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Phil Gramm

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NEWS
August 19, 1992
Here are excerpts from a speech delivered by Sen. Phil Gramm to the Republican National Convention last night.Never in history has the world experienced more dramatic changes in a shorter period of time than during the last four years.The Berlin Wall has come down; the people of Eastern Europe have been liberated; the Soviet Union, the evil empire that threatened our lives and our freedom for 45 years, exists today only in the pages of history books.One-hundred and thirty-two nations united behind our leadership to stop a tyrant in the Middle East.
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NEWS
By Paul Krugman | August 29, 2003
LAST WEEK a quietly scathing report by the inspector general of the Environmental Protection Agency confirmed what some have long suspected: In the aftermath of the World Trade Center's collapse, the agency systematically misled New Yorkers about the risks the resulting air pollution posed to their health. And it did so under pressure from the White House. The Bush administration has misled the public on many issues, from the budget outlook to the Iraqi threat. But this particular deception seems, at first sight, not just callous but gratuitous.
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NEWS
April 8, 1995
In 1984, Don Perkuchin was named manager of the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge in Dorchester County. That's dangerous assignment; they ought to give combat pay.It's not the duck hunters' errant shots you have to watch out for. It's the hunters' friends on Capitol Hill. Dorchester is a happy hunting ground for members of Congress and other influential Washingtonians.Mr. Perkuchin's sad tale has been chronicled in detail by Sun reporter Susan Baer. He no sooner arrived than he ordered his staff to begin strict law enforcement adjacent to the reserve.
NEWS
By Molly Ivins | May 12, 2002
AUSTIN, Texas - We seem to be having a hail of news that fails to amaze. Israel has been attacked by another suicide bomber. Ariel Sharon, so memorably described by President Bush as "a man of peace," had to rush home to continue his policy of tit-for-tat, which he has so brilliantly demonstrated does not work. Of course, Mr. Sharon is also demanding that Yasser Arafat Do Something about the terrorists. This adds an even more surreal element of black comedy to the tragedy. Assuming Mr. Arafat is not himself the head terrorist, as Mr. Sharon claims, with what, exactly, is he supposed to do about anything?
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | October 16, 1994
Sen. Phil Gramm, R-Texas, rode into Bel Air Tuesday afternoon as the brightest star in the Harford County Republican Central Committee's display of solidarity.Imitating national and state signing ceremonies, the county's GOP Central Committee had local candidates add their signatures to a "Republican Contract with the Citizens of Harford County."The ceremonial signing of the two-paragraph statement was held to let voters know that GOP candidates are "committed to individual liberty, economic opportunity and personal responsibility through limited and effective government."
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | April 13, 1995
MANCHESTER, N.H. -- The morning after Bob Dole signed "the pledge" promising not to raise income taxes, Phil Gramm was back in New Hampshire bright and early to trump his rival's ace. He would make "a stronger pledge," he told a Rotary Club breakfast in Derry. "I want to cut taxes."As a practical matter, all of the Republicans running for president -- including the Senate majority leader -- are falling over (x themselves to promise tax reduction.But the operative point is that this little bit of gamesmanship by Gramm is reflective of the place he has seized as the candidate defining the Far Right position among the Republicans with any realistic chance of being nominated.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | May 26, 1995
It's tempting. We rarely get so obvious a target as Phil Gramm, the Texas senator who wants to become president.Like most Republicans, Gramm is a champion of middle-class, grass-roots family values.But he's been blushing lately because it's come out that he once invested a few thousand dollars in the production of a soft-porn film.So it would be easy to needle Gramm about talking like a goody-goody after financially backing the sort of bare-bosom-and-butt movie that decent church folk condemn.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | July 28, 1995
GOP presidential candidate Sen. Phil Gramm of Texas is scheduled to speak at a fund-raiser for the Tri-District Republican Club of Carroll County next month.He will be the first major presidential candidate to visit the county since 1912, when Theodore Roosevelt stopped in Westminster, club President Carmen Amedori said yesterday."We're very excited about it," Ms. Amedori said. "People outside of local politics are beginning to realize Carroll County's effort."She said she hopes 600 people will attend the Aug. 31 "Victory in '96" dinner at Martin's Westminster.
FEATURES
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 24, 1995
Washington -- For once, Phil Gramm is silent. His piercing, blue eyes go blank behind rimless lenses. His hands rest on his Senate desk.He is pondering the central mystery of his career: How is it that so many people, his rivals and sometimes even his allies, have underestimated him?"
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1995
Texas Sen. Phil Gramm handily won a presidential straw poll yesterday in the first such survey of Republican activists from across Maryland this primary season.Mr. Gramm won the informal poll of 149 Republican State Central Committee members with 51 percent of the vote, almost a 2-1 margin over Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas, who remains the GOP front-runner in polls nationally and statewide.Mr. Dole placed second with 26 percent, while former Tennessee Gov. Lamar Alexander, who is struggling to make the Republican primary a three-man race, took 12 percent.
NEWS
By Matthew Buck | December 18, 2000
CONGRATULATIONS, Mr. President-elect. It's all over but for the shouting. And even that will fade. Now, down to work. This is the chance you've been waiting for. All-important eyes are on you. You must move quickly to make the bold show of unification you have been dying to make for nearly 40 days. You knew the election would be close; no one could have predicted it would be decided by one vote, in the conference room of the highest court of the land. But that's yesterday's news. What will be tomorrow's, Mr. President-elect?
NEWS
By Robert Reno | November 11, 1998
MOST OF the people who "lost" last week's election weren't even on the ballot.Offhand I'd said that a majority of pundits and about 100 percent of the scandal-wallowing TV news corps got creamed along with the bulk of the polling profession and a good portion of the corporate community, which spent the equivalent of a slow year's profits on electing a filibuster-proof Senate and a House of Representatives to match. Two conspicuous corporate losers were Bill Gates of Microsoft and Sandy Weill, co-czar of Citigroup.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 30, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Lawmakers of both parties joined in a celebration yesterday for the long-awaited legislation to balance the budget and cut taxes that President Clinton formally unveiled on the South Lawn of the White House.Flanked by liberal as well as conservative fellow Democrats, the president echoed Republican leaders in predicting that the legislation -- for two years the source of political strife -- would pass this week with wide majorities in both houses."After decades of deficits, we have put America's fiscal house in order again," Clinton declared.
NEWS
April 12, 1996
TRANSLATION from the Spanish: "Long live the people." People as opposed to politicians, incumbents, party bosses and big names with big feet.In a titillated Texas last Tuesday, just plain Democrats and just plain Republicans turned on their party Establishments in a display of contrariness right out of a movie script.Let's give star billing to the winner of the Senate Democratic primary. His name is Victor Morales, a civics teacher out of Poteet High School. Seems the kids in his class dared him to run for the United States Senate so he gassed up his white Nissan pick-up and drove around Texas quietly asking people to vote for him.Mr.
NEWS
By BOB SOMERBY | March 31, 1996
BECAUSE I DO political humor myself for a living -- and because I am concerned about rudeness in our civic life I made a point of taping the "shock jock" Don Imus in his recent talk to the TV and radio correspondents in D.C. And though I was certainly struck by his coarseness and rudeness, as a humorist I found myself struck by something else too.I was struck by how remarkably unfunny Mr. Imus had been -- by how strikingly witless a performance I had watched...
NEWS
March 3, 1996
This guide was prepared by the League of Women Voters. You may take this voters guide with you into the voting booth.The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan organization that works to promote political responsibility through the informed and active participation of citizens in their government. This guide is for the benefit of individual voters and should not be marked by organizations or other people.Material from this guide may not be reproduced in whole or in part without permission of the League of Women Voters.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1995
WASTING NO time getting back on the presidential campaign trail after his second-place showing in the Florida straw poll over the weekend, Texas Sen. Phil Gramm came to Cockeysville yesterday to open his Maryland campaign headquarters.Mr. Gramm used the results of the presidential preference poll in Orlando on Saturday to bolster his assertion that he had succeeded in making the run for the GOP nomination "a two-man race" with Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas.In the nonbinding contest, Mr. Gramm captured 26 percent of the more than 3,000 Republican activists voting, compared with a lukewarm 33 percent for Mr. Dole, the front-runner in polls.
NEWS
July 26, 1994
An article in the Business section Sunday incorrectly attributed a response to Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes' use of cartoons to criticize Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan. The response -- "You've certainly elevated the intellectual level of this debate" -- was made by Sen. Phil Gramm, R-Texas.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun national staff writer Paul West contributed to this article | February 19, 1996
MANCHESTER, N.H. -- Heading into tomorrow's presidential primary here with only the slimmest of leads, Sen. Bob Dole received the endorsement yesterday of former Republican candidate Phil Gramm.Mr. Gramm, the Texas senator who bowed out of the race after a dismal fifth-place showing in last week's Iowa caucuses, traveled to Manchester yesterday to throw his support behind his former rival and rejoin what remains a bitter campaign.Mr. Gramm said he was endorsing the Senate majority leader because he thought Mr. Dole was the only candidate who could bring together the party's economic and social conservatives, "and who can make the Republican party again one united party that is committed to beating Bill Clinton and is committed to changing America."
NEWS
February 8, 1996
PAT BUCHANAN'S smashing victory over Phil Gramm in Louisiana exposes deep ideological differences between social conservatives and economic conservatives in the Republican Party.As he heads for next week's all-candidate Iowa contest, Mr. Buchanan touts himself not only as a "conservative of the heart" but the "Huey Long of the Nineties." He is a populist, protectionist, isolationist, ultra-nationalist and an enthusiastic baiter of big business -- in other words the antithesis of Republican orthodoxy.
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