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By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | July 22, 2011
For millions of years, crabs have been scuttling about the bottom of the world's oceans and bays, but few regions have embraced the mean-spirited, omnivorous crustacean with as much vigor as we have here in Maryland. When I moved here from the Midwest and soon after attended my first crab feast, I remember thinking, "What is wrong with these people?" Sitting in the hot sun for hours at a clip, smashing steamed crustaceans with a mallet and then sorting through razor-sharp bits of shell and crab entrails for a thimbleful of meat seemed more like some sort of torture than a good time.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
Rodney G. Stieff, former chairman of the board and CEO of Kirk-Stieff Co., which was the oldest silversmith firm in the country, died Tuesday of kidney cancer at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson. The former longtime Orchards resident was 87. "He was a very good businessman, and he helped from the standpoint of the financial end," said a brother, Charles C. Stieff II, former executive vice president of the company, who was in charge of its wholesale division. "And he really knew our business, especially from the engineering and manufacturing end. I was in the selling end of it," said Mr. Stieff, who lives in Cockeysville.
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NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and By Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | August 29, 2004
To be honest, there are almost no unequivocally silver-foliaged plants. There are silvery green, frosty blue, ghostly purple, pewtered-burgundy, and even silvery rose. But while every silver-foliaged plant has a drop of color underlying the pearled leaves, their overall effect is one of shimmering light. "Silver leaves catch the moonlight," says landscape architect KenSchmidt, a principal with Mahan Rykiel Associates in Baltimore. "They're nice for edges and walkways, so at nighttime you can really see them."
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | July 22, 2011
For millions of years, crabs have been scuttling about the bottom of the world's oceans and bays, but few regions have embraced the mean-spirited, omnivorous crustacean with as much vigor as we have here in Maryland. When I moved here from the Midwest and soon after attended my first crab feast, I remember thinking, "What is wrong with these people?" Sitting in the hot sun for hours at a clip, smashing steamed crustaceans with a mallet and then sorting through razor-sharp bits of shell and crab entrails for a thimbleful of meat seemed more like some sort of torture than a good time.
NEWS
By MARIE GULLARD | January 15, 2006
Kim and Mark Hardy's townhouse in the Castlestone section of White Marsh is a fine example of individuality displayed through the use of color, fabric and treasured pieces. The Hardys, now in their 40s, bought the townhouse in October 1993 for $124,000. The three-bedroom home - 20-feet-by-32-feet - features a finished basement with backyard walkout, two full bathrooms and two half baths. Mark Hardy said the couple has spent $65,000 on lighting upgrades, hardwood flooring, wallpaper, paint and window boxes.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown and Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2009
W hen the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation held its "35 Under 35 Finest" event at the B&O Railroad Museum, the 35 community volunteers being honored weren't the only winners. Anastasia Allen was a style standout in the crowd. The 31-year-old East Baltimore resident might work in a white coat during the day as a dental hygienist for Dr. Martin Levin, but she loves to dress up when she's on her own time. "Looking good always makes me feel better about myself," she says. Allen loves a "sexy chic" look, with a particular passion for handbags and shoes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
Rodney G. Stieff, former chairman of the board and CEO of Kirk-Stieff Co., which was the oldest silversmith firm in the country, died Tuesday of kidney cancer at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson. The former longtime Orchards resident was 87. "He was a very good businessman, and he helped from the standpoint of the financial end," said a brother, Charles C. Stieff II, former executive vice president of the company, who was in charge of its wholesale division. "And he really knew our business, especially from the engineering and manufacturing end. I was in the selling end of it," said Mr. Stieff, who lives in Cockeysville.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen | December 17, 1996
Hey, if you wish big, mean Baltimore could be just a little like small, friendly Mayberry, N.C., this gift's for you. "Say 'Hey' to these Happy Mayberry Accessories!," offered this holiday season Hawthorne Village sculptures, maker of those ubiquitous Christmas villages. "Bring your Mayberry town to life!" Hark, do tell us more! The $21.90 "Have a Great Day" set, for example, features Opie dashing to school and Aunt Bee in her Sunday best, headin' for church -- a sweet, timeless TV image captured in handcrafted pewter figurines.
NEWS
May 20, 1991
Two pewter plates and a pewter candlestick holder stolen from the Mount Clare Mansion in Carroll Park were recovered yesterday in a vacant house near the park.Police said the items were removed after someone broke a window in the kitchen of the mansion sometime between 4:30 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. yesterday. The mansion is in the 1500 block of Washington Blvd. in South Baltimore.Acting on a tip, police yesterday afternoon went to a vacant house near the park, where they recovered the items.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | September 8, 1996
A. H. Heisey & Co., the famous American glassworks, opened in Newark, Ohio, in 1896.August Henry Heisey served in the Union Army during the Civil War and fought in the Battle of Gettysburg. When he returned home, he married the daughter of George Duncan, a glassmaker, and joined the family business.Their tablewares included some famous pressed-glass patterns such as Shell and Tassel. The Duncan company became part of the U.S. Glass Co. in 1891.Heisey left U.S. Glass and started mining in Colorado, but by 1896 he returned to the glass industry.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown and Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2009
W hen the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation held its "35 Under 35 Finest" event at the B&O Railroad Museum, the 35 community volunteers being honored weren't the only winners. Anastasia Allen was a style standout in the crowd. The 31-year-old East Baltimore resident might work in a white coat during the day as a dental hygienist for Dr. Martin Levin, but she loves to dress up when she's on her own time. "Looking good always makes me feel better about myself," she says. Allen loves a "sexy chic" look, with a particular passion for handbags and shoes.
NEWS
By MARIE GULLARD | January 15, 2006
Kim and Mark Hardy's townhouse in the Castlestone section of White Marsh is a fine example of individuality displayed through the use of color, fabric and treasured pieces. The Hardys, now in their 40s, bought the townhouse in October 1993 for $124,000. The three-bedroom home - 20-feet-by-32-feet - features a finished basement with backyard walkout, two full bathrooms and two half baths. Mark Hardy said the couple has spent $65,000 on lighting upgrades, hardwood flooring, wallpaper, paint and window boxes.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and By Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | August 29, 2004
To be honest, there are almost no unequivocally silver-foliaged plants. There are silvery green, frosty blue, ghostly purple, pewtered-burgundy, and even silvery rose. But while every silver-foliaged plant has a drop of color underlying the pearled leaves, their overall effect is one of shimmering light. "Silver leaves catch the moonlight," says landscape architect KenSchmidt, a principal with Mahan Rykiel Associates in Baltimore. "They're nice for edges and walkways, so at nighttime you can really see them."
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen | December 17, 1996
Hey, if you wish big, mean Baltimore could be just a little like small, friendly Mayberry, N.C., this gift's for you. "Say 'Hey' to these Happy Mayberry Accessories!," offered this holiday season Hawthorne Village sculptures, maker of those ubiquitous Christmas villages. "Bring your Mayberry town to life!" Hark, do tell us more! The $21.90 "Have a Great Day" set, for example, features Opie dashing to school and Aunt Bee in her Sunday best, headin' for church -- a sweet, timeless TV image captured in handcrafted pewter figurines.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Staff Writer | January 17, 1993
Having fun at homeHome furnishings manufacturers realize we all need a little fun in our lives, so the newest furniture, fabrics and designs for 1993 are definitely upbeat.You see it in the shelter magazines -- when Metropolitan Home features a house described as "comfortable, colorful, good-humored and conducive to play," for instance. You see it in the resurgent popularity of folk art and trompe l'oeil, and influences such as Indian contributing bright color and lively patterns.Much of the newest furniture and fabrics is casual, with tongue-in-cheek designs like postcard, book and playing-card prints.
FEATURES
By LINELL SMITH and LINELL SMITH,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1999
As Herman Charles Engel Jr. walks through the Kirk-Stieff factory, there is an eerie silence. The formidable hammering machines stand mute, hundreds of tools and dies await reassignment while employees tend to final chores. It's like the lull after a memorable dinner party, a few people reliving the high points while they clear the table.The 76-year-old die maker stops to chat with Patricia Flanagan. She is polishing up the last order of mint julep tumblers, another Kirk-Stieff product that has helped smooth out life's rough edges.
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