagles' upcoming joint practices with New England, Williams said Friday that the Patriots are “cheaters.” “I give them all the credit in the world, but one fact remains: they haven't won a Super Bowl since they got caught,” Williams said, in reference to the Patriots “Spygate” scandal in 2007.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun staff | April 30, 2010
Victor Abiamiri, the former Gilman standout and Baltimore Sun All-Metro Defensive Player of the Year in 2002, underwent microfracture knee surgery on Feb. 9 and might not be able to return to football activities until after training camp in August, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported Friday. The injury to Abiamiri, a 24-year-old defensive end for the Philadelphia Eagles, could leave his career in doubt. "It's a big injury," Eagles trainer Rick Burkhalter told the Inquirer. "It's knocked some guys out of playing, but plenty of people have come back and played, too. He's got youth on his side."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | June 8, 2007
Brian Tierney, who led a group that bought The Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News last year for $515 million, said he might bid for Dow Jones & Co., competing with Rupert Murdoch's $5 billion offer. In a statement, Tierney confirmed comments he made to The Wall Street Journal expressing interest in the New York-based company, publisher of Barron's and the Journal. Dow Jones' board put the company up for sale last week after the controlling Bancroft family agreed to consider Murdoch's offer and other possible bids.
SPORTS
By Mark Heisler | March 14, 2010
Midnight in Boston? Happily for the Celtics, it's not over when some writer says it's over, but rather when the clock strikes 12. Right now, it's only, say, 11:46 p.m. They have gone 18-18 since Christmas with recent losses to the lowly Nets at home and last week's back-to-back setbacks to the Bucks and Grizzlies. Not that losing by 20 to the Grizzlies was torture, but Celtics coach Doc Rivers called the two-minute warning "the only good message this entire game."
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | June 25, 2012
Speculation that Andres Alonso would leave the Baltimore City school CEO job for a new superintendent post has been rampant for years. Whenever an opening for the top job in an urban district appeared, Alonso's name seemed to be mentioned. He has always denied he was searching for a new job. When the Philly job came open, many education insiders insisted that Alonso was a strong contender. The Philadelphia Inquirer wrote today that the school system has announced the name of two finalists, and Alonso isn't one of them.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2011
He was a 15-year-old high school honors student in Ellicott City when federal prosecutors say he went online to solicit money for a woman who called herself "Jihad Jane" and "Fatima LaRose. " Authorities say that in Web postings two years ago, the youth "appealed for urgent funds" for the woman suspected of being a terrorist, whose real name is Colleen R. LaRose, 47, of Philadelphia. "I know the sister and by Allah, all money will be transferred to her," he allegedly wrote in a posting.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2010
Ann L. Showell, who with her husband developed and owned Ocean City's Castle In The Sand Hotel for more than 50 years, died Friday of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at her West Ocean City farm. She was 85. "Mrs. Showell was the last survivor from the glam era of old Ocean City. She came to town in the late 1940s and was an instant smash," said John M. Purnell, a longtime friend and retired Worcester County Times reporter who lives in West Ocean City. "She was a glamorous and posh lady who always lived well.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun staff | April 30, 2010
Victor Abiamiri, the former Gilman standout and Baltimore Sun All-Metro Defensive Player of the Year in 2002, underwent microfracture knee surgery on Feb. 9 and might not be able to return to football activities until after training camp in August, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported Friday. The injury to Abiamiri, a 24-year-old defensive end for the Philadelphia Eagles, could leave his career in doubt. "It's a big injury," Eagles trainer Rick Burkhalter told the Inquirer. "It's knocked some guys out of playing, but plenty of people have come back and played, too. He's got youth on his side."
SPORTS
By Mark Heisler | March 14, 2010
Midnight in Boston? Happily for the Celtics, it's not over when some writer says it's over, but rather when the clock strikes 12. Right now, it's only, say, 11:46 p.m. They have gone 18-18 since Christmas with recent losses to the lowly Nets at home and last week's back-to-back setbacks to the Bucks and Grizzlies. Not that losing by 20 to the Grizzlies was torture, but Celtics coach Doc Rivers called the two-minute warning "the only good message this entire game."
NEWS
November 28, 2007
Believe it or not, Congress actually needs more people like Sen. Trent Lott, who announced his retirement Monday. The glib Mississippi Republican is a seersucker-loving Southerner whose conservative political views couldn't get him elected in Philadelphia to a seat on Traffic Court. But he brought a quality to Congress that more lawmakers need: He got things done. Few elected officials in the last 35 years have shown more flexibility than Mr. Lott to work with the opposing party. - The Philadelphia Inquirer
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | August 18, 2005
PHILADELPHIA -- The caller knew he was on an island, but he tried, anyway. It was in between phone interviews with Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver Greg Lewis yesterday on WIP, the city's leading sports talk radio station. WIP had lost contact with Lewis, who had been talking about fellow wide receiver Terrell Owens' much-publicized return to training camp. So the hosts decided to hear from the public until they could get Lewis on the phone again. The first call came from a Phillies fan who said he felt like the only person in the city excited about the team's four-game series against the Washington Nationals.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | October 21, 2007
PHILADELPHIA -- A thickset man called "Earthquake" slips yellow cards into the open windows of passing motorists at 60th Street and Woodland Avenue. A tall man with movie-star good looks wedges a poster into the windshield of a city bus stopped at a traffic light. A man with a radio host voice calls for support over a portable microphone. The three are among a small army of men trying to energize this city's black community to put an end to the violence that is claiming lives in record numbers.
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