Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPews
IN THE NEWS

Pews

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Joe Eaton and Joe Eaton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2004
When Dulcie Carey joined St. George's Episcopal Church in Perryman in 1973, members packed the 27 pews for 10 a.m. service on Sundays. "If we didn't leave home in time, we couldn't find a seat," Carey said. But times have changed for St. George's. Most pews are now empty on Sundays. The church has about 40 members, most with gray or white hair. On a good day, 30 attend church. Five children attend Sunday school. Carey said membership declined slowly as people moved away, joined larger churches or died.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 19, 2013
Whenever my sister calls me Doll or Doll Baby, eyebrows go up. They also go up when we call a blond, middle-aged man, who is like a brother, Precious. Much of the language of families and friends comes from what others have called us, from words coined by children or from overhearing others talk. In our family, Doll is the short form of Doll Baby, used by a hairdresser when my niece was small. After her scalp-yanking haircut, my niece told my sister and me, "Doll Baby is never cutting my hair again.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2004
A choir will sing where school plays are staged and graduates receive their diplomas. Wreaths and banners proclaiming the Christmas message will adorn the walls and stage. The rows of seats in the Franklin High School auditorium will serve as pews. For 90 minutes this evening, the Reisterstown school's auditorium will be a house of worship, not just a public multipurpose room. Northwest Baptist Church, where lightning struck and caused a fire that destroyed the sanctuary in July, will hold its Christmas Eve service at the high school at 6 p.m. Rose Karolenko, a telecommunications engineer from Glyndon and a Northwest Baptist member, said making the school room feel like a church will be a challenge, but an exciting one. "In some ways it's good to get people out of their comfort zones and realize what's important," she said.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 11, 2013
This is the time of year when I feel a bit tweedy, a bit green in the wool, a bit Irish, even though the Rodricks clan from which I descend was Portuguese (Rodrigues) and not Irish (Roderick). From years of experience, I know something about the wide interest in things Irish - this tendency the non-Irish have to identify with the freckled people. It's a seasonal condition. St. Patrick's Day, falling as it does on the cusp of spring, catches even the most miserable among us in a hopeful and ready mood.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 1996
THEY SAY THAT EACH generation builds upon the foundations laid by those who came before. The Haight family of Sykesville has been doing just that since 1888, both literally and figuratively for five generations.In 1888, James Randolph Weer opened a funeral home on Spout Hill Road in Sykesville and moved the business to the town's Main Street after his son, C. Harry Weer, joined him at the turn of the century. When James retired in 1932, Luther Haight began working at the funeral home and the Weer-Haight partnership was formed in 1951.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2005
Raymond K. Smoot was mourned yesterday as an old friend and family member whose life should have been lived better than it was, but who did not deserve to die violently, at 51, in an altercation with state correctional officers. "It's just sad how it happened; it was unnecessary," said Michica Dashiell, 42, the mother of Smoot's two youngest children. "If it could happen to my loved one, it could happen to anyone's loved one." She spent much of the time during and after yesterday morning's funeral outside Greater New Hope Baptist Church with her children, smoking and talking to anyone who would listen, calling for "swift justice."
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | August 16, 1992
Historic St. John's Episcopal Church in Ellicott City is going back to the future.Built in the late 1800s, the stone church at 9120 Frederick Road is having its 40-foot ceiling repainted and having its altar arches restenciled to resemble their original look.Friday morning, artists were busy painting and stenciling on and underneath the tall scaffolding as a paint bucket was pulled on a rope to the top.Suzanne Ravgiala, a sign painter, said the experience has taken her to new heights."I'm used to the height now," she said.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 19, 1995
DO YOU BELIEVE it's possible to make everything old new again? The members of St. Paul's United Methodist Church in Sykesville certainly do, and they now have the building to prove it.After spending the past 6 1/2 months holding services in the cafeteria of nearby Sykesville Middle School, the congregation celebrated its first service back in the renovated church Sunday.The entire inside of the structure, a fixture on Sykesville's Main Street since 1889, was completely renovated and brought up to current building codes.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
Inside Baltimore's St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church early Saturday, the Rev. Michael Pastrikos stood on the dais and chanted prayers before an ornate altar adorned with icons of holy figures. The smell of spiced incense filled the dimly lit sanctuary as the faithful slipped into pews and counted down the hours until their Easter celebration would begin. They were among the many Orthodox Christians and others around the world and throughout the region celebrating the holiest of weekends using a Julian calendar different from that observed by other denominations.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1996
HARLEM, N.Y. -- After decades of watching their audiences dwindle, the preachers of Harlem are celebrating a boom. Their pews are packed again.But the audiences look a lot different from the way they did in the neighborhood's heyday. During the 1920s and '30s, the people crowding Memorial Baptist Church and the Kelly Temple Church of God in Christ were African-American men and women in suits and silk hats. Today, most of the people filling the sanctuaries are white tourists in jeans, sweat shirts and sneakers.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | November 8, 2012
There are a bunch of companies in Maryland (plus Johns Hopkins ) that are focused on mobile health -- using mobile devices to encourage healthy behaviors -- and the latest poll from the Pew Internet and American Life Project should be encouraging for them. The Pew report found that nearly one-third -- 31 percent -- of cellphone users had used their device to access health information. That was nearly double the 17 percent who said they did so two years ago, according to Pew. ( You can read the report here.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
A Pew study on coverage of the presidential race reveals a generally negative press for both candidates -- and a particularly hostile social media. It also catalogs a sharp shift toward more favorable coverage for GOP candidate Mitt Romney after President Obama's poor first debate performance. Obama does, however, get a slight edge in favorable coverage over the length of the study. The first finding might seem like only piling up of data on the obvious, but if you go inside the numbers and think about them, there is much to chew on. I think the resolutely negative tone on Twitter and Facebook especially is a real problem for democracy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
In writing about the Pew study released today, I was struck by the big story of how negative coverage on several levels of presidential politics had become. I think this is big trouble for democracy, especially the hostile level of discourse in social media. And that it's something the media need to address collectively after the election. But here's one of several fascinating smaller findings of the study that are kind of stunning -- even if they seem obvious and ho-hum to some of my more jaded, postmodern, aren't-we-cleverly-ironic colleagues: ON MSNBC, the ratio of negative to positive stories on GOP candidate Mitt Romney was 71 to 3. That's not a news channel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2012
Pew reports that "large majorities of Americans" are following the Olympics on TV, online and on social networks in a new survey released today. Among the most compelling findings is that 76 percent of those surveyed believe NBC is doing an "excellent" or "good" job in coverage. That is certainly at odds with perception of widespread criticism in social media, with some analysts saying there are "millions" of disgruntled audience members. Also of note, the finding that 68 percent "say they are watching events in the evening after they have occurred.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
If you're aiming to be upwardly mobile, living in Maryland might help. The state is one of the best in the country for moving on up, what the study calls positive economic mobility, a new study by the Pew Charitable Trusts concludes. States doing better than average are largely in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast, while those doing worse are in the South, according to the report, released Wednesday. Researchers at Pew's ongoing Economic Mobility Project say they're trying to answer a big question: Is the American dream alive and well?
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
Inside Baltimore's St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church early Saturday, the Rev. Michael Pastrikos stood on the dais and chanted prayers before an ornate altar adorned with icons of holy figures. The smell of spiced incense filled the dimly lit sanctuary as the faithful slipped into pews and counted down the hours until their Easter celebration would begin. They were among the many Orthodox Christians and others around the world and throughout the region celebrating the holiest of weekends using a Julian calendar different from that observed by other denominations.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 11, 2013
This is the time of year when I feel a bit tweedy, a bit green in the wool, a bit Irish, even though the Rodricks clan from which I descend was Portuguese (Rodrigues) and not Irish (Roderick). From years of experience, I know something about the wide interest in things Irish - this tendency the non-Irish have to identify with the freckled people. It's a seasonal condition. St. Patrick's Day, falling as it does on the cusp of spring, catches even the most miserable among us in a hopeful and ready mood.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | April 5, 2012
About a fifth of American adults have read an ebook in the past year, a figure likely helped along by the recent holiday surge in the sale of tablet and e-reader devices, according to a report from the Pew Internet and American Life Project. Before the holidays last year, 17 percent of adults had read an ebook in the previous year. That number jumped to 21 percent after the holiday. E-book readers are more voracious than non-e-book readers, the study found. E-book readers read an average of 24 books over the previous year, whereas those who read paper-based books averaged 15 books.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2011
Just because news and information comes from a non-profit operation rather than corporately-owned one doesn't mean it is ideologically-free, disinterested and independent reporting that citizens can automatically trust. Quite the contrary, some of the non-profit “news” operations that have sprung up as traditional news outlets have disappeared in recent years are funded by entities with an ideological agenda that is reflected in the informational content on the site. Those are among the most important findings of an illuminating study of non-profit news published Monday by the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.