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NEWS
November 30, 2004
Brian John Shuba, a pharmaceuticals salesman and former director of planning for Bon Secours Hospital, died Saturday of cardiac arrhythmia at Good Samaritan Hospital in Lebanon, Pa. He was 36, and had been a resident of Hagerstown since last year. "He had been diagnosed with an irregular heartbeat about four years ago," said his wife of three years, the former Jo Anna Elizabeth Varsalone, who is expecting the birth of their second child next week. Mr. Shuba was born in Fort Worth, Texas, and raised in Lebanon.
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January 2, 2013
The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy has awarded the first Donald O. Fedder Memorial Fellowship to Michelle Campbell, a fifth-year student from Have de Grace. The award supports the training and development of a graduate student whose work focuses on social justice, pharmacy advocacy or public health. Campbell credits her parents with introducing her to the field of public health. As a child, she assisted her mother, a nurse, in health clinics and watched her father, a volunteer firefighter, rescue people from burning buildings.
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BUSINESS
September 29, 1998
Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. said yesterday that Amgen Inc. will pay the Baltimore company $1 million as a result of the launch of an animal study to determine if an experimental drug compound for Parkinson's disease might have toxic side effects.The companies declined to disclose when they hope to move the potentially revolutionary treatment into human clinical studies.The toxicology study, which will last one month, involves a compound known as NIL-A. It is based on molecules known as neuroimmunophilin ligands, which have shown promise in slowing disease progression.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
Federal agents in Baltimore helped lead an operation that this week seized and shut down nearly 700 U.S.-based websites linked to the sale of counterfeit pharmaceutical drugs as part of an international effort to upend the global online drug trade. The local operation, known as Bitter Pill, was part of an international initiative led by Interpol that spanned 100 countries and confiscated 3.7 million doses of counterfeit medications worth an estimated $10.5 million, according to federal officials.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2005
Corporate turbulence in the pharmaceutical industry has nudged some workers to the emerging world of biotechnology, which isn't immune from shake-ups either. Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. revealed yesterday in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that it had let go Nancy J. Linck, its general counsel and senior vice president in charge of intellectual property and regulatory affairs. She is the latest in a line of Guilford executives to leave in the past year. Guilford's new chief executive officer, Dean J. Mitchell, and Chief Financial Officer William F. Spengler, both of whom came to the company from pharmaceutical backgrounds, recently announced plans to retool the business to make it profitable.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1998
Ralph F. Shangraw, professor emeritus and former chairman of the department of pharmaceutics at the University of Maryland and a researcher known for his work with nitroglycerin and vitamins, died Friday at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Catonsville resident, who had been suffering from pulmonary problems, was 68.Beginning with his first job at his father's drugstore in Rutland, Vt., Dr. Shangraw spent his career in pharmaceuticals -- teaching, writing and researching drugs, especially vitamin supplements -- and won national and international acclaim for his work.
NEWS
November 13, 2008
Your editorial "Protecting pharmaceuticals" (Nov. 7) omits two important facts about the case before the Supreme Court and proposes policy changes that are both ill-considered and ultimately harmful to patients. The editorial neglects to mention that the method of administration of the drug in question had risks that were disclosed to the Food and Drug Administration and specifically stated in warnings that came with the drug. Those warnings were approved by the FDA. Second, the patient sued and obtained a settlement with the wrongdoer, i.e., the health care provider that administered the drug in the manner warned of by the manufacturer and the FDA. As to the policy changes, The Baltimore Sun apparently advocates that juries in the context of personal injury litigation should be free to engage in complicated and scientifically based risk-benefit analysis of medications and the appropriate standards for warning labels to go on drugs.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1997
Bio Science Contract Production Corp. said yesterday that it has struck a contract with British drug company Zeneca Pharmaceuticals Inc. to produce biological materials for a new cancer therapy that Zeneca is developing.Zeneca, part of pharmaceutical and agribusiness giant Zeneca Group PLC, holds a leading position in the world cancer drug market.The deal is the second major pharmaceutical production contract that 2-year-old Bio Science has struck in less than two jTC months. In June it struck a multiyear deal with Merck & Co. Inc., one of the world's largest drug companies, to produce materials for new vaccines Merck is developing.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1998
Continuing the aggressive acquisitions that have boosted it to a leading position in pharmaceutical marketing, Bethesda-based Snyder Communications Inc. announced yesterday that it bought CLI Pharma S.A., a pharmaceutical sales company in Paris, for $25 million.On the heels of a $43 million deal last month for Publimed Promotions SA, another French drug marketing firm, yesterday's purchase makes Snyder France's No. 1 contract drug sales firm."It's a fold-in to the acquisition they just made," said Fran Blechman Bernstein, an analyst for Merrill Lynch Inc. She said Snyder is also No. 1 in contract drug sales in the United Kingdom and is looking for other opportunities in Europe.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2005
Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. laid off 38 employees yesterday, bringing the total number of personnel cuts since December to more than 60 - about 20 percent of the work force the Baltimore biotechnology company had last fall. The move will cost the company about $1.3 million in severance and outplacement costs, but it is expected to ultimately save $6 million per year. The company also announced a realignment yesterday that includes using fewer marketing staff members to cover larger territories and consolidating certain departments.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
Shares of Human Genome Sciences doubled in Thursday morning trading on news that a major British biopharmaceutical company offered to buy it for $2.6 billion, which the Rockville company rejected as too low. Human Genome, which uses the human DNA sequence to develop targeted drugs, said in a news statement that GlaxoSmithKline PLC offered to buy the company for $13 a share in cash. The company declined the offer, saying it did not "reflect the value inherent" in Human Genome, and added that it had begun exploring strategic alternatives, including a possible sale.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
Health care services company McKesson Corp. warned state regulators Monday that it would close its Landover facility this spring and lay off 106 employees. The state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation said the San Francisco-based company, which specializes in areas such as pharmaceuticals distribution and health care IT, expected the closure to happen April 20. The pharmaceuticals division, which delivers medicine to retailers, pharmacies and hospitals, provided the warning notice.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2012
Dava Pharmaceuticals Inc. will pay about $11 million to settle federal claims that it misreported drugs prices so it could charge more of the state-federal Medicaid program, according to U.S. Attorney for Maryland Rod J. Rosenstein and others in the U.S. Department of Justice and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The settlement, under the False Claims Act, resolves allegations that Dava and corporate predecessors knowingly bucked the Medicaid rebate program between Oct. 1, 2005 and Sept.
EXPLORE
By Diane Pajak | December 14, 2011
Looking for an alternative to pharmaceuticals? Try heading east. Chinese herbs and acupuncture are the remedies of choice at Cheng's Acupuncture & Herbs Clinic, which opened in February in Columbia. The clinic is run by licensed acupuncturist Chengzhang Shi, who is certified by the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. He specializes in traditional Chinese medicine, which he first learned from his father, a traditional Chinese medicine professor in Beijing.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 2, 2011
Elizabeth K. "Beth" Hendrickson, a pharmaceutical sales representative who restored a Baltimore County farmhouse, died May 21 of brain cancer at her Upperco home. She was 53. Elizabeth Kearney was born and raised in Mechanicsburg, Pa. She was a 1975 graduate of Mechanicsburg Area High School. While attending Millersville University in Millersville, Pa., where she earned a degree in fine arts in 1979, she met and fell in love with a classmate, Karl L. Hendrickson, whom she married in 1981.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2010
Hundreds of Maryland doctors have accepted fees, some exceeding six figures, from pharmaceutical companies in the past two years to promote their drugs to other doctors — a practice that is not illegal but raises ethical questions about the industry's influence over patient care. Large companies such as Merck and Eli Lilly have disclosed $258 million in payments nationwide in 2009 and the first half of 2010, with about $6 million going to Maryland physicians and a handful of nurses.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1997
Lion Pharmaceuticals Inc., a start-up company seeking to commercialize drug research from Johns Hopkins University, yesterday announced the appointment of Michael J. Antonaccio as chief scientific officer.Antonaccio, who was recruited from Human Genome Sciences Inc., a Gaithersburg biotech firm, also will be a member of the board of directors, said Robert A. Curtis, Lion founder and chief executive.Curtis also said that Robert L. Smith will be Lion's vice president of chemistry."What we're saying here is: We're real, and we've got a senior management team in place," Curtis said.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
Health care services company McKesson Corp. warned state regulators Monday that it would close its Landover facility this spring and lay off 106 employees. The state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation said the San Francisco-based company, which specializes in areas such as pharmaceuticals distribution and health care IT, expected the closure to happen April 20. The pharmaceuticals division, which delivers medicine to retailers, pharmacies and hospitals, provided the warning notice.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2010
His soft brown image has graced the cover of National Geographic. He's a perennial on wildlife calendars, the star in several public service spots to promote bear safety and the mascot for a line of hunting apparel. His is the furry face producers and advertisers turn to when they need a teeth-baring, menacing grizzly. But at 15, Brody the bear is approaching middle age and dealing with arthritis, which could sideline his career. A pharmaceutical company in Harford County has developed a nutritional supplement for horses that is helping the 1,400-pound Kodiak bear move painlessly and with more agility, his trainer, Jeff Watson, said.
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