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NEWS
March 22, 2010
If the federal government really wants to help American citizens get affordable health care, why not regulate the pharmaceutical companies so that people can get the medicine they need without taking out a second mortgage? Oh, yeah -- I forgot -- that would involve lowering the income of multi-billion dollar corporations. Silly me!! Tony Seitz, Glen Burnie
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NEWS
October 24, 2011
As a practicing physician for over 40 years, I was saddened and disappointed to read that our own U.S. Sen. Barbara Mikulski lead the effort to successfully defeat a Senate amendment that would have made it easier for individuals to get prescription drugs from Canada for general use. She argued that "opening the borders to Canadian-made drugs could endanger American consumers. " "We could be importing death," she was quoted as saying. Shame on you, Senator Mikulski! Contrary to rumors from the pharmaceutical lobbyists, Canadians are not dying in the streets from poisoned medications.
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BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2005
Dean J. Mitchell's phone rings every day, with people calling from his old pharmaceutical stomping grounds to talk about one of two things: what it's like in the "wilds" of biotech and whether he's hiring. His first answer: "It's like doing the high-wire act without a safety net." His second: "Yes." Over the past decade, many - like Mitchell - have left the pharmaceutical industry for the less-established field of biotechnology, which some scientists believe will make the world's next big medical breakthroughs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 2, 2011
Elizabeth K. "Beth" Hendrickson, a pharmaceutical sales representative who restored a Baltimore County farmhouse, died May 21 of brain cancer at her Upperco home. She was 53. Elizabeth Kearney was born and raised in Mechanicsburg, Pa. She was a 1975 graduate of Mechanicsburg Area High School. While attending Millersville University in Millersville, Pa., where she earned a degree in fine arts in 1979, she met and fell in love with a classmate, Karl L. Hendrickson, whom she married in 1981.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | August 19, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The Maryland health department did by regulation yesterday what the legislature twice failed to do: require pharmaceutical companies to give the state an estimated $2.5 million annual rebate for drugs purchased under programs to help the poor.Pharmaceutical companies opposed the rebate proposal, which was approved 13-0 by a legislative oversight committee. The companies said it is impossible to estimate the savings because that is a function of which drugs are purchased and their unit costs.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | February 17, 1994
ANNAPOLIS -- Del. Donald B. Elliott, a Republican representing Carroll and Howard counties, yesterday continued his effort to end what he calls discriminatory pricing in the pharmaceutical industry.His bill, which he also introduced last year, will benefit consumers, said Mr. Elliott, a Union Bridge pharmacist.House Bill 522 would require that pharmaceutical companies charge retail pharmacies the same price for drugs that they charge hospitals, health maintenance organizations and mail-order companies.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | October 9, 1992
Since biotechnology companies were locked out of the equity markets early this year, they have looked across the Atlantic to European financiers and pharmaceutical companies for money and expertise.And they aren't being turned away. Europe's large pharmaceutical companies seem eager to grab the technology that is so abundant in the United States, but more scarce in Europe.Speaking yesterday at a World Trade Center conference on global partnerships between biotechnology companies in the United States and those abroad, Kenneth B. Lee Jr., national director of Ernst & Young's life sciences practice, said that once again biotech companies have gone outside the United States to do deals.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2000
Canadian drug maker Cangene Corp. has agreed to buy Chesapeake Biological Laboratories Inc. for $42 million in cash and the assumption of $7.2 million in outstanding debt. The deal comes in the midst of the Baltimore-based drug manufacturing contractor's turnaround after posting a $5.4 million loss in fiscal 1999. An executive with Cangene said the company, based in Winnipeg, Manitoba, expected business to grow with the Baltimore laboratory, which employs 105 at its laboratory. "It expands this area of our business and it gives us a U.S. base of operations," said Alex Glasenberg, Cangene's chief financial officer.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2003
Gene Logic Inc., a marketer of genetic information used by drug researchers, said yesterday that it has agreed to acquire TherImmune Research Corp. for $52 million in cash and stock. The Gaithersburg-based company said the acquisition will broaden its customer base that now consists primarily of large pharmaceutical companies. Privately held TherImmune, also of Gaithersburg, handles drug discovery experiments, animal studies and early-stage clinical trials under contracts with small and medium-size biotechnology companies.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | March 2, 1993
Words of comfort for biotech industryLast week was a hard one for biotechnology stocks, which were down about 20 percent after disappointing news from two major companies, Synergen Inc. and Amgen Inc. But Stelios Papadopoulos, managing director of investment banking at PaineWebber Inc. and a biotech specialist, doesn't believe the long-term effect will be catastrophic.While public capital markets for biotech companies appear to have been shut tight, biotech companies have raised an unprecedented $7 billion in the past two years, he says.
NEWS
By Tyler Brown, Kaci Hickox, Mike Rogers and Jane Andrews | October 14, 2010
Worldwide, 10 million people die each year because they cannot access medicines for treatable diseases. While Johns Hopkins University is a world-renowned research institution and a leading force in promoting global health, students remain deeply troubled that our university has not committed to making the medicines it helps discover available and affordable to the world's poor. Last week, in an interview with WYPR's Dan Rodricks, Johns Hopkins University President Ronald Daniels heralded the university's contributions to improving health throughout the developing world.
NEWS
March 22, 2010
If the federal government really wants to help American citizens get affordable health care, why not regulate the pharmaceutical companies so that people can get the medicine they need without taking out a second mortgage? Oh, yeah -- I forgot -- that would involve lowering the income of multi-billion dollar corporations. Silly me!! Tony Seitz, Glen Burnie
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,sun reporter | April 13, 2007
MedImmune Inc.'s board of directors said yesterday that it will consider selling the state's flagship biotechnology company to what would likely be a non-Maryland pharmaceutical buyer after facing months of pressure from dissatisfied shareholders to pursue such a move. The announcement, which contrasts with a commitment to go it alone that the board made two months ago, sent the Gaithersburg-based company's stock soaring and raised questions from Maryland's business community. MedImmune, which has about 1,700 employees in the state, said it had received inquiries from potential buyers and will consider whether it makes sense to remain independent or to pursue a sale.
NEWS
By Peter J. Pitts | February 20, 2007
Imagine that you are an inventor and the government steals your highly lucrative idea. The next day, you are informed that the government plans to mass-produce your invention and give it away for free. If you're lucky, they'll give you a pittance for your efforts. This is what happens, with increasing regularity, to the manufacturers of lifesaving medicines. The most recent example occurred in Thailand when the military-appointed government issued "compulsory licenses" to obtain two drugs.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,sun reporter | December 17, 2006
When a judge ruled this summer that Advancis Pharmaceutical Corp. had to change its name because it was too similar to another company's, it was a significant setback. But it offered a chance for the Germantown drugmaker to do better. "One of the things that is important to us is to have our own unique identity here, and this gives us an opportunity to do that," said Edward M. Rudnic, Advancis' chief executive. "There's an opportunity to make us a little more unique." While biotech and pharmaceutical companies have come up with some creative titles for their drugs, they typically pick business names that make them sound like one of the pack.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | November 30, 2005
The Viagras and Zolofts, the Lipitors and Nexiums, are in trouble. Such blockbuster drugs have earned billions for their creators, but patents are soon to expire on some of the most popular products, opening their formulas to generic copycats and threatening future profits for drug companies desperate to produce the next generation of stars for the medicine cabinet. That situation underlies this week's announcement by Merck & Co. Inc. that it will lay off 7,000 employees, a 10th of its work force, and shutter five of 31 manufacturing sites to save $4 billion through 2010.
NEWS
October 24, 2011
As a practicing physician for over 40 years, I was saddened and disappointed to read that our own U.S. Sen. Barbara Mikulski lead the effort to successfully defeat a Senate amendment that would have made it easier for individuals to get prescription drugs from Canada for general use. She argued that "opening the borders to Canadian-made drugs could endanger American consumers. " "We could be importing death," she was quoted as saying. Shame on you, Senator Mikulski! Contrary to rumors from the pharmaceutical lobbyists, Canadians are not dying in the streets from poisoned medications.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 29, 1995
WASHINGTON -- As the American medical system rushes to control costs, imports of discount drugs and their ingredients are rising. And that is causing concern about how well foreign manufacturers meet American standards aimed at preventing toxic contamination and poor quality.Over the past three years the Food and Drug Administration has doubled the number of its inspections at foreign plants, and it has been rejecting or detaining more products.In the past year alone, the agency has found serious manufacturing deficiencies, from contaminated water supplies to lax quality controls, in 35 percent of its overseas inspections, in countries as varied as Switzerland and China, compared with 19 percent at domestic plants.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2005
After a year of layoffs, restructuring and a management overhaul, Baltimore biotech Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. announced yesterday its sale to cancer-drug maker MGI Pharma Inc. of Bloomington, Minn., in a deal worth $177.5 million in cash and stock. Guilford shares jumped 41 percent yesterday on the Nasdaq stock market, rising 99 cents to close at $3.40 on the news after months of revitalization efforts under Dean J. Mitchell, the chief executive officer brought in from Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. MGI, with about 300 employees, said it plans to maintain the Baltimore operation and retain many of Guilford's 250 staff members, particularly those in research and development and sales.
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