Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPhenomenon
IN THE NEWS

Phenomenon

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | May 12, 1991
A . M. Chaplin's cover story on political correctness is the result of one of those rare cases of editor and writer coming up with the same story idea at the same staff meeting. Both of us had gotten interested in the fact that the perception of political correctness -- the current campus orthodoxy on matters of race, gender and class -- had undergone some kind of significant change.The popularity of the somewhat affectionate but mostly contemptuous abbreviation "P.C." suggests that awareness of the phenomenon has become widespread -- and that it's now open to criticism from quarters where it had once been sacrosanct.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 30, 2013
Here's the latest attack on health care reform in a nutshell: In recent weeks, health insurance companies are sending out hundreds of thousands of letters of policy cancellation. Isn't that a direct contradiction to President Barack Obama's repeated pledge that Americans would not lose their coverage as a result of the Affordable Care Act? Of course, Republicans and their allies don't express that concern so politely. They point it out with outrage, indignation and venom - and quite a few did so repeatedly to Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius in her appearance Wednesday before the House Energy and Commerce Committee.
Advertisement
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- What's been said about the weather -- that everybody talks about it but nobody does anything about it -- could be said right now about the Ross Perot phenomenon and the reaction of the George Bush and Bill Clinton campaigns.For weeks now, Perot has energetically blotted out the sun of publicity for the presumptive Republican and Democratic presidential candidates by popping up on television with more frequency than Jay Leno, and by continuing to give newspaper interviews while contending he is busy doing his homework.
NEWS
October 23, 2013
The hookah lounge, a staple of Middle Eastern culture, has now gained a foothold in American culture, drawing the attention of legislators and health advocates across the country worried about the impact of these purveyors of a new type of tobacco smoking. Typically, the patrons are young adults and college students. What attracts them to these smoking bars is not just to puff on sweetened tobacco from an ornate water pipe, but to relax with friends and, frequently, to drink alcohol they bring in themselves.
NEWS
By Jack Germond And Jules Witcover | March 27, 1992
MILWAUKEE -- Whether it's by calculation or just plain orneriness, Democrats seem to like punishing their presidential front-runners, or at least making them sweat a bit before finally anointing them as their party's nominees.Gov. Bill Clinton is experiencing the discomfort now after his narrow defeat by former Gov.Jerry brown in the Connecticut primary.And Brown enthusiasts in Wisconsin and in New York are hoping to administer another dose of the same medicine to him on April 7.As far back as 20 years ago, front-runner George McGovern got a taste of it when Democrats less liberal than himself threw their support behind Hubert Humphrey in what was then known as ABM. Those initials were commonly used at that time as the abbreviation for anti-ballistic missile, but in this case they meant Anybody But McGovern.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1997
PHILADELPHIA -- A man who builds a show around himself and calls it "Lord of the Dance" is not shy.But what's surprising about Michael Flatley, who comes off as arrogant and obnoxious in even the most sycophantic magazine profiles, is how self-effacing he manages to be in the midst of all the hype.On the best-selling video of "Lord of the Dance" and in the show itself, which will play Aug. 30-31 at the Baltimore Arena, Flatley is larger than life: erupting onstage in a firestorm of steps, strutting off to thunderous applause, returning with an unfeigned smile of joy to bask in the applause.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | August 16, 2009
Two Baltimore cousins were sentenced to prison last week for their roles in an armed robbery at a Chinese restaurant that became an Internet phenomenon last year when a video that showed witnesses laughing was posted on YouTube. David Jefferson, 17, of the 2700 block of Tivoly Ave., and Kevin Johnson, 15, of the same address, were sentenced to 25 years after pleading guilty to second-degree attempted murder and other charges in the August 2008 robbery at the Chinese Cuisine Carryout at 2700 Harford Road.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,paul.west@baltsun.com | January 18, 2009
Washington - Barack Hussein Obama will complete a remarkable breakthrough when he is sworn into office on Tuesday. As the first African-American president, he will immediately, and forever, stand apart from the 42 white men who preceded him. But his significance goes beyond that indelible achievement. Obama will also become America's first global president, taking charge under the shadow of what he calls "the worst recession since the Great Depression," a worldwide contagion with no end in sight.
NEWS
By Bryn Nelson and Bryn Nelson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 2002
Scientists have recorded the clearest video image yet of the elusive blue jet, a spectacular flash sometimes observed zipping above thunderstorm clouds by airline passengers and pilots. This brilliant phenomenon, scientists say, may provide a previously unrecognized electrical bridge between clouds and the charged layer of the upper atmosphere, or ionosphere. After studying the phenomenon for seven years, Pennsylvania State University electrical engineer Victor Pasko said he was "very excited" finally to see one with his own eyes from the roof of an observatory in Puerto Rico in September.
NEWS
By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,BOSTON GLOBE | March 30, 1997
The massive Howard Stern media blitz is over, leaving in its wake remnant thoughts about what New Yorker writer David Remnick cleverly calls "over-the-counter counterculture," or the mainstreaming of edginess. Does a pop phenomenon -- Howard Stern, alternative rock, Courtney Love, the nodding-out-on-heroin look, "independent" movie-making -- remain edgy once it has been mass-packaged and presold? And if a healthy, lip-jobbed Courtney Love is making Oscar presentations, and Howard Stern has topped the box-office list, who will become the new rebels?
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
It has been a year since the climate pattern known as La Nina ended, the longest period of so-called "neutral" conditions since 2004. And there is no sign of the phenomenon, or its counterpart El Nino, through summer, climate forecasters say. La Nina, known for bringing mild winters to the mid-Atlantic, was last active from August 2011 through April 2012. The phenomenon is marked by warmer-than-average Pacific Ocean surface temperatures around the equator. But since May of last year, those water temperatures have been in "neutral" territory, too cool for a La Nina but not cold enough for El Nino.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2012
When Venus passed between Earth and the sun 251 years ago Tuesday, scientists scribbled down observations that helped calculate a rough estimate of the size of our solar system. Using crude telescopes, they watched the yellow planet move across the sun's face as a tiny black disk. There is little more the same rare phenomenon, known as a transit of Venus, will reveal about our closest neighbors in space when it occurs again Tuesday. But astronomers will be watching nonetheless, hoping it will teach them to better discover and investigate planets that are much farther away and could sustain life.
EXPLORE
By Loni Ingraham and Pat van den Beemt | August 25, 2011
Don Gerding of Rodgers Forge couldn't believe it when he heard the news that former Orioles pitcher Mike Flanagan had died. "It was upsetting," he said. Gerding worked with the former Oriole pitcher the 1970s and 80s, when Flanagan did some rep work in the printing and engraving business for Dempsey & Carroll while he was still pitching at Memorial Stadium. "He was a 33rd Street phenomenon," Gerding said. Flanagan, a Cy Young Award winner who became a television announcer and top executive with the club, died from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound Wednesday afternoon on his property in Sparks, according to sources with knowledge of the investigation into his death.
NEWS
July 11, 2010
The high-pressure system that has roasted much of the Northeast in recent days brought with it other unpleasant summer visitors: soot and smog. For most of the week, a "Code Orange" alert has been in effect in Maryland as seniors, young children and those with health issues such as asthma that might make them sensitive to polluted air have been advised to stay indoors. That's because such pollution, known as ground-level ozone — formed when sunlight interacts with certain emissions (chiefly from cars and electric-power generating plants)
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | August 16, 2009
Two Baltimore cousins were sentenced to prison last week for their roles in an armed robbery at a Chinese restaurant that became an Internet phenomenon last year when a video that showed witnesses laughing was posted on YouTube. David Jefferson, 17, of the 2700 block of Tivoly Ave., and Kevin Johnson, 15, of the same address, were sentenced to 25 years after pleading guilty to second-degree attempted murder and other charges in the August 2008 robbery at the Chinese Cuisine Carryout at 2700 Harford Road.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,paul.west@baltsun.com | January 18, 2009
Washington - Barack Hussein Obama will complete a remarkable breakthrough when he is sworn into office on Tuesday. As the first African-American president, he will immediately, and forever, stand apart from the 42 white men who preceded him. But his significance goes beyond that indelible achievement. Obama will also become America's first global president, taking charge under the shadow of what he calls "the worst recession since the Great Depression," a worldwide contagion with no end in sight.
TRAVEL
October 2, 2005
My husband and I witnessed this beautiful sunset in Montego Bay, Jamaica, this spring. As you can see, there were other fascinated people watching this daily phenomenon. Kathy Crews Cockeysville
NEWS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,Sun reporter | August 15, 2008
BEIJING - Michael Phelps touched the wall today, looked up at the scoreboard to find his time, then closed his eyes. He winced in pain, needing a moment to collect himself. This one hurt. It also felt pretty darn good. Phelps won his sixth gold medal of the 2008 Olympics, and set his sixth world record in as many events, cruising home in 1 minute, 54.23 seconds to win the 200-meter individual medley. He is now just one gold medal away from matching Mark Spitz's record of seven, set at the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, Germany, and has two events remaining: the 100-meter butterfly and the 400-meter individual medley.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | February 6, 2008
meatpaper.com The online version of the new journal Meatpaper is about meat "as a provocative cultural symbol and phenomenon," write the editors. You can read articles on kosher animal slaughter and on an artist who has made a map of the world out of Spam.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.