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Phil Rizzuto

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By George Vecsey and George Vecsey,New York Times News Service | March 12, 1993
NEW YORK -- The first twittering robin of spring arrived the other day, and made me eager for baseball, warm evenings with familiar voices chirping over the airwaves. The mail brought me the spring catalogue of the Ecco Press, a classy little publishing house in Hopewell, N.J.You do not read an Ecco catalogue; you peruse it. There was the latest collection of Joyce Carol Oates short stories, and not a moment too soon. There was Italo Calvino. There was Joseph Conrad. There was Dante. And there was Phil Rizzuto.
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By JOHN STEADMAN | April 11, 1999
What makes baseball the greatest game God gave man the opportunity to invent:Those golden memories, still so vivid in the theater of the mind, that no one can take away, of Hank Greenberg, Brooks Robinson and Mickey Mantle.It's where a father can be with his son, and explain how once, with his own father, he actually saw Dizzy and Daffy Dean on a cold October night at Oriole Park in 1934 -- making it sound as timely as yesterday, not yesteryear.Such distinctive nicknames. Pepper, Boog, Flea, Shanty, Mudcat, Stan The Man, Schoolboy, Rowdy and Rabbit.
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By New York Times News Service | August 21, 1995
NEW YORK -- Phil Rizzuto said yesterday that there was no way he would return to the broadcast booth to call New York Yankees games this year or next, sounding more resolved than when he resigned Friday."
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By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1996
Tommy Henrich read about it in an Arizona newspaper. Hank Bauer heard about it in Kansas City. Phil Rizzuto -- here for an Italian-Americans dinner -- told a local radio station that Orioles manager Davey Johnson was a "huckleberry" for even thinking about it.They don't agree with Johnson's proposed move of Cal Ripken from shortstop to third base, in part because they saw what happened 46 years ago to another hero.As New York Yankees teammates in 1950, Henrich, Bauer and Rizzuto were in the lineup the day Joe DiMaggio -- one of the most graceful center fielders of all time -- played first base.
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By New York Times News Service | August 24, 1995
NEW YORK -- With tears in his eyes and a paper coffee cup in one hand, Phil Rizzuto said yesterday that his retirement from WPIX-TV is not a bluff."This time you'd better believe me," he said at a Yankee Stadium news conference, where he called his own end to 39 years as a New York Yankees broadcaster. "I've called my last game."But Rizzuto, who will turn 78 next month, sounded deeply conflicted between staying and going, struggling to stick to his abrupt decision made last week after he missed Mickey Mantle's funeral.
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By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1996
Tommy Henrich read about it in an Arizona newspaper. Hank Bauer heard about it in Kansas City. Phil Rizzuto -- here for an Italian-Americans dinner -- told a local radio station that Orioles manager Davey Johnson was a "huckleberry" for even thinking about it.They don't agree with Johnson's proposed move of Cal Ripken from shortstop to third base, in part because they saw what happened 46 years ago to another hero.As New York Yankees teammates in 1950, Henrich, Bauer and Rizzuto were in the lineup the day Joe DiMaggio -- one of the most graceful center fielders of all time -- played first base.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | April 11, 1999
What makes baseball the greatest game God gave man the opportunity to invent:Those golden memories, still so vivid in the theater of the mind, that no one can take away, of Hank Greenberg, Brooks Robinson and Mickey Mantle.It's where a father can be with his son, and explain how once, with his own father, he actually saw Dizzy and Daffy Dean on a cold October night at Oriole Park in 1934 -- making it sound as timely as yesterday, not yesteryear.Such distinctive nicknames. Pepper, Boog, Flea, Shanty, Mudcat, Stan The Man, Schoolboy, Rowdy and Rabbit.
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By PHIL JACKMAN | August 28, 1995
News . . . but mostly views:The magazine Inside Sports obviously took the name seriously in its October issue (already?). It goes inside a prison in Indiana and has ex-quarterback Art Schlichter, who has been incarcerated for about 10 months now, author a piece on his seemingly never-ending gambling problems, which started here as a Baltimore Colts rookie in 1982.* Elsewhere on the gambling front, the folks who are trying to get unrestricted casino gambling approved for the state of Washington have made a brilliant move: Everyone who votes on the referendum in an upcoming election will get a dividend from 10 percent of the profits taken in by slot machines, an amount projected to be upward of $100.
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By Bob Ryan and Bob Ryan,Boston Globe | July 23, 1991
No baseball topic generates more thought and emotion than the subject of its pantheon, the Hall of Fame. This guy should be in. This guy should be out. There is no ultimate right or wrong. The best you can ask for is some logic.Rod Carew, Ferguson Jenkins, Gaylord Perry, Tony Lazzeri and Bill Veeck went in last weekend. Let them rest. Let their relatives and friends bask in the glory. We shall leave them alone for the time being and instead turn our attention to a dozen men worthy of someone's consideration.
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April 6, 2003
On deck Yogi Berra, Whitey Ford and Phil Rizzuto will throw out the first pitches for the Yankees' home opener tomorrow. He said it "There are certain steps along the way with a new team. A big step is getting the first win. Now I'm here, I feel like I'm a part of the team." Tom Glavine, Mets pitcher Who's hot Jim Thome of the Phillies has reached base safely in 60 straight games, the longest streak in the majors. Who's not The Tigers are the first team with back-to-back 0-5 starts since the 1992-1993 Royals.
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By PHIL JACKMAN | August 28, 1995
News . . . but mostly views:The magazine Inside Sports obviously took the name seriously in its October issue (already?). It goes inside a prison in Indiana and has ex-quarterback Art Schlichter, who has been incarcerated for about 10 months now, author a piece on his seemingly never-ending gambling problems, which started here as a Baltimore Colts rookie in 1982.* Elsewhere on the gambling front, the folks who are trying to get unrestricted casino gambling approved for the state of Washington have made a brilliant move: Everyone who votes on the referendum in an upcoming election will get a dividend from 10 percent of the profits taken in by slot machines, an amount projected to be upward of $100.
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By New York Times News Service | August 24, 1995
NEW YORK -- With tears in his eyes and a paper coffee cup in one hand, Phil Rizzuto said yesterday that his retirement from WPIX-TV is not a bluff."This time you'd better believe me," he said at a Yankee Stadium news conference, where he called his own end to 39 years as a New York Yankees broadcaster. "I've called my last game."But Rizzuto, who will turn 78 next month, sounded deeply conflicted between staying and going, struggling to stick to his abrupt decision made last week after he missed Mickey Mantle's funeral.
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By New York Times News Service | August 21, 1995
NEW YORK -- Phil Rizzuto said yesterday that there was no way he would return to the broadcast booth to call New York Yankees games this year or next, sounding more resolved than when he resigned Friday."
SPORTS
By George Vecsey and George Vecsey,New York Times News Service | March 12, 1993
NEW YORK -- The first twittering robin of spring arrived the other day, and made me eager for baseball, warm evenings with familiar voices chirping over the airwaves. The mail brought me the spring catalogue of the Ecco Press, a classy little publishing house in Hopewell, N.J.You do not read an Ecco catalogue; you peruse it. There was the latest collection of Joyce Carol Oates short stories, and not a moment too soon. There was Italo Calvino. There was Joseph Conrad. There was Dante. And there was Phil Rizzuto.
SPORTS
By Bob Ryan and Bob Ryan,Boston Globe | July 23, 1991
No baseball topic generates more thought and emotion than the subject of its pantheon, the Hall of Fame. This guy should be in. This guy should be out. There is no ultimate right or wrong. The best you can ask for is some logic.Rod Carew, Ferguson Jenkins, Gaylord Perry, Tony Lazzeri and Bill Veeck went in last weekend. Let them rest. Let their relatives and friends bask in the glory. We shall leave them alone for the time being and instead turn our attention to a dozen men worthy of someone's consideration.
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By Bill Ordine | August 19, 2007
After Phil Rizzuto died Monday night, we included in our modest tribute a couple of recordings of Rizzuto's. One was his call on Roger Maris' 61st home run. The other was his part in the rock classic Paradise by the Dashboard Light by Meat Loaf. There's a nifty story by Jeff Pearlman on ESPN.com about how the Rizzuto thing came together. A gem anecdote that has Phil written all over it was about how Rizzuto's agent, former Met Art Shamsky, wanted to clear up one matter before the Scooter agreed to do the studio work.
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July 28, 1994
In Cooperstown, N.Y., they couldn't care less whether there's a players strike. The Hall of Fame's induction ceremonies go on come rain, shine or collective-bargaining impasse. This weekend, baseball formally pays homage to the three latest inductees, pitcher Steve Carlton, shortstop-turned-broadcaster Phil Rizzuto and late manager Leo Durocher. Hall of Fame vice president Bill Guilfoile has witnessed induction ceremonies since 1979. He spoke recently with The Sun's Mark Hyman.Q: How many spectators are expected for the induction ceremonies?
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