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By GREGORY KANE | June 5, 1999
CHILDREN of the world, you are surrounded by a confederacy of adult dunces.So your parents take you out to see a movie. It just might be the one called "Star Wars: Episode 1: The Phantom Menace." You see this funny-looking critter running around named Jar Jar Binks, talking in some unknown accent and providing the movie's comic relief. You figure the character is harmless and perhaps amusing.Then those pain-in-the-butt grown-ups step in. Jar Jar Binks, according to this assortment of grinches who skipped childhood and went straight into curmudgeonhood, is neither funny nor cute.
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NEWS
May 15, 2014
William Smith writes that Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s column concerning the Republican Party being the champion of small business is a fantasy and sets forth his own storyline that he alleges to have a "ring of truth to it" ( "Ehrlich's small business rhetoric rings hollow," May 13). Normally, I would dismiss such cliché riddled rants for what they are worth. However, the truly disturbing part of his letter is that Mr. Smith unfortunately depicts the predominant thinking found in our colleges and universities, the national media, and the leadership of the Democratic Party.
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NEWS
September 18, 2004
WHEN THE PRODUCERS of The Phantom of the Opera announced last month that the popular musical would close its Baltimore run two weeks early, a chill ran through downtown's west-side redevelopment campaign. Was the Hippodrome Theatre foundering? Had ticket sales tanked? Had the proverbial chandelier crashed on Baltimore's newest stage? The answer was no. Apparently, the touring company just needed a vacation. After Phantom closes tomorrow, some big shows, including Thoroughly Modern Millie and The King & I, are waiting in the wings.
NEWS
April 15, 2014
I found your recent story about the fight between an aide to Del. Mary-Dulany James and his brother both alarming and painful ( "After claiming he was assaulted by 'a black man,' aide to Harford legislator James, brother charged in Annapolis fight," April 10). According to the Capitol Police report, Luke Horah stated that a large African-American male assaulted him and fled the scene. Here you have a sibling altercation that resulted in injury, but rather than tell the truth about his brother, Mr. Horah decided to implicate a fictitious "black man. " What if the truth hadn't been discovered so quickly?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2010
The famous 1-ton chandelier appearing in "The Phantom of the Opera" lumbers slowly toward the stage of the Hippodrome Theatre, looking for all the world like a flying wedding cake. Actually, it looks like a wedding cake that has been frosted on just one side, since the back is noticably lacking the white glass dollops and gilted doodads adorning the front. The chandelier lists first to the left and then to the right, before settling on the four metal feet protruding from the bottom.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 11, 2005
The ballyhoo behind the abysmal film of Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom of the Opera has blown some good news movie-lovers' way. Spurred by the excitement surrounding that picture before anybody had seen it, the Alloy Orchestra, sorcerers of percussive music made with unconventional instruments, devoted the winter to preparing a new score for the peerlessly creepy 1925 Lon Chaney version. "We knew that the `new'Phantom was coming out, and we were assuming it was going to be a big hit," says Alloy co-founder Ken Winokur, on the phone from Cambridge, Mass.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | June 10, 1991
ANDREW Lloyd Webber's ''Phantom of the Opera'' has arrived at the Kennedy Center Opera House looking a little road weary. This, however, is a situation that may right itself.The show is going to be there for three months, so there is reason to assume that this road version will look as good as the Broadway edition before too many weeks have passed.Webber's ''Phantom'' is a very visual show. Knowing that the story was a familiar one (even more familiar since the Webber version opened, and thanks to any number of Webber-inspired copies)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | July 24, 1992
In the opening scene of Calderon de la Barca's "The Phantom Lady," a mysterious veiled woman --es across the stage begging a nobleman for protection, and moments later the nobleman finds himself in the throes of a sword fight.Before you can say, "Boo!," this Bowman Ensemble production, presented outdoors at McDonogh School, introduces the major themes of this 17th century Spanish comedy -- romance and chivalry. And, judging from the characters' wildly exaggerated behavior, Calderon believed human nature is equally silly in matters of love and honor.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 30, 1992
Scientists say they have found that "phantom" algae are responsible for mysterious mass kills that have destroyed millions of fish.The toxic algae, which have not been given a scientific name, were found in the Pamlico and Neuse estuaries in North Carolina. They appear in the water as if out of nowhere, kill hordes of fish in estuaries and fish farms by releasing poisons, and just as quickly disappear.Because the algae can survive in everything from fresh water to the salinity of the open sea, the scientists say they suspect that these resilient and powerful killers are likely to be widespread.
NEWS
By ROBERT KAHN and ROBERT KAHN,NEWSDAY | January 8, 2006
It's a wrenching number of times to relive a heartbreak. When the curtain rises tomorrow at the Majestic Theatre, it will mark the 7,486th time the caped Phantom ascends from the catacombs beneath the Paris Opera to terrorize those within it. Every night, the masked figure falls dangerously in love with the delicate soprano Christine and challenges a stalwart nobleman for her affections. Broadway's Phantom does not survive unscathed, as 11 million theatergoers have seen since Jan. 26, 1988.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
The city of Baltimore is likely wasting tens of thousands of dollars a month on "phantom" phone lines that are never used, the city's new information technology director said Thursday. Chris Tonjes, who heads the Mayor's Office of Information Technology, said he's discovered 51 idle phone lines in his agency alone. He recommended that the city conduct an audit to review the status of its estimated 14,000 lines - and said that based on audits in other cities, Baltimore probably could save 15 percent of its $16 million annual phone bill.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, assistant editor, b | June 10, 2012
"My friend down there, she was wondering: Are you alone?" -- random blonde to Don Draper It was a somehow infuritatly quiet end to the season. Sorry to those who had Pete Campbell killing himself as a sure bet in your office pool. That didn't happen. Though he was punched again. Twice. Still, there was a beauty in the understated season finale. Though I expected something a bit more major to happen (perhaps Don and Megan breaking up? Perhaps her revealing she's not really French or that she, in fact, really loves Howard Johnson)
NEWS
February 24, 2012
Last year, Maryland's Democratic-controlled General Assembly made short work of a Republican-sponsored bill that would have required voters to show a government-issued photo ID before being allowed to vote. The legislation, which closely tracked similar GOP-backed ballot security laws around the country, died in committee without ever coming up for a vote. But Del. Kathryn L. Afzali, the Frederick Republican who is the bill's chief sponsor, is back with a substantially revised version of her original proposal that she hopes will pass muster with her colleagues on the House Ways and Means Committee.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2012
Herman G. "Hank" Tillman Jr., a retired Air Force colonel and pilot who flew in World War II, Korea and Vietnam and was one of Maryland's most decorated veterans, died Sunday of liver failure at his Chester home. He was 89. He was born in his immigrant grandparents' Anne Arundel County farmhouse, and later moved with his family to a home at Pontiac Avenue and Sixth Street in Brooklyn. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1940, he attended the Johns Hopkins University at night and worked at Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s engineering department during the day. "As a kid, he was fascinated with flying.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Broadwater | October 25, 2011
Here we are at the half-way point in the competition. The reward for remaining in contention is participation in DWTS's special Halloween show next week. One thing's for sure. Frustrations are surfacing and they're being voiced. It makes for an awkward viewing experience, but maybe it's just a tactic to keep interest and avoid a mid-season slump. Last night it was pro Maksim Chmerkovskiy who vented his frustrations. Tonight there was a little bit of an apology. And while Maks didn't apologize for his opinions expressed to judge Len Goodman, he did admit that DWTS is not, as he called it last night, his show . Tonight we heard the gripes of contestant Chaz Bono, who said he was fed up with judge Bruno Tonioli referring to him as things like a cute penguin or an Ewok.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | August 25, 2011
The lingering effects of racism percolate through Alonzo D. LaMont Jr.'s "Zulu Fits. " Although the production directed by the playwright at Heralds of Hope Theater has some rough edges, it's a thoughtful play about how young African-Americans are literally haunted by things that happened centuries ago. "Zulu Fits" is the final play to open in this summer's Baltimore Playwrights Festival. It also marks the debut for Heralds of Hope Theater in Baltimore City's Station North arts district.
NEWS
By Mark Chalkley | June 20, 1991
THE biggest problem in discussing the controversial "politically correct" movement on U.S. campuses is that no such movement exists. This so-called "movement" that has been so widely discussed has never held a convention, a rally or even a meeting. The "PC movement" is a phantom.What does exist -- and what has outraged the conservative columnists who invented the phantom movement -- is a trend in higher education away from the traditional focus on the accomplishments and viewpoints of Anglo-Saxon American men to the exclusion of others.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | January 8, 1995
There was no World Series in 1994. But there were World Series baseballs -- and they have become popular collectibles.According to Scott Smith, director of marketing services for Rawlings, which manufactures the balls for Major League Baseball, the balls sold as souvenirs are identical to the ones put in play.Smith says these are sold to authorized Rawlings sporting goods dealers, who sometimes resell them to hobby dealers or sell them by mail order.He would not disclose production figures but says, "It is not a numbered collectible or a limited edition.
NEWS
February 14, 2011
No act of government is more essential to a democracy than the running of clean and honest elections. Voters have a right to expect their ballots to be counted accurately and for officials to take all reasonable and necessary steps to prevent fraud. That's why the notion that voters should present a government-issued photo ID sounds compelling. For most of us, it would pose no particular hardship, as airport ticket agents, store cashiers and the guy who hands out bowling shoes at the local alley regularly ask for it, too. But, in fact, it's a very bad idea that would harm the credibility of elections far more than help them.
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