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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 2, 1997
The chief executive of a Baltimore-based foundation has been named to lead a new nonprofit organization that will develop strategies to help young people considered vulnerable to the effects of social ills such as crime, poverty and poor educational resources.Rick R. Little, head of the International Youth Foundation since its founding in 1990, reportedly was chosen by retired Army Gen. Colin L. Powell to serve as chief executive officer of America's Promise -- The Alliance for Youth, which will help young people through volunteer efforts, funding or in-kind services.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Seventy miles off Ocean City , scientists aboard the federal research vessel Henry B. Bigelow are exploring a lush underwater landscape that until recently few would have imagined - colorful corals clinging to the rocky slopes of deep-sea canyons. On this and other research cruises, remotely guided submersible cameras have captured scenes of bubblegum corals, sea whips and more growing in the dark, hundreds to thousands of feet below the Atlantic Ocean's surface. Other smaller patches dot the ocean floor in shallower waters closer to shore.
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NEWS
August 10, 2005
Dr. Thomas W. Langfitt, 78, former head of the Pew Charitable Trusts, died Sunday of miliary tuberculosis at his home in Wynnewood, Pa. Dr. Langfitt was president of the Pew trusts from 1987 to 1994 and chief executive of the Glenmede Trust Co., which handles the trusts' assets, from 1987 to 1995. He also served as chairman of the University of Pennsylvania's neurosurgery department from 1968 to 1987. After he retired from Pew and Glenmede, Dr. Langfitt, a 1949 graduate of the Johns Hopkins University medical school, became president of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
Maryland officials pulled back a proposed regulation Monday aimed at reducing farm runoff polluting the Chesapeake Bay after chicken growers warned it could cripple the state's lucrative poultry industry if imposed now. The state Department of Agriculture announced it had withdrawn its request to make immediate changes to rules governing where farmers may use chicken manure to fertilize their crops, two days before a scheduled legislative hearing...
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
Maryland officials pulled back a proposed regulation Monday aimed at reducing farm runoff polluting the Chesapeake Bay after chicken growers warned it could cripple the state's lucrative poultry industry if imposed now. The state Department of Agriculture announced it had withdrawn its request to make immediate changes to rules governing where farmers may use chicken manure to fertilize their crops, two days before a scheduled legislative hearing...
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
If you're aiming to be upwardly mobile, living in Maryland might help. The state is one of the best in the country for moving on up, what the study calls positive economic mobility, a new study by the Pew Charitable Trusts concludes. States doing better than average are largely in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast, while those doing worse are in the South, according to the report, released Wednesday. Researchers at Pew's ongoing Economic Mobility Project say they're trying to answer a big question: Is the American dream alive and well?
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1997
An article Monday incorrectly reported the number of projects sponsored by the Pew Center for Civic Journalism. In the four years since its establishment, the Pew Center has helped support 47 journalistic projects.The Sun regrets the error.PHILADELPHIA -- During the musicians' strike of the Philadelphia Orchestra last year, the Pew Charitable Trusts withdrew financial support from the orchestra. It cheered the musicians.Pew -- with assets of $3.7 billion, the country's sixth-richest foundation -- was not out to help the union.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Seventy miles off Ocean City , scientists aboard the federal research vessel Henry B. Bigelow are exploring a lush underwater landscape that until recently few would have imagined - colorful corals clinging to the rocky slopes of deep-sea canyons. On this and other research cruises, remotely guided submersible cameras have captured scenes of bubblegum corals, sea whips and more growing in the dark, hundreds to thousands of feet below the Atlantic Ocean's surface. Other smaller patches dot the ocean floor in shallower waters closer to shore.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2002
The Phoebe R. Berman Bioethics Institute at Johns Hopkins University has received a $9.9 million grant to establish a center for education and research on the fast-moving field of genetic science. The three-year grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts will "dramatically" increase the size and scope of the small institute, which was established in 1995 to examine ethical questions in medical research and patient care, said Ruth R. Faden, its executive director. The Genetics and Public Policy Center, to be located in Washington, will be directed by Kathy Hudson, assistant director of the National Human Genome Research Institute at the National Institutes of Health.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 6, 1997
Cartoonist Jules Feiffer, who quit the Village Voice last week over a salary dispute, will become a senior fellow in the National Arts Journalism Program at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism. He said he would use the fellowship to "extend the form I'm known for, the cartoon, into a more narrative form."BTC Feiffer, 68, said he will also be working on a screenplay.The program was established in 1996 with a $3.5 million grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts, to improve coverage of culture and the arts in the national media.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
If you're aiming to be upwardly mobile, living in Maryland might help. The state is one of the best in the country for moving on up, what the study calls positive economic mobility, a new study by the Pew Charitable Trusts concludes. States doing better than average are largely in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast, while those doing worse are in the South, according to the report, released Wednesday. Researchers at Pew's ongoing Economic Mobility Project say they're trying to answer a big question: Is the American dream alive and well?
NEWS
August 10, 2005
Dr. Thomas W. Langfitt, 78, former head of the Pew Charitable Trusts, died Sunday of miliary tuberculosis at his home in Wynnewood, Pa. Dr. Langfitt was president of the Pew trusts from 1987 to 1994 and chief executive of the Glenmede Trust Co., which handles the trusts' assets, from 1987 to 1995. He also served as chairman of the University of Pennsylvania's neurosurgery department from 1968 to 1987. After he retired from Pew and Glenmede, Dr. Langfitt, a 1949 graduate of the Johns Hopkins University medical school, became president of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2002
The Phoebe R. Berman Bioethics Institute at Johns Hopkins University has received a $9.9 million grant to establish a center for education and research on the fast-moving field of genetic science. The three-year grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts will "dramatically" increase the size and scope of the small institute, which was established in 1995 to examine ethical questions in medical research and patient care, said Ruth R. Faden, its executive director. The Genetics and Public Policy Center, to be located in Washington, will be directed by Kathy Hudson, assistant director of the National Human Genome Research Institute at the National Institutes of Health.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 2, 1997
The chief executive of a Baltimore-based foundation has been named to lead a new nonprofit organization that will develop strategies to help young people considered vulnerable to the effects of social ills such as crime, poverty and poor educational resources.Rick R. Little, head of the International Youth Foundation since its founding in 1990, reportedly was chosen by retired Army Gen. Colin L. Powell to serve as chief executive officer of America's Promise -- The Alliance for Youth, which will help young people through volunteer efforts, funding or in-kind services.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1997
An article Monday incorrectly reported the number of projects sponsored by the Pew Center for Civic Journalism. In the four years since its establishment, the Pew Center has helped support 47 journalistic projects.The Sun regrets the error.PHILADELPHIA -- During the musicians' strike of the Philadelphia Orchestra last year, the Pew Charitable Trusts withdrew financial support from the orchestra. It cheered the musicians.Pew -- with assets of $3.7 billion, the country's sixth-richest foundation -- was not out to help the union.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | November 7, 2012
Schools are contributing to the childhood obesity problem by selling unhealthy snacks, new research has found. A study by The Pew Charitable Trusts and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation found that most of the country's secondary schools do not offer fruits and vegetables as snack options. Fewer than half of secondary schools in 49 states sold fruits and vegetables in snack venues in 2010, according to the study. Chocolate, candy bars and chips were more common. The researchers found that while many states reduced the availability of  high-calorie snacks in secondary schools between 2002 and 2008, the efforts have since waned.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 11, 2001
Maryland got the nation's best grades for school standards and accountability but failing marks on school climate and funding equity in a 50-state report card issued yesterday by the school news publication Education Week. The fifth annual Quality Counts, a national survey of educational indicators, gave high marks to the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program for the quality of its curriculum standards and tests. New York was the only other state to receive an A, while five states - Minnesota, Rhode Island, North Dakota, Montana and Iowa - got F's. The school climate grade was based on factors including class size, student absenteeism and the number of open-enrollment schools and charter schools in a state.
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