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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer | November 5, 1993
All the animals from the C&J Amusements petting zoo at the closed Tradersmart in Anne Arundel County have been saved from the slaughterhouse, although some of their newly found homes are temporary.More than a dozen people have offered to adopt the animals, which included a llama, a pony and three Vietnamese potbellied pigs. Meanwhile, two acquaintances of Donald and Louann Lewis, who operated the zoo as C&J Amusements, will shelter whatever animals are not sold, Mrs. Lewis said yesterday.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 13, 2014
It's the start of the summer season and that means many families will be heading to fairs and festivals with petting zoos. And state health officials said people to remember that chicks, ducks, turtles and other animals can transmit salmonella, E. coli campylobacter and other bacteria, viruses and parasites. Children in particular can become sick from cuddling these animals and their pets because they often put their hands in their mouths, health officials said. The State Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and several states and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are now investigating several outbreaks related to animals.
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NEWS
By CINDY PARR | October 18, 1993
Thank goodness for petting zoos!They bring the song "Old MacDonald Had A Farm" to life for youngsters who want to see first-hand the pig that goes oink-oink here or the cow that goes moo-moo there.Petting zoos have saved me over the past several years. They have always been popular with my children as a source of entertainment. They have provided them with the opportunity to see a variety of livestock they would rarely see, since we do not live on a farm.There are many petting zoos in the county.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | September 23, 2013
Despite the forecast of rain, the annual SARC Family Fun Day drew a crowd to the Harford County Equestrian Center on Tollgate Road in Bel Air Saturday afternoon. Though the day was supposed to feature hot air balloons, the mid-day winds that kicked up and threat of rain meant they couldn't go up in the air. Balloon owners still had their baskets set up, and let children and adults climb in to see what it was like, but the colorful balloons were grounded, not even out of their bags.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer | November 5, 1993
All the animals from the C&J Amusements petting zoo at the closed Tradersmart have been saved from the slaughterhouse, although some of their newly found homes are temporary.More than a dozen people have offered to adopt the animals, which included a llama, a pony and three Vietnamese potbellied pigs. Meanwhile, two acquaintances of Donald and Louann Lewis, who operated the zoo as C&J Amusements, will shelter whatever animals are not sold, Mrs. Lewis said yesterday.The Lewises said they needed to sell the animals -- even at a fraction of their value -- to recoup some of their financial loss, but preferred not to sell them for meat.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2000
With beads of sweat rolling down his face, 16-month-old Zachary Michali of Hanover, Pa., dabbed specks of green and purple on a coffee filter and proudly displayed his artistic creation. Attached to the end of a green pipe cleaner, the coffee filter was transformed into a flower pretty enough to present to his mother, 26-year-old Shannon Michali. She accepted the gift graciously, a gesture that made the toddler giggle. "We're having a great time, despite the heat," Michali said. She and Zachary were among the nearly 2,000 people who flocked to Carroll County 4-H/FFA Fair yesterday to celebrate Children's Day. The day included games and activities for children.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | June 13, 1999
Maybe it was the map, detailing acres of carnival booths, pony rides and tables of pit beef, hamburgers, hot dogs and boardwalk-style fries.Or it could have been the petting zoo that featured a zebra and an emu. Or the sports director hired to bring military precision to the volleyball, basketball, softball and soccer games that were divided into age groups and scheduled hour-by-hour.Whatever it was, yesterday's picnic for thousands of T. Rowe Price employees seemed like a family-oriented Fantasy Island, with almost every wholesome, fun-filled activity imaginable -- but without the frou-frou umbrella drinks.
NEWS
September 25, 2003
Fallfest opens today Westminster Fallfest 2003 begins today at the Westminster City Playground off Longwell Avenue. Billed as "the biggest charitable event of Carroll County," the festival supports designated local charities with proceeds earned during the four-day event. The 25th annual festival continues through Sunday with rides, games, food, vendors and entertainment as follows: TODAY: 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. 4 p.m. to 10 p.m.: Kid's Court open, scarecrow making, Super Ride Night ($12)
NEWS
March 10, 1991
Farmers from Carroll and around the state are invited to the Maryland Department of Agriculture open house March 23.The event will begin with a 10-K "Maryland with Pride" run at 9 a.m.Visitors may take tours of the department's new wing and view laboratories where studies are done on animal feeds, household cleaning products, fertilizers and pesticides.Maryland food commodity groups will be giving cooking and other food demonstrations throughout the day.Events for children include a coloring contest, face painting and a petting zoo.Soda and hot dogs will be sold for 10 cents.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer | November 3, 1993
A llama, goats and other animals from the petting zoo at the defunct Tradersmart indoor bazaar may be slaughtered if the zoo's owners cannot find homes for them."
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2011
They don't squeal like pigs, cluck like chickens or quack like ducks. In fact, you scarcely get a sound out of them unless you pick one up and try your hand at music. That is why teachers at Glenwood Middle School in Howard County are hosting an "instrumental petting zoo" on Saturday, hoping that area youngsters take to a cafeteria filled with orchestra instruments they way they do to barnyard filled with animals. Exposing students as early as first grade to the instruments could spawn an interest in the school's music program when they reach third or fourth grade, said Trish De Orio, strings teacher at Glenwood Middle and Gorman Crossing Elementary schools in Laurel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lindsey Citron and Lindsey Citron,lindsey.citron@baltsun.com | October 9, 2008
From pumpkin carving to apple picking to cider drinking, autumn is packed with inexpensive ways to have fun. Just step foot on Weber's Cider Mill Farm, and the scent of fall flowers and oven-fresh pies is enough to erase the prospect of the looming winter season. The farm, which is owned by Steve Weber, offers numerous activities for all members of the family, including a scarecrow workshop. As Weber circles the farm, children are yanking their parents from one activity to the next. Just below the turkey pen is a foot-high hay maze, the younger kids' version of the nearby corn maze that is meant for older children and their parents.
NEWS
By Sarah Hoover and Sarah Hoover,special to The Sun | January 11, 2008
Candlelight Concerts presents the Brazilian Guitar Quartet in concert at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at Wilde Lake Interfaith Center. These virtuoso guitarists will offer a program featuring works by Bach, Albeniz, Villa-Lobos, Miranda, Guarnieri and Mignone. Everton Gloeden, Luiz Mantovani, Tadeu do Amaral and Clemer Andreotti have worldwide reputations as solo artists. Together, this quartet has shaped a dynamic artistic identity, particularly through its inclusion of the eight-string guitar developed by Paul Galbraith, one of the Brazilian Guitar Quartet's founding members.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | June 11, 2007
That it was the first day of strawberry picking didn't occur to Emmitsburg resident Alison Mauro and her family. It was the free petting zoo - a treat for Mauro's 2-year-old son, Luke - that lured them to the Carroll County farm. But once the Mauros saw the "Pick Your Own Strawberries" banner at the entrance, new plans were made. An hour later, Luke emerged from the field with a bulging basket of ruby beauties for the family. The Mauros bought shortcake and whipped cream from the farm's bakery, salivating over the dessert they planned to assemble back home.
TRAVEL
By [LORI SEARS] | May 20, 2007
Savor sweet strawberries and enjoy family activities all day Saturday and May 27 at the Delaplane Strawberry Festival at Sky Meadows State Park in Delaplane, Va. The family festival features plenty of good eats, as well as fun food activities, including a strawberry-eating contest, an array of strawberry goodies for purchase, a bake sale of unique treats such as hazelnut brownies and apricot brandy pound cake, and fair foods, including burgers, crab...
NEWS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 2007
Entering Clark's Elioak Farm, one immediately notices that this is not your typical children's petting zoo. Instead, eye-popping colors and shapes that include a gigantic purple shoe, a huge orange pumpkin coach and a crooked house jump out at you. If the items seem vaguely familiar, you're right. They all came from the Enchanted Forest, a well-known storybook theme park in Ellicott City that closed in the late 1980s and later fell into disrepair. Over the past three years, Martha Clark has been restoring items from the former theme park and transporting them to her 540-acre Ellicott City farm and petting zoo for the next generation of children to climb on, explore and enjoy.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1998
Words of a 'Titanic' adventurerListen to the adventures and drama of explorations in marine archaeology when Robert D. Ballard presents a lecture at 7 p.m. today at the National Aquarium, 501 E. Pratt St. Internationally famous for his discovery of the Titanic in 1985, Ballard also discusses the Bismarck, the Yorktown and the lost ships of Guadalcanal. Tickets are $12, $20 for non-members. Call 410-727-FISH.Santa, critters hold courtBeginning at 1 p.m. Saturday, children can give their wish list to Santa and be photographed with him at Santa's Place, and then take a close look at llamas, alpacas and small farm animals at Santa's Petting Zoo at Harborplace, between the Light Street and Pratt Street pavilions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | September 24, 1998
Peabody Open HouseAdd a little music to your life Sunday at the Peabody Institute's Open House, with performances, demonstrations, tours and activities for the family. The Peabody Symphony Orchestra, the Peabody Concert Orchestra and the Peabody Wind Ensemble will perform. Attend the "Instrument Petting Zoo" and get acquainted with some brass, woodwinds, percussions, guitars, strings and harps. See piano and dance demonstrations and learn about offered classes. Tour the facilities, including the George Peabody Library, and see the newly renovated Griswold Hall with its Holtkamp organ and the 16th-century Flemish tapestry celebrating the triumphs of the Roman General Scipio.
TRAVEL
By CHARLES PASSY and CHARLES PASSY,COX NEWS SERVICE | July 16, 2006
ORLANDO, FLA. / / Is it possible to find peace at Walt Disney World? The short answer -- at least to most parents -- is "No!" To trek through four attraction-filled theme parks with an eager-to-do-it-all child (or two) in hand is to ask for trouble. Add in the sauna-like summer heat, the wallet-busting concession prices and the interminable waits and you have got the perfect cocktail for a parental migraine. Unless, of course, you learn to take a break. In no particular order, here are 10 of my favorite mini escapes -- places that offer a little bit of shade and quiet and an opportunity to rest your feet: Afternoon tea at the Grand Floridian Spa & Resort's Garden View lounge.
NEWS
July 14, 2006
Indiana has much to recommend it. James Dean and David Letterman were born there. The state's high-quality limestone and plethora of covered bridges deserve a spot in any Midwest tourism guide. But as pleasant as the Hoosier state may be, who could possibly think it's filled with anywhere near as many potential terrorism targets as New York and California combined? The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, that's who. Yes, the same people who thought it was appropriate to increase security grants for Omaha, Neb., but reduce funding to New York and Washington also believe Indiana has 8,591 potential terrorist targets compared with New York's 5,687 and California's 3,212.
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