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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 3, 2006
It's a new year, but Elmer Klavens marks it in the old manner. He gets up each day, and he gets himself to work. You can find him several days a week at the Chestnut Pharmacy, on 36th Street in Hampden. A few years ago, Klavens did the math and figured he had filled about 1 million prescriptions over his lifetime. He has been a pharmacist for three-quarters of a century. As he goes to work this week, he is 94 years old. He has three children who marvel at their father. There is the musician, Clay; the schoolteacher, Bobbie; and the optometrist, Andy.
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NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 21, 2005
CHICAGO - The American Medical Association voted yesterday to put its weight behind legislative initiatives around the United States requiring pharmacies to fill legally valid prescriptions in the wake of recently publicized refusals by pharmacists opposed to dispensing morning-after contraception. If the pharmacist has objections, pharmacies should provide for an "immediate referral to an appropriate alternative dispensing pharmacy without interference," according to the resolution passed by the group's policymaking House of Delegates.
NEWS
By Tonya Maxwell and Tonya Maxwell,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 27, 2005
In a tiny laboratory in Germany, an obscure young pharmacist's apprentice managed to concentrate the power of poppies into crystals that could control coughs, ease pain and tease users into a pleasant slumber. Friedrich Sertuerner, 22, published a paper announcing his discovery in 1805. He was ignored. So he went back to his experiments, injecting dogs with the drug he had extracted from opium and doping himself and his buddies. A dozen years later he published again, this time naming his discovery after Morpheus, the Greek god of dreams.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 24, 2005
WASHINGTON - Let's say you join the Army. You go through basic training and are sent to Iraq. One day, your unit comes under fire. Everybody shoots back except you. When your commanding officer demands to know why, you explain that as a Christian, you have moral objections to killing people. I'd wager most of us would think you a couple companies short of a full battalion. If you agree, then you're going to love - by which I mean, hate - what's happening with your local pharmacist. Well, maybe not your personal pharmacist.
NEWS
By Blanca Torres | March 30, 2005
Dixie Leikach Pharmacist and pharmacy owner; Finksburg Pharmacy, Finksburg Age: 35 Years in business: 12, the past year and a half as a pharmacy owner. Salary: $100,000 before taxes. The median salary is $94,434 for a pharmacist in Baltimore, according to Salary.com. How she started: Her mother first suggested pharmacy as a career. She researched the field to earn a Girl Scout badge and realized that she liked it. She completed two years of pre-pharmacy studies at Salisbury University and worked at a pharmacy part time.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2005
In a close vote, the Senate defeated a bill yesterday that would have permitted pharmacists to dispense so-called "morning-after" emergency contraception without a prescription. After lengthy testimony, the 21-25 vote shocked sponsor Sharon M. Grosfeld, a Montgomery County Democrat. Two sponsors of the bill - Democrats Gloria G. Lawlah of Prince George's and Edward J. Kasemeyer of Howard County - cast dissenting votes. "I'm very disappointed," Grosfeld said. "It was a total shock. I think that maybe some senators were concerned about the right-wing movement in their district and were concerned about their own re-elections."
NEWS
March 11, 2005
David P. Tenberg, a retired Baltimore pharmacist and animal lover, died Sunday at College Manor in Lutherville of complications from a fall he suffered several years ago. He was 90. Mr. Tenberg was born in Baltimore, the son of Russian immigrant parents, and was raised in the Park Heights and Pimlico neighborhoods. He graduated from City College in 1932 and from the University of Maryland Pharmacy School in 1936. Mr. Tenberg, a longtime Park Heights resident who had lived in the Lutherville retirement home since 2002, retired from the White Cross Pharmacy in 1980.
NEWS
February 1, 2005
2 from Mount Airy charged with theft of prescription drugs Carroll County sheriff's deputies arrested a Mount Airy man and woman Sunday on charges related to the alleged theft of OxyContin and other prescription drugs from the pharmacy where one of them was employed. Authorities said Tiffany Lind Reese, 19, of Woodville Road and Kevin Lee Adkins, 25, of Boyers Mill Road were charged with the theft of OxyContin from the Rite Aid Pharmacy in the 400 block of E. Ridgeville Road in Mount Airy, possession of the drug, and conspiracy.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 28, 2004
PHILADELPHIA - Federal officials in Philadelphia charged three pharmacists and two doctors yesterday with illegally selling hundreds of thousands of pills, including popular medications Prilosec, Celebrex and Prozac, that had been handed out as promotional free samples by drug companies. The samples were sold in retail pharmacies in Philadelphia and Montgomery County, Pa., federal prosecutors say. Four other individuals - two of them drug company representatives - were charged this year in federal court in Philadelphia with selling drug samples for cash.
NEWS
December 15, 2004
William Weiner, a retired pharmacist who managed a Read's drug store in downtown Baltimore, died of a heart attack Dec. 8 at Sinai Hospital. The Pikesville resident was 82. Born in Baltimore and raised on Luzerne Avenue, he was a 1940 graduate of Patterson Park High School, where he won the Best Male Student award. After earning a degree from the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, he served in the Army during World War II as a pharmacist in the Pacific. After the war, he became a retail pharmacist and rose within Read Drug and Chemical to become a manager of its store at Howard and Lexington streets.
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