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By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 17, 1996
Do you think the new drugs being sold to control hunger can finally help me to lose weight?You are probably referring to so-called "Phen-Fen," two appetite suppressants that are indeed likely to help you to lose weight, when taken together. The bad news is that most people regain the lost weight after they stop taking the drugs. And there are some questions about their safety with long-term use."Phen" is an abbreviation for phentermine, while "Fen" stands for fenfluramine. The combination approach became popular when doctors recognized that smaller doses of both drugs taken together were more effective and produced fewer side effects than larger doses of either one taken alone.
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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Peter.Schmuck@baltsun.com | July 3, 2009
N ews item: The Ravens are installing natural sod at M&T Bank Stadium for the big July 24 soccer game between AC Milan and Chelsea. My take: Natural grass in an NFL stadium? Why don't we just join the European Union and get it over with? Related news item: The euro, based on Thursday's exchange rate, is worth $1.39 (U.S.). My take: That means you would be able to get a 24-ounce beer at M&T Bank Stadium for just five euros. Sweet! Bonus take: Of course, with the value-added tax, it'll end up being the equivalent of $10 (U.S.
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NEWS
By JOE GRAEDON AND TERESA GRAEDON | April 28, 2006
I am addicted to the diet pill phentermine. I have been abusing this medication for 10 years, usually taking 10 pills a day. I have called a couple of clinics to try to get help, but the people I have spoken to act like this is not a real drug addiction. Is there any place that specializes in this kind of problem? Phentermine (Adipex-P, Ionamin) is a weight-loss medicine similar to amphetamine. It was the "phen" in the now-infamous fen-phen diet pill combination. According to the official label information: "Amphetamines and related stimulant drugs have been extensively abused.
NEWS
By JOE GRAEDON AND TERESA GRAEDON | April 28, 2006
I am addicted to the diet pill phentermine. I have been abusing this medication for 10 years, usually taking 10 pills a day. I have called a couple of clinics to try to get help, but the people I have spoken to act like this is not a real drug addiction. Is there any place that specializes in this kind of problem? Phentermine (Adipex-P, Ionamin) is a weight-loss medicine similar to amphetamine. It was the "phen" in the now-infamous fen-phen diet pill combination. According to the official label information: "Amphetamines and related stimulant drugs have been extensively abused.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2005
An ordinary diet doctor or an illegal drug dealer? That question should take center stage in federal court today when a once-prominent Towson physician is scheduled to go on trial on charges that he illegally manufactured the club drug Ecstasy. Prosecutors are expected to expose the alleged double life of Robert M. Keenan, 45, affectionately known to his patients as "Dr. Bob," a physician who made his name promoting pills as the key to weight loss and now stands accused of peddling illegal substances.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D. and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN King Features Syndicate | November 11, 1997
I lost about 40 pounds this past year while taking fen-phen. I stopped taking these diet pills right after the scary headlines and the recall. Since then I have gained back about 12 pounds and it is getting me down.It is my understanding that only the "fen" part of this combination was recalled. When I asked my doctor to renew my prescription for Ionamin (phentermine) he was reluctant. What's the problem? I never experienced any side effects while taking fen-phen.Your physician may be nervous.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2005
The so-called chemist for a weight-loss doctor appeared in federal court yesterday and admitted his role in an illegal drug manufacturing operation that produced the club drug Ecstasy, prosecutors said. In U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Gerard G. Galvez, 37, pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to manufacture Ecstasy for cooking up millions of dollars' worth of the illegal drug. The maximum sentence for the crime is 20 years in prison. It was unclear how yesterday's plea would affect the case against Dr. Robert M. Keenan, 45, who ran Elite Weight Management Center in Towson.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | October 18, 1997
Four people filed a class-action suit in U.S. District Court in Baltimore yesterday against the makers of three controversial weight-loss drugs they allege put them at risk for heart and lung conditions.Georgiana Donlin of Whiteford, Robert Patro of Elkton, Barry Steeley of Woodstock and Julie Watson of Timonium sued 12 drug companies seeking payment for continued medical monitoring for ailments they allege can be caused by the drugs fenfluramine and phentermine -- together called fen-phen -- and dexfenfluramine, also known as Redux.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | January 10, 1995
OK, we admit it. We overate, just like millions of other people. Holiday treats were too enticing.Now there are other temptations. The diet pill industry is cranking up to convince us there is a quick fix for those additional calories. Soon ads will appear in supermarket tabloids and our mail box encouraging us to fire up our fat-burning cellular machinery so we can shed pounds overnight while we sleep.Who doesn't want increased energy and enhanced metabolism? Effortless weight loss that involves no dietary deprivation or strenuous exercise is a never-ending American dream.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Peter.Schmuck@baltsun.com | July 3, 2009
N ews item: The Ravens are installing natural sod at M&T Bank Stadium for the big July 24 soccer game between AC Milan and Chelsea. My take: Natural grass in an NFL stadium? Why don't we just join the European Union and get it over with? Related news item: The euro, based on Thursday's exchange rate, is worth $1.39 (U.S.). My take: That means you would be able to get a 24-ounce beer at M&T Bank Stadium for just five euros. Sweet! Bonus take: Of course, with the value-added tax, it'll end up being the equivalent of $10 (U.S.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2005
An ordinary diet doctor or an illegal drug dealer? That question should take center stage in federal court today when a once-prominent Towson physician is scheduled to go on trial on charges that he illegally manufactured the club drug Ecstasy. Prosecutors are expected to expose the alleged double life of Robert M. Keenan, 45, affectionately known to his patients as "Dr. Bob," a physician who made his name promoting pills as the key to weight loss and now stands accused of peddling illegal substances.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2005
The so-called chemist for a weight-loss doctor appeared in federal court yesterday and admitted his role in an illegal drug manufacturing operation that produced the club drug Ecstasy, prosecutors said. In U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Gerard G. Galvez, 37, pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to manufacture Ecstasy for cooking up millions of dollars' worth of the illegal drug. The maximum sentence for the crime is 20 years in prison. It was unclear how yesterday's plea would affect the case against Dr. Robert M. Keenan, 45, who ran Elite Weight Management Center in Towson.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2001
Pietr Hitzig once called himself "the father of fen-phen" and was known nationally as a vocal proponent of the drug therapy that he claimed could not only help people lose weight but also cure other ills, ranging from drug addiction to gulf war syndrome. The Timonium doctor drew attention for one other claim, as well. Hitzig said he didn't need to see patients in person or administer physical exams before prescribing drugs, and he set up a booming online business that he described as a progressive "telemedicine" practice but that federal authorities said put patients at risk.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D. and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN King Features Syndicate | November 11, 1997
I lost about 40 pounds this past year while taking fen-phen. I stopped taking these diet pills right after the scary headlines and the recall. Since then I have gained back about 12 pounds and it is getting me down.It is my understanding that only the "fen" part of this combination was recalled. When I asked my doctor to renew my prescription for Ionamin (phentermine) he was reluctant. What's the problem? I never experienced any side effects while taking fen-phen.Your physician may be nervous.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | October 18, 1997
Four people filed a class-action suit in U.S. District Court in Baltimore yesterday against the makers of three controversial weight-loss drugs they allege put them at risk for heart and lung conditions.Georgiana Donlin of Whiteford, Robert Patro of Elkton, Barry Steeley of Woodstock and Julie Watson of Timonium sued 12 drug companies seeking payment for continued medical monitoring for ailments they allege can be caused by the drugs fenfluramine and phentermine -- together called fen-phen -- and dexfenfluramine, also known as Redux.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 17, 1996
Do you think the new drugs being sold to control hunger can finally help me to lose weight?You are probably referring to so-called "Phen-Fen," two appetite suppressants that are indeed likely to help you to lose weight, when taken together. The bad news is that most people regain the lost weight after they stop taking the drugs. And there are some questions about their safety with long-term use."Phen" is an abbreviation for phentermine, while "Fen" stands for fenfluramine. The combination approach became popular when doctors recognized that smaller doses of both drugs taken together were more effective and produced fewer side effects than larger doses of either one taken alone.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2001
Pietr Hitzig once called himself "the father of fen-phen" and was known nationally as a vocal proponent of the drug therapy that he claimed could not only help people lose weight but also cure other ills, ranging from drug addiction to gulf war syndrome. The Timonium doctor drew attention for one other claim, as well. Hitzig said he didn't need to see patients in person or administer physical exams before prescribing drugs, and he set up a booming online business that he described as a progressive "telemedicine" practice but that federal authorities said put patients at risk.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | July 3, 1995
Decades after their quiet entry as appetite suppressants, two drugs that adjust the brain's natural chemistry are attracting hundreds of patients who are lured by testimonials that daily doses can halt addictions and a multitide of ills.The drugs' chief proponent, Dr. Pietr Hitzig of Timonium, claims overwhelming success with more than 1,800 patients suffering from conditions as diverse as cocaine addiction, alcoholism, Tourette's syndrome, bulimia, chronic fatigue, chemical sensitivity, hay fever, hives, phobias and obesity.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | July 3, 1995
Decades after their quiet entry as appetite suppressants, two drugs that adjust the brain's natural chemistry are attracting hundreds of patients who are lured by testimonials that daily doses can halt addictions and a multitide of ills.The drugs' chief proponent, Dr. Pietr Hitzig of Timonium, claims overwhelming success with more than 1,800 patients suffering from conditions as diverse as cocaine addiction, alcoholism, Tourette's syndrome, bulimia, chronic fatigue, chemical sensitivity, hay fever, hives, phobias and obesity.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | January 10, 1995
OK, we admit it. We overate, just like millions of other people. Holiday treats were too enticing.Now there are other temptations. The diet pill industry is cranking up to convince us there is a quick fix for those additional calories. Soon ads will appear in supermarket tabloids and our mail box encouraging us to fire up our fat-burning cellular machinery so we can shed pounds overnight while we sleep.Who doesn't want increased energy and enhanced metabolism? Effortless weight loss that involves no dietary deprivation or strenuous exercise is a never-ending American dream.
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