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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2010
Consolidated Pharmaceutical Group and its owner agreed Monday to pay $250,000 in fines, never again own a business in Maryland and sell its long-dormant Brooklyn Park penicillin-making site as part of a plea to criminal charges stemming from abandoning the plant, where officials said acids and toxic chemicals were leaking. When the company ceased production in 1999, it "shut the door and just left," said Michelle Barnes, an assistant attorney general. But the plant still held more than 50,000 gallons of hazardous chemicals, including some that, under certain conditions, could have combined into deadly cyanide gas, she said, adding that "the danger to the community was significant."
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NEWS
March 22, 2010
If the federal government really wants to help American citizens get affordable health care, why not regulate the pharmaceutical companies so that people can get the medicine they need without taking out a second mortgage? Oh, yeah -- I forgot -- that would involve lowering the income of multi-billion dollar corporations. Silly me!! Tony Seitz, Glen Burnie
NEWS
November 13, 2008
Your editorial "Protecting pharmaceuticals" (Nov. 7) omits two important facts about the case before the Supreme Court and proposes policy changes that are both ill-considered and ultimately harmful to patients. The editorial neglects to mention that the method of administration of the drug in question had risks that were disclosed to the Food and Drug Administration and specifically stated in warnings that came with the drug. Those warnings were approved by the FDA. Second, the patient sued and obtained a settlement with the wrongdoer, i.e., the health care provider that administered the drug in the manner warned of by the manufacturer and the FDA. As to the policy changes, The Baltimore Sun apparently advocates that juries in the context of personal injury litigation should be free to engage in complicated and scientifically based risk-benefit analysis of medications and the appropriate standards for warning labels to go on drugs.
NEWS
November 7, 2008
In the waning months of the Bush administration, the Food and Drug Administration is asking the courts to extend the Republican Party's anti-regulatory zealotry well beyond the president's last day in office. This week, the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments on whether a woman who lost an arm after being improperly injected with a drug could sue the company that manufactured it, and the administration was on exactly the wrong side of the issue. The case involved musician Diana Levine, who was given the anti-nausea drug Phenergan, made by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, after she visited a Vermont clinic in 2000 seeking relief from a migraine.
NEWS
By Claire Panosian Dunavan | May 9, 2008
Not long ago, the global crisis in tainted and counterfeit drugs hit home for me. My cousin Laura - high-octane teacher, wife and mom - was rushed to her local emergency room. Six weeks earlier, she had had surgery for a broken tibia and fibula. Now a vein in her leg had clotted, and she needed immediate, high-dose anticoagulation. Physically and psychologically, Laura's first hospital stay had been bad enough. Unfortunately, after the surgery, no one had told her to stop taking her birth control pills because of the risk of clotting.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell | May 3, 2008
Prescription drug distributor McKesson Corp. has agreed to pay $13 million in civil fines to settle allegations that it failed to report as suspicious sales of large quantities of drugs, federal prosecutors in Maryland said yesterday. Under an agreement between the California-based company and U.S. attorney's offices in six states including Maryland, McKesson will also create policies beyond those required by federal regulation to detect and prevent illegal drug diversion. The Maryland claims, which account for $2 million of the fines, centered on McKesson's dealings with NewCare Pharmacy in East Baltimore and Smeeta Pharmacy in Highland.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,SUN REPORTER | April 7, 2008
Charles Sumner Dawson, a pharmaceutical researcher and World War II veteran who lived most of his life in Baltimore County, died of heart failure Thursday. He was 87. Mr. Dawson was born in Scranton, Pa., the eldest of three children. His father, an executive for an electric company, died when Mr. Dawson was 5 years old, after a bout with the flu. His mother remarried a few years later. Mr. Dawson grew up in the western suburbs of Philadelphia, referred to as the "main line," and later graduated from Lower Merion High School.
NEWS
By Fred Schulte and Doug Donovan and Fred Schulte and Doug Donovan,SUN REPORTERS | December 18, 2007
The company that makes buprenorphine holds exclusive rights to market the drug in the United States for two more years, after which competitors can make cheaper generic versions. The rights stretch until 2009 because of a federal decision to classify buprenorphine as an "orphan drug," a medicine that is expected to have little chance of making money. Yet the drug has earned millions of dollars in profits for Richmond, Va.-based Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Inc., and its parent company.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,Sun reporter | October 26, 2007
The owner of a dormant Brooklyn Park pharmaceutical plant, which was found to have open chemicals and 50,000 gallons of hazardous waste on its property, has been ordered to clean up the site by year's end or face federal fines of up to $32,500 a day. A directive issued this week by the Environmental Protection Agency requires Consolidated Pharmaceuticals Inc. to remove a tank of flesh-eating hydrochloric acid by the end of the month and a host of other...
FEATURES
By Janet Helm | September 6, 2007
Let food be your medicine and medicine be your food. Those were the words of the famed Greek physician Hippocrates nearly 3,000 years ago. Today you can barely tell the difference between the two. Or at least the line is getting fuzzier. We've boldly entered an era of nutraceuticals: a blending of foods and pharmaceuticals dubbed "phoods" and "bepherages." These functional foods and beverages are no flash in the pan. They've grown into a huge market estimated at nearly $25 billion and destined to reach $39 billion by 2011, according to the market research publisher Packaged Facts.
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