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By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | March 12, 2000
Accompanying this early spring's burst of first novels comes publication of Egyptian Nobel Laureate Naguib Mafouz's 1985 "Akhenaten: Dweller In Truth," (Anchor Books, 168 pages, $12), the tale of Pharaoh Akhenaten, also known as the "sun king," and "the heretic." Defying the priests of Amun, Akhenaten chooses to worship a god of love and compassion. For this defiance of tradition and the prevailing power structure of priests and military, he is slandered and driven both from office and from history.
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By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | May 2, 2008
Who will speak for the pharaoh Akhenaten, the builder of temples and cities who reigned over ancient Egypt 2,400 years ago? Who will explain his oddly shaped head, sunken eyes, pendulous breasts and a belly that made him look pregnant? That would be Irwin M. Braverman. The Yale medical school dermatology professor will address a University of Maryland medical school conference today on the genetic disorders that might have determined Akhaenaten's strange appearance. He has spent months pouring over images of Akhenaten and come up with a theory about the teenage pharaoh's peculiarities.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | May 2, 2008
Who will speak for the pharaoh Akhenaten, the builder of temples and cities who reigned over ancient Egypt 2,400 years ago? Who will explain his oddly shaped head, sunken eyes, pendulous breasts and a belly that made him look pregnant? That would be Irwin M. Braverman. The Yale medical school dermatology professor will address a University of Maryland medical school conference today on the genetic disorders that might have determined Akhaenaten's strange appearance. He has spent months pouring over images of Akhenaten and come up with a theory about the teenage pharaoh's peculiarities.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,Special to the Sun | March 14, 2008
The lesson for today is from the 37th chapter of the book of Genesis, beginning at the third verse: "Now Israel loved Joseph more than any of his children, because he was the son of his old age: and he made him a coat of many colors. "And when his brethren saw that their father loved him more than all his brethren, they hated him, and could not speak peaceably unto him." Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat follows the Bible story closely, telling it with charm and a lively sense of fun - qualities that are fully expressed in a splendid production by Toby's Dinner Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gary Vikan and Gary Vikan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 2000
My impressions this summer on a first trip to Egypt were mostly of the usual sort: pyramids (and temples, too) out of scale with anything human, an unrelenting sun dictating still, as for millennia, the tempo of each day, and everywhere the press of bodies. But perhaps unusually, the Sphinx left me less with a feeling of timelessness and awe than with a sense of impending disaster - of the imminent collision of the now with the forever. This huge, mutilated face, which has stared silently and mostly alone into nearly 5000 years of sunrises, now watches daily the inexorable advance across the Nile of a chaotic modern city, Cairo, that has more than doubled in size in my lifetime, to 15 million.
NEWS
By Charles M. Sennot and Charles M. Sennot,New York Times News Service | November 26, 2004
LUXOR, Egypt -- Out of the blinding light of a fall morning here in the Valley of the Kings, American archaeologist Kent Weeks led the way down a narrow, stone passageway and into the entrance of a tomb. Weeks peered his flashlight into the enveloping darkness of "the hidden tomb," as he calls it, and pressed on through the damp, winding passages toward what may be his archaeological team's most significant find after years of methodical digging, scraping and brushing. At the end of a long hallway a human skull rested, propped up in a wooden box, and framed in the bleak light of a bare bulb powered by a generator that rumbled through the stony silence of the tomb.
NEWS
December 30, 2005
TV PICK-- THE MUMMY WHO MIGHT BE KING-- Could a mummy found in Niagara Falls be the remains of a pharaoh? (MPT, Tuesday 8 p.m.)
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | April 3, 1994
25 Years Ago* Some 250 Western Maryland College coeds turned out with blankets Tuesday night to hold a "sleep in" in the Baker Memorial Chapel in protest over the barring of sorority girls from the new women's dormitory. The girls abandoned their protest plans, students reported, after Dr. Lowell S. Ensor, president of the college, assured spokesmen for the protesters that he would review the dormitory policy. -- Democratic Advocate, March 24, 1969.75 Years Ago* "The story in the Pilot of March 7 about the coming of the locusts makes me homesick.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | April 9, 1997
But does Bankers Trust understand about lacrosse?The Housing Department is the agency of Baltimore government that transforms decrepit houses into rubble and poor people into destitute. Elsewhere, these tasks are left to private enterprise.Like an ancient pharaoh, Jack Kent Cooke built his own mausoleum.D6The Os went 4-1 without Robbie? Is there a moral?Pub Date: 4/09/97
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Popular Music Critic | February 3, 1992
IF YOU DIDN'T tune in for last night's premiere of Michael Jackson's new video, ''Remember the Time,'' you have some questions about what you missed. ''What was the story line?'' you may be wondering. ''Were the special effects good? Was Eddie Murphy funny? Could Magic Johnson act?''And did Michael grab his crotch again?''To answer the most important question first: No, he didn't grab his crotch. Nor did he trash any parked cars, or throw steering wheels or trash cans through storefront windows.
NEWS
By Jerome M. Segal and Jerome M. Segal,Special to The Sun | July 8, 2007
There is a growing movement to teach the Bible "as literature" to children in public schools. The case is made that the Bible has been so central to Western civilization that ignorance must be seen as a form of "illiteracy." However, if we take off the thick religious lens through which the Bible has been traditionally read (as any public school teacher should be required to do), we will find a far more remarkable tale than is taught in Sunday school, but one that challenges traditional Jewish and Christian conceptions of the nature of God and his relationship to mankind.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | May 8, 2007
The mother of a long-missing witness in a Baltimore murder trial brought the man to court yesterday morning. By yesterday afternoon, Pharaoh Carr - who ignored six notices to appear in court, even leaving the state at one point - was on the witness stand in the case of LeShawn Green. Green is accused in a July 2005 East Baltimore pizza parlor shooting that left Jawan Lee, 16, dead and three other teenagers wounded. Over several months, police recorded jailhouse conversations in which Green, 25, encouraged Carr, 22, not to come to court.
NEWS
By Ronald Kotulak and Ronald Kotulak,Chicago Tribune | November 28, 2006
CHICAGO -- When Egyptian scientists performed the first CT scan of the mummy of Tutankhamun, they turned up a key clue: Bone fragments from the pharaoh's first vertebra, near the skull, were not coated with embalming fluid. Instead, the fragments were clean at the breaks, meaning that the damage had to have occurred after the pharaoh's remains were prepared for burial. The evidence seems to rule out a blow to the base of the skull as the cause of Tut's death, a theory in play ever since X-rays of the boy king were taken in 1968.
NEWS
December 30, 2005
TV PICK-- THE MUMMY WHO MIGHT BE KING-- Could a mummy found in Niagara Falls be the remains of a pharaoh? (MPT, Tuesday 8 p.m.)
NEWS
By CHARLYNE VARKONYI SCHAUB and CHARLYNE VARKONYI SCHAUB,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | October 16, 2005
King Tut fever has infected the world of design. Get ready for everything from pharaoh heads to sarcophagus storage. Egyptian has become the motif du jour, inspired by Tutankamum and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs, a four-city traveling exhibit. The boy king may seem an unlikely design muse, but he has proven to be an inspiration since his burial chamber was discovered in 1922. The result back then was a worldwide craze for Egyptian design. He inspired decor from the grave again in the late 1970s with "The Treasure of Tutankhamun" exhibit.
NEWS
By Charles M. Sennot and Charles M. Sennot,New York Times News Service | November 26, 2004
LUXOR, Egypt -- Out of the blinding light of a fall morning here in the Valley of the Kings, American archaeologist Kent Weeks led the way down a narrow, stone passageway and into the entrance of a tomb. Weeks peered his flashlight into the enveloping darkness of "the hidden tomb," as he calls it, and pressed on through the damp, winding passages toward what may be his archaeological team's most significant find after years of methodical digging, scraping and brushing. At the end of a long hallway a human skull rested, propped up in a wooden box, and framed in the bleak light of a bare bulb powered by a generator that rumbled through the stony silence of the tomb.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | March 28, 1991
CHICAGO -- Using modern computer technology, a University of Chicago archaeologist has coaxed a secret from Egypt's ancient, silent Sphinx -- the famous monument's face was modeled after the government figure who ordered it built.Egyptologists have long suspected that the Sphinx was modeled after the Pharaoh Chefren, who ordered it created in about 2500 B.C., but computer work by Mark Lehner, an `D assistant professor at the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute, confirms the suspicion.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Popular Music Critic | February 3, 1992
If you didn't tune in for last night's premiere of Michael Jackson's new video, ''Remember the Time,'' you have some xTC questions about what you missed. ''What was the story line?'' you may be wondering. ''Were the special effects good? Was Eddie Murphy funny? Could Magic Johnson act?''And did Michael grab his crotch again?''To answer the most important question first: No, he didn't grab his crotch. Nor did he trash any parked cars, or throw steering wheels or trash cans through storefront windows.
NEWS
By David Kelly and David Kelly,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 10, 2003
SALT LAKE CITY - Corky Ra poured a glass of red wine and cleared his throat. He was about to make a peculiar pitch, selling a death fit for a king. "The moment between life and death is a pause," he said, sitting inside the 30-foot-high pyramid in his front yard. "It's the moment of rest before the next life." Some of the 18 people in the room nodded knowingly, others seemed baffled. "Tell them what happens when you get buried in a grave," Ra said, looking over at fellow funeral director Ron Temu.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 26, 2002
Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat got its start as a cantata for a boys' school choir. So it's inherently well-suited to children's theater. And Pumpkin Theatre's holiday production is as charming and cleverly staged as any children's show you're likely to see this season. Director/choreographer Todd Pearthree and his design team include numerous witty touches in this hourlong rendition of Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice's oft-produced Old Testament musical. For example, when Joseph (mellow-voiced Brent Bell)
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