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Phelps Luck

NEWS
By JEFF SEIDEL and JEFF SEIDEL,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 2, 2006
Brooks Whiteford scurried around the Phelps Luck pool, talking to a seemingly endless mix of swimmers, parents, coaches and officials. Wearing an eye-catching tie-dyed red T-shirt, the Phelps Luck head swim coach worked especially hard to keep his swimmers aware of what was happening and ready for their next race. But on this hot Saturday morning during the All-City Championship Meet, Whiteford could not do it alone. The 20-year-old Columbia resident found his assistant coach and went over some lineup changes.
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NEWS
By Lisa Tom . and Lisa Tom .,special to the sun | July 18, 2007
Tristan Hinman, 12, usually races across the pool in Columbia Neighborhood Swim League meets. But Saturday, Tristan had all night to swim laps. He and more than 50 Phelps Luck Snappers swam for pledges and donations to the Special Olympics aquatics program in an overnight Swim Mania at Phelps Luck pool. "I think it's a good idea because they should have a chance to swim, too," Tristan said. While every CNSL team holds a charity event, the Snappers have formed a bond with the Special Olympics athletes, who swim with the Snappers every year at Swim Mania.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 12, 2004
At Phelps Luck Elementary School in Columbia, staff members are making sure pupils understand the meaning behind a popular saying: People don't plan to fail, but fail to plan. Through its Goal Getters program, the youngsters are learning an early lesson about the importance of setting goals to achieve their dreams. "We're very honest with the students," said Tricia McCarthy, a Phelps Luck guidance counselor who started the program last year with summer school children. "We want them to improve, achieve and accelerate, and we tell them you've got to plan; you've got to set goals."
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 19, 2006
To qualify for a $1,000 Carson Scholar prize, Gloria O'Koth, a fifth-grader at Phelps Luck Elementary School had to have a grade point average of at least 3.75, had to be involved in her community and had to write an essay about a hero in her life. Her teacher, Toni Sommerville, thought she would choose a sports figure or celebrity. Her mother, Atieno Anyango, suggested she write about Nelson Mandela or the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. But Gloria instead chose to write about her mother.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2003
With less than a week before the first day of classes, principals at Phelps Luck and Bryant Woods elementaries in Columbia were stunned to find out that they will have to allow pupils to transfer to schools with better scores under a provision in the federal No Child Left Behind legislation. "My understanding is that we're not sending [the transfer] information out until after the school year starts," said Phelps Luck's principal, John Morningstar, who learned Friday that his school and Bryant Woods were still on the transfer list.
NEWS
March 8, 1995
POLICE LOG* Long Reach: 5300 block of Phelps Luck Drive: Someone kicked open several doors in an office building and took cash Saturday morning, police said.
NEWS
September 27, 1995
A community column in yesterday's edition of The Sun for Howard County gave an incorrect location for Phelps Luck Elementary School. The school is in Columbia's Long Reach village.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
December 5, 1995
Police logLong Reach: 5300 block of Old Stone Court: Someone broke a window at Phelps Luck Elementary School Saturday, but police were not sure if anything had been taken.
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