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By PERSPECTIVE EDITOR MIKE ADAMS | October 12, 1997
Comments on Pfiesteria piscicida, compiled by Perspective editor Mike Adams.John Goodall, Pocomoke River Watcher for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation."When you look at industrial waste, you can look at a large industry and say, 'point source.' It's not hard. You can look and see a pipe that's spewing a lot of pollution and you can say, 'Look, we have a problem here.'"We've made great strides in correcting those sorts of problems, but the much harder one is nonpoint source pollution - when you look at a whole region like Maryland's Eastern Shore and see natural beauty and there are no large industrial sites you can point to as a source of pollution.
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NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | January 12, 2007
Federal researchers said yesterday they have identified the toxin released by Pfiesteria, the microscopic marine organism blamed for mass fish killings and human health problems in the Chesapeake Bay and elsewhere in the late 1990s. Peter Moeller, a chemist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, studied the marine organism over the past seven years and said he has concluded that heavy metals - mainly a copper sulfur complex - cause Pfiesteria to release a toxin that stuns fish and destroys skin, leaving bloody lesions and causing death.
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NEWS
October 3, 1998
University of Maryland environmental scientists have been awarded a federal grant to try to unravel the reasons Pfiesteria piscicida and other toxic microbes afflict only certain bodies of water.The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration has awarded $613,899 to the university's Center for Environmental Science to fund the first year of a five-year study, according to Rep. Wayne P. Gilchrest's staff. The center will use the funds to develop techniques for studying Pfiesteria in shallow waters and analyze factors that might trigger outbreaks, such as poor water circulation and the presence of nutrients.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | July 6, 2006
The algae Pfiesteria, blamed for memory loss among watermen during a 1997 outbreak in a Chesapeake Bay tributary, does not harm people routinely exposed to it at low levels, a study released yesterday concludes. The research by a team of scientists led by Dr. J. Glenn Morris, chairman of preventive medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, found that the microorganism is common throughout the Chesapeake Bay, from the Patapsco River near Baltimore to the Pocomoke River on the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1997
The members of the Rev. John Layton's country parish near Shelltown are mostly retirees who, unlike the area's watermen, fish merchants and chicken farmers, have been little affected by the problem of Pfiesteria piscicida.It is a hard-to-miss problem, nevertheless.Just down the road is the Fred Maddox family seafood business, which sounded the first alarms that something in the Pocomoke River seemed to be harming people and fish. Television news trucks and a stream of scientists and public health officers pass tiny Rehoboth Baptist Church on their way to the site where thousands of fish have died.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1997
Delaware officials said yesterday that tests of water samples from the Indian River in early August verified the presence of Pfiesteria piscicida in a nontoxic form. The river will remain open, they said.Researchers say Pfiesteria can take numerous forms, several of them toxic, but also can remain dormant and harmless for long periods. The state's Department of Natural Resources began investigating after several reports of fish with lesions. There have been no reports in Delaware of fish kills related to Pfiesteria or of human health complaints such as those experienced by several people in Maryland, said a department spokesman.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 14, 1998
State officials called off daily sampling of fish in an Eastern Shore waterway yesterday after finding no signs of a significant outbreak of toxic Pfiesteria.Liz Kalinowski, a spokesman for the Department of Natural Resources, said officials decided to cut back their sampling in Shiles Creek, which runs into the Wicomico River, after finding only three menhaden with lesions in three days of testing. She said the state will continue to take samples from the creek every week.Natural resources officials began daily sampling Aug. 4 after finding 31 menhaden with fresh lesions characteristic of Pfiesteria exposure in the creek near the Somerset County community of Whitehaven.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 2, 1998
Maryland has been awarded $560,000 in federal money toward setting up scientific tripwires to detect possible outbreaks of Pfiesteria, a toxic microbe believed to have triggered fish kills in the waterways of several Atlantic states. The state has already allocated $1 million for testing.Delaware, Virginia, North Carolina and Florida were also given grants by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency to test rivers and streams for Pfiesteria piscicida.
NEWS
October 17, 1997
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun about the governor's blue-ribbon commission on Pfiesteria gave incorrect information about its schedule. Meetings will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday, 9: 30 a.m. Thursday, 9 a.m. Oct. 27 and 9 a.m. Oct. 29 in the Environmental Matters Committee chambers, Lowe House Office Building, Annapolis.The Sun regrets the error.A governor's commission was to meet today in Annapolis to hear Donald F. Boeschof the University of Maryland's Center for Environmental Sciencediscuss blooms of Pfiesteria piscicida in bay tributaries.
NEWS
By SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 30, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Maryland's two senators have joined with North Carolina Sen. Lauch Faircloth to introduce legislation that would authorize $15 million for a study by the Army Corps of Engineers of a microbe blamed in major fish kills in both states.The bill, introduced last week by Sens. Paul S. Sarbanes and Barbara A. Mikulski, both Democrats, and Faircloth, one of the most conservative Republicans in the Senate, directs the Corps of Engineers to develop a plan to address declining water quality.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2005
WHEN J. Lowell Stoltzfus is not doing battle at the State House, the state senator is most likely out in his cabbage patch protecting his young plants. The Senate minority leader grows cabbage plants - lots of cabbage plants. "We just finished up shipping about 30 million plants," said the 56-year-old Republican who represents the lower Eastern Shore. The small plants are shipped throughout the country, where they are transplanted and grown to produce heads of cabbage. He estimates that as much as 40 percent of the sauerkraut consumed in the nation originated on his farm on the shore of the Pocomoke River, a few miles outside Pocomoke City.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2005
SHELLTOWN, Md. - Eagles and ospreys and showers of bright warbler song. Mighty bald cypresses and hours of unbroken forest, studded with the blooms of wild azalea and native viburnum. From the quiet headwater swamps where we began to the wide open cordgrass marshes where we "took out" three days later, a recent kayak trip down the twisty old Pocomoke River was a joyous passage through spring. Less than a decade ago, such a trip might have been considered dangerous to one's health. The Pocomoke was on the list of America's most endangered rivers, and "For Sale" signs were posted along its banks.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2002
A long-simmering scientific controversy over Pfiesteria piscicida, the microscopic cell suspected of killing fish and making people sick, reached the boiling point yesterday when five North Carolina scientists challenged the work of the nation's main Pfiesteria expert. The scientists, led by biologist Wayne Litaker of the University of North Carolina, published the results of their research, saying they believe Pfiesteria is not the complicated creature described by JoAnn Burkholder of North Carolina State University, the organism's co-discoverer.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2002
Conditions are right for toxic Pfiesteria to appear in Middle River and some upper Chesapeake Bay creeks later this summer if the region's deep drought doesn't break, said a top Department of Natural Resources scientist. Robert E. Magnien, who supervises the state's study of the harmful microorganism, said scientists have consistently found it, apparently in a dormant stage, in Middle River since they began looking in 1999. That summer, fish with the bloody sores associated with Pfiesteria turned up in the river, one of the Baltimore area's most popular boating and fishing spots.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2001
MORE THAN four years later, events of the summer of 1997 remain one of the Chesapeake Bay's biggest puzzles, still charged with scientific and political debate. What really happened to make Maryland's governor close down the Pocomoke and other lower Eastern Shore waterways to all fishing and human contact? An outbreak of toxic Pfiesteria, you say. And quite possibly, you are right; but almost certainly, it will turn out to be more complicated than that. A letter from a poultry industry spokesman urges me to stop referencing the "disastrous outbreak of toxic Pfiesteria" (Oct.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2001
State biologists have stepped up monitoring at two sites, one in Baltimore City and one in Somerset County, where sick or distressed fish and traces of Pfiesteria have recently been found together. In both cases, tests showed Pfiesteria at very low levels, and there was no proof of a toxic outbreak, said officials at the Department of Natural Resources. The first incident occurred Aug. 6, when employees of the state Department of the Environment noticed fish swimming erratically in Colgate Creek, which flows past the agency's parking lot and into the Patapsco River in the city.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | January 9, 1998
In a message to local farmers, members of Carroll County's General Assembly delegation vowed to fight any mandatory Pfiesteria control measures and pledged to continue efforts to obtain more money for the new county Agricultural Center building."
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2001
State biologists have stepped up monitoring at two sites, one in Baltimore City and one in Somerset County, where sick or distressed fish and traces of Pfiesteria have recently been found together. In both cases, tests showed Pfiesteria at very low levels, and there was no proof of a toxic outbreak, said officials at the Department of Natural Resources. The first incident occurred Aug. 6, when employees of the state Department of the Environment noticed fish swimming erratically in Colgate Creek, which flows past the agency's parking lot and into the Patapsco River in the city.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2001
A four-year search for toxic Pfiesteria in Maryland waters has uncovered evidence that several other varieties of harmful algae, often fueled by pollution, may be seriously damaging bay life. For years, scientists thought that the Chesapeake Bay and Maryland's coastal bays were mostly free from the harmful algae blooms that plague seriously polluted waters around the world - and are increasingly seen in state waters at this time of year. But after Pfiesteria killed fish and sickened people on some Eastern Shore rivers in 1997, the State Department of Natural Resources fielded teams of biologists to look for signs of the toxic cell.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2001
Maryland medical officials have documented five cases of people who might have been sickened by Pfiesteria during the past three years, though no confirmed fish kills have been attributed to the toxic microorganism since 1997. Dr. Glenn Morris, director of the University of Maryland School of Medicine's Pfiesteria research program, said yesterday that the five people all have symptoms consistent with an illness known as estuarine associated syndrome, which was first identified after a major outbreak of Pfiesteria on Maryland's Pocomoke River in 1997.
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