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NEWS
December 23, 2007
Man-made and natural disasters dominated the list of the public's top news stories in 2007, Pew Research Center surveys show. Nearly half of Americans tracked news about the shootings of 33 students at Virginia Tech University very closely, while nearly as many paid very close attention to reports on the Minneapolis bridge collapse and the California wildfires. As was the case in 2006, however, the rising price of gasoline attracted the largest audience of any news story. In May, 52% of Americans said they tracked rising prices at the pump very closely.
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FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
The generation gap that many credit with moving the needle on same-sex marriage apparently crosses party lines. According to a new Pew Research Center survey , 61 percent of Republicans under 30 -- a clear majority -- favor allowing same-sex marriage, while 35 percent oppose it. That's a marked difference from both their older counterparts and the party at large. Only 27 percent of Republicans over 50 support allowing gay and lesbian couples to wed, according to the poll, compared with 39 percent approval from Republicans overall.
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FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | August 7, 2002
Some clerics admonish their congregants: Hate the sin, love the sinner. So what's the media corollary: Mistrust the news, love the anchor? A study released this week by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press found that levels of public trust toward the media have largely dipped to the uneasy levels found before last September's terrorist attacks. After the attacks, public faith in the media rose with admiration for government officials, religious institutions and other major parts of the establishment.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | April 12, 2012
More young adults are moving back in with their parents than ever before, and if a recent think tank report is correct, both generations are OK with this. The reasons are often economic, of course. Our children can't find jobs that pay enough to allow them to live on their own — and in the style to which they became accustomed under our roofs. But they aren't down about it, according to the Pew Research Center. A significant majority say they are satisfied with their living arrangements and upbeat about the future.
NEWS
May 19, 1996
ASSESSING TELEVISION'S role in defeating the Communist empire, the writer Timothy Garton Ash called the medium "the world's third superpower." The whole world stood with Dan Rather in Tiananmen Square as demonstrators erected a replica of the Statue of Liberty. Chinese students in California faxed information and tactical advice back to their colleagues in Beijing. The world seemed truly to have shrunk to a "globalvillage."But television's reign as global town square seems already to be waning.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | April 12, 2012
More young adults are moving back in with their parents than ever before, and if a recent think tank report is correct, both generations are OK with this. The reasons are often economic, of course. Our children can't find jobs that pay enough to allow them to live on their own — and in the style to which they became accustomed under our roofs. But they aren't down about it, according to the Pew Research Center. A significant majority say they are satisfied with their living arrangements and upbeat about the future.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 9, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Mothers today are having such a hard time balancing the demands of family and work that they are looking back wistfully to the traditional "Leave It to Beaver"-type family structure and doubting their own success in raising their children.In a survey of American women by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, 41 percent said they thought that a family in which the father worked and the mother stayed at home was best for raising children. Only 17 percent said it was %J beneficial for children and society to have mothers work outside the home, and 37 percent said it made no difference.
NEWS
May 19, 1999
AS AN institution, the news business always wants to be its own judge and jury. How, then, will it react to a poll showing that working reporters and editors often agree with their critics? A basic summary of the survey: News-gathering organizations often don't deserve the public's confidence. Turning professionally critical eyes on their own performance, 552 newspapers, magazines, radio and television journalists offered up a grim assessment of their work product. Stories were often error-ridden, sloppy and careless, they said.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 28, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Most Americans may know deep down that the impeachment trial of President Clinton is the stuff of history.But it is not a water-cooler story."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2004
With religion playing a more visible role in this year's tight presidential race than at any other time in recent memory, Americans want a president with strong religious beliefs, but are also leery of injecting too much religion into the campaign, according to a poll released yesterday. The national survey by the Pew Research Center and the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life shows that voters see Republicans as friendlier to religion than Democrats, but the public is also turned off by attempts to use churches as surrogate political organizations, as some have accused the Bush campaign of doing.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 8, 2008
I blew five bucks in a liquor store on Mega Millions. The jackpot was $120 million Tuesday night. By morning, I realized that I did not have the winning numbers, and did not even come close, and that I might have a gambling problem - the problem being that I never win. OK, I exaggerate. I've come out ahead at Pimlico twice since 1978 and, in 1980, I won a case of King Syrup in a Sons of Italy linguini-and-crab dinner raffle. I didn't know what to do with King Syrup, so I put it in the basement next to a supply of Quaker State 10W-40.
NEWS
December 23, 2007
Man-made and natural disasters dominated the list of the public's top news stories in 2007, Pew Research Center surveys show. Nearly half of Americans tracked news about the shootings of 33 students at Virginia Tech University very closely, while nearly as many paid very close attention to reports on the Minneapolis bridge collapse and the California wildfires. As was the case in 2006, however, the rising price of gasoline attracted the largest audience of any news story. In May, 52% of Americans said they tracked rising prices at the pump very closely.
NEWS
By Barbara Shelly | August 21, 2007
Goodbye, Karl Rove. Hello, Rudy Giuliani. Freeze this moment. The national Republican Party is suddenly looking good to me. Mr. Rove is leaving Washington for Texas, having abandoned his bold dream of a permanent Republican majority anchored by its conservative base. Mr. Giuliani, a centrist candidate, is sitting atop the party's nationwide opinion polls. These are developments that give faint hope to a Midwesterner who has watched what happens when the grip of the Republican "base" becomes a vise.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | March 19, 2007
Four years into the war, about 90 million Americans remain committed to the combat mission in Iraq, a significant proportion of the population whose views are being overshadowed by the growing push to bring the troops home. While they no longer constitute a majority, supporters of the war are convinced that the United States has an important task to complete even if the end is nowhere in sight. In dozens of interviews across Maryland in recent days, those who favor the war said the risks of leaving Iraq outweigh those of pressing ahead.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,Sun Columnist | January 30, 2007
Opposites don't necessarily attract, particularly when it comes to money. A recent report found that nearly two-thirds of spouses were on the same page about saving. That is, they agreed to save, or they agreed not to. But they agreed. "It's a piece of folk wisdom" that opposites attract, says Cary Funk, a senior researcher at Pew Research Center. "It's more common for people to be attracted to those who resemble themselves." So, in the real world, a Montague would marry a Montague; a Capulet, a Capulet.
NEWS
By Jodie T. Allen and Carroll Doherty | December 31, 2006
Jodie T. Allen is senior editor at the Pew Research Center. Carroll Doherty is associate director of the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press. Here is their assessment of how public opinion shaped events in America last year. Once again, public opinion played a major role in the most important news stories of the year. Some of the strongest 2006 trends in public opinion carried over from previous years - notably, growing concern about the Iraq war and mounting dissatisfaction with the performance of the Republican-controlled Congress.
NEWS
By Barbara Shelly | August 21, 2007
Goodbye, Karl Rove. Hello, Rudy Giuliani. Freeze this moment. The national Republican Party is suddenly looking good to me. Mr. Rove is leaving Washington for Texas, having abandoned his bold dream of a permanent Republican majority anchored by its conservative base. Mr. Giuliani, a centrist candidate, is sitting atop the party's nationwide opinion polls. These are developments that give faint hope to a Midwesterner who has watched what happens when the grip of the Republican "base" becomes a vise.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,Sun Columnist | January 30, 2007
Opposites don't necessarily attract, particularly when it comes to money. A recent report found that nearly two-thirds of spouses were on the same page about saving. That is, they agreed to save, or they agreed not to. But they agreed. "It's a piece of folk wisdom" that opposites attract, says Cary Funk, a senior researcher at Pew Research Center. "It's more common for people to be attracted to those who resemble themselves." So, in the real world, a Montague would marry a Montague; a Capulet, a Capulet.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2004
With religion playing a more visible role in this year's tight presidential race than at any other time in recent memory, Americans want a president with strong religious beliefs, but are also leery of injecting too much religion into the campaign, according to a poll released yesterday. The national survey by the Pew Research Center and the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life shows that voters see Republicans as friendlier to religion than Democrats, but the public is also turned off by attempts to use churches as surrogate political organizations, as some have accused the Bush campaign of doing.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 17, 2004
WASHINGTON - International opinion of the United States has worsened since America invaded Iraq a year ago, with suspicions about President Bush's war on terror rising even among key European allies, a nine-nation poll has found. Even in Britain, the Bush administration's closest partner, favorable views have fallen sharply, according to the survey. It also found that Europeans increasingly back a foreign policy more independent of the United States. Anger toward the United States remains pervasive in the Muslim world.
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