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Petunias

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By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | May 11, 2003
While petunias have been gracing garden beds like softly ruffled Victorian petticoats for nearly two centuries, their appeal is not only undimmed but growing. "Petunias are one of the most popular bedding plants," says Claire Burrows, vice president of Thompson and Morgan Seedsmen, Inc., in Jackson, N.J. "There are so many different varieties: frilly ones, doubles, the regular single ones. And they come in so many different colors that everyone can find a petunia that goes with their color scheme."
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NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
The tips of my red raspberry canes wilted. They've always been so healthy; what's happening? It's not lack of water. The female raspberry cane borer is a beetle that punctures the cane about 6 inches below the tip to lay its eggs, causing tips to wilt and die. When larvae hatch, they tunnel down the cane and by the second year they are damaging the base and roots. The remedy is simple: prune out all wilted tips below the larvae. You can slit open a cane to see how far they have progressed or just prune out at least several inches below the dead tip. Destroy pruned tips.
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FEATURES
By Kathy Van Mullekom and Kathy Van Mullekom,NEWPORT NEWS DAILY PRESS | April 26, 1998
Petunias are among the most versatile annuals in the landscape. Use them to edge a perennial border, conceal the yellow dying foliage of bulbs or to dress up the edges of a vegetable garden.The frilly, fancy flowers of petunias also look good in container bouquets, spilling out over the edges along with ivy set among asparagus fern and tall, spiky dracaena.Put petunias in mixed plantings in window boxes. The cascading or spreading types combine well with salvias and geraniums; the grandifloras mix well with sweet alyssum, ivy-leaved geranium and port-ulaca.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN REIMER | August 6, 2009
It is August in the garden, and the energy of spring has evaporated like the dew - for the garden and the gardener. What looked so fresh and promising in May looks scraggly and wilted now, and the punishing heat and drought of late summer in the Mid-Atlantic saps the will to do anything about it. If I wait a little longer, the gardener tells herself, it will be time for mums and this awkward phase in the garden cycle will be forgotten. In spring, we haunt the garden centers and purchase what is blooming at the moment, doubling down our investment in early-season color.
NEWS
By Judy Chernak | November 6, 1991
Fall.Leaves float orangely,Green tomatoes droop on browned vines,Purple petunias pout in their pots, and drop.Time itself freefalls:"Spring forward, Fall backward,"Instruct the daylight to save itselfFor my early morning walks.Winds dance wickedly, witchinglyBuffeting loose wisps and uncovered ears.Toes still warm, fingers numbing in$ the brusque breezes.Sniffles starting. Shoulders snuggle intoSuddenly sparse-woven sweatshirt.It was warm enough when I stepped out . . .How thoughtless of me to forget the nature ofFall.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
The tips of my red raspberry canes wilted. They've always been so healthy; what's happening? It's not lack of water. The female raspberry cane borer is a beetle that punctures the cane about 6 inches below the tip to lay its eggs, causing tips to wilt and die. When larvae hatch, they tunnel down the cane and by the second year they are damaging the base and roots. The remedy is simple: prune out all wilted tips below the larvae. You can slit open a cane to see how far they have progressed or just prune out at least several inches below the dead tip. Destroy pruned tips.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1999
Harry Millstein knows his flowers.The owner of Greta's Gardens in Elkridge knows that cauliflower and broccoli seeds planted in the fall can withstand Maryland winters. He knows that pansies thrive during the spring and fall and must be kept in the shade during the summer.Millstein also knows that marigolds and petunias need sunlight and that if he moves them to a covered porch in front of his nursery as Howard County zoning officials have ordered him to do, the annuals -- and his business -- will perish.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2004
It's the time of year when, no matter how often or early Joseph and Lillian Lawson rise to water and feed them, the annual petunias that brighten a dreary strip of a Baltimore street begin their slow droop toward death. For neighbors on the block-long stretch of Greenmount Avenue between Biddle and Chase streets, it means the end of another season's display of beauty, pride and defiance against the decay and troubles around them. Petunias - purple, lavender, hot pink, white, red - spill from a yellow pot the Lawsons fashioned, in true Baltimore style, from an old tire.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton and Ann Egerton,Special to the Sun | April 30, 2000
Over the years, gardeners have trekked to plant centers and bought annuals for their gardens, and year after year, the annuals have been much the same: petunias, zinnias and marigolds. They're all fairly reliable plants, and, assuming that your garden is in a sunny location and your soil is average, it's been a satisfactory experience. During the '80s, perennials became the rage (some do well in shade, too), and gardeners began buying plants like echinacea, Astilbe, hosta, Heliopsis and Asclepias tuberosa, just to name a few. These cost a bit more than annuals, but they returned every year (well, usually)
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1996
As a boy in Chicago, Robert J. Griesbach eyed the flowers his geneticist father was cross-breeding and asked himself, why ARE roses red and violets blue?As a plant geneticist, Griesbach has spent 15 years at the Agricultural Research Service in Beltsville trying to answer that question.Now, the Ellicott City man thinks he has the answer, one that vaults genetic research over a decades-old barrier and that could open up a new world of striking, first-of-their-kind flower colors -- blue roses, red Easter lilies, pumpkin-colored petunias.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2004
It's the time of year when, no matter how often or early Joseph and Lillian Lawson rise to water and feed them, the annual petunias that brighten a dreary strip of a Baltimore street begin their slow droop toward death. For neighbors on the block-long stretch of Greenmount Avenue between Biddle and Chase streets, it means the end of another season's display of beauty, pride and defiance against the decay and troubles around them. Petunias - purple, lavender, hot pink, white, red - spill from a yellow pot the Lawsons fashioned, in true Baltimore style, from an old tire.
NEWS
By Nancy O'Donnell and Nancy O'Donnell,New York Times News Service | January 25, 2004
Annuals live only for one growing season so they need to be tops in performance due to this small window of opportunity to strut their stuff. Winning plants chosen by All-America Selections and Fleuroselect are just that; easy to maintain, hard working, and disease resistant. A winner of both the AAS and Fleuroselect Gold Medal is a celosia named 'Fresh Look Red.' There are two types of celosia. The winner belongs to the crested or Celosia plumosa family, which features fluffy, feathery plumes.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | May 11, 2003
While petunias have been gracing garden beds like softly ruffled Victorian petticoats for nearly two centuries, their appeal is not only undimmed but growing. "Petunias are one of the most popular bedding plants," says Claire Burrows, vice president of Thompson and Morgan Seedsmen, Inc., in Jackson, N.J. "There are so many different varieties: frilly ones, doubles, the regular single ones. And they come in so many different colors that everyone can find a petunia that goes with their color scheme."
NEWS
By Ann Egerton and Ann Egerton,Special to the Sun | April 30, 2000
Over the years, gardeners have trekked to plant centers and bought annuals for their gardens, and year after year, the annuals have been much the same: petunias, zinnias and marigolds. They're all fairly reliable plants, and, assuming that your garden is in a sunny location and your soil is average, it's been a satisfactory experience. During the '80s, perennials became the rage (some do well in shade, too), and gardeners began buying plants like echinacea, Astilbe, hosta, Heliopsis and Asclepias tuberosa, just to name a few. These cost a bit more than annuals, but they returned every year (well, usually)
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1999
Harry Millstein knows his flowers.The owner of Greta's Gardens in Elkridge knows that cauliflower and broccoli seeds planted in the fall can withstand Maryland winters. He knows that pansies thrive during the spring and fall and must be kept in the shade during the summer.Millstein also knows that marigolds and petunias need sunlight and that if he moves them to a covered porch in front of his nursery as Howard County zoning officials have ordered him to do, the annuals -- and his business -- will perish.
FEATURES
By Kathy Van Mullekom and Kathy Van Mullekom,NEWPORT NEWS DAILY PRESS | April 26, 1998
Petunias are among the most versatile annuals in the landscape. Use them to edge a perennial border, conceal the yellow dying foliage of bulbs or to dress up the edges of a vegetable garden.The frilly, fancy flowers of petunias also look good in container bouquets, spilling out over the edges along with ivy set among asparagus fern and tall, spiky dracaena.Put petunias in mixed plantings in window boxes. The cascading or spreading types combine well with salvias and geraniums; the grandifloras mix well with sweet alyssum, ivy-leaved geranium and port-ulaca.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN REIMER | August 6, 2009
It is August in the garden, and the energy of spring has evaporated like the dew - for the garden and the gardener. What looked so fresh and promising in May looks scraggly and wilted now, and the punishing heat and drought of late summer in the Mid-Atlantic saps the will to do anything about it. If I wait a little longer, the gardener tells herself, it will be time for mums and this awkward phase in the garden cycle will be forgotten. In spring, we haunt the garden centers and purchase what is blooming at the moment, doubling down our investment in early-season color.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | August 28, 1993
Pat Jeddock just adores purple. Purple ice trays and purple window shades. A purple picket fence and heart-shaped purple petunias. And, oh yes, a Charles Village house that's as purple (well, it's really more of a dark lavender) as possible."Purple's been my favorite color ever since I can remember," says Ms. Jeddock, 29, while beating the summer heat in her purple flip-flops. "Eventually, inside and out, the house is going to be purple."But neighbors talk, and the talk around the Jeddock house at 32nd Street and Abell Avenue has not been at all complimentary.
NEWS
June 27, 1997
WHEN SOMEONE pointed out to the mayor of West Palm Beach, Fla. that that children were playing in the community fountain she helped build, did she chase off the kids? No.She installed a lifeguard's chair, according to a recent profile in the New York Times.The town of Westminster, though, recently turned its municipal fountain into a giant planter. People in the Carroll County seat were so enthralled by the look of the town last month when a movie company trucked in flowers to spruce it up for a film shoot that Councilman Stephen R. Chapin Sr. suggested the town do some major planting of its own. Town officials said they noted a surge in civic pride during the filming of "For Richer or Poorer," starring Tim Allen and Kirstie Alley.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1996
As a boy in Chicago, Robert J. Griesbach eyed the flowers his geneticist father was cross-breeding and asked himself, why ARE roses red and violets blue?As a plant geneticist, Griesbach has spent 15 years at the Agricultural Research Service in Beltsville trying to answer that question.Now, the Ellicott City man thinks he has the answer, one that vaults genetic research over a decades-old barrier and that could open up a new world of striking, first-of-their-kind flower colors -- blue roses, red Easter lilies, pumpkin-colored petunias.
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